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Full text of "Clarion Call, September 28, 1968 – May 9, 1969"

CLARION. PA. 




Carlson Library 



Clarion Call September 1968-May 1969 



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ALF: troph ies presented for floats 



Title 



AndxeJ^rJj^nTB^chr^ spe nt year in^we deT 

Archaeologicaljabrto^operate with state 

Band: Revue^held " 

Bandijiecond^nnuafband^y^ 



??.P^iJ?_i®3<^i'OD[!®comingparad¥ 

Band^p^l^rmat^ California 

Baseball: beats Westminist er 

Basketball^^mjette^^^^^^ 

Berberi an, Vahe: to pre sent^eiioTenitai 



^?5KsP!5POsedTangesJnadm^ 



BlainQack: a cting planetariu m director 



Bohlen. CtuistJan?^ recital 



Bowlin g Team: se cond in Youngstown 
Brewster, Dr. Wallace : jojnsfaculty 



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Bro oks. Frank: new basketball player 



C afeteria: Food problemsdisctJSRftri 
Campbell, Fran kjyL sees chanj^^ ctuj^^ 



Ca nning, Dr. Thomas, to ject ure 

Canning, Dr. ThomasToutJines new paths in music" 



Carrero, Jaime: General concepts of painting 



Carrero, Jaime: to s peak 

Chandler dinin g h allFstudent complaints 



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C heerleaders chosen 

Cheerleaders named ~ 

Coleman, Frank: will appear at carnival 



College Chapel.J<athieene^ 



College Readers: plan program 



Concert season: members selected 



CSC: Awarded na tiona[araiiTt 



CSC: Chinese^tudents impressed 



C SC: Christmas^ coricert 

CSC;^oncert^band preseritsannual apring show" 



CSC: Dis ciplined^oard announced 



CSC: establishes conservation education center 



CSC: fight at "c arnival 



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CSC: Head Start program initiated 



C SC: Honors convocatio n to be held 



CSC: Miss Clarion State College pageant to be hel d" 
CSC: new buildings planned ~ " 



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CSCjjie\«MTumbeirirTgsys^ operational 

CSC: New signout system for womerT" 
CSC: Nixon's the one in mock vote 



CSCj^anhelanic council elects officers 



CSCM;ecejyeslwo f ederal gra nls 



CSC: Union dedicated 



CSC: variety show planned 
De an's List 1968 Spring Semes ter 
Debate^jubjjinish Ngh in three tournaments" 
Debate Club: freshmarTtakefirsTpJace 



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Date 



October 18, 1968 



Octot)er11. 1968 
October 4. 1968 



November 22, 1986 



September 28, 1968 
October 11, 



1968 



October 25. 1968 



May 2, 1969 
October 18. 1968 



October 11. 1968 



May 2. 1969 



September 28, 1968 



February 28, 1969 



March 7, 1969 



October 18. 1968 



February 14. 1969 



February 21. 1969 



February 14. 1969 



October 18. 1968 



October 25. 1968 



February 14. 1969 



February 7. 1969 



^tovember1. 1986 



Decembe r 13. 196 8 
September 28. 1968 



April 18. 1969 



November 1. 1986 



September 28, 1968 



October 11, 1968 



January 10, 1969 
November 22, 1986 



December 13, 1968 



March 14, 1969 
January 10, 1969 



November 1. 1986 
May9. 1969~ 



March 7. 1969 



March 14. 1969 



February 28. 1969 



October 11, 1968 



October 25, 1968 



Feb agryJ, 1969 



November 8, 1968 



April 18, 1969 



October 18, 1968 



January 10. 1969 



December 13. 1968 



September 28. 1968 



De cember 13. 1 968 
November 15. 1968 



Pa£e 

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'^■■■■1 



Clarion Call September 1968-May 1969 



Clarion Call September 1968-May 1969 



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Debate Club: hono red a t state tourney 
Debate Club: Pile up victories 



Debate Club: win tournament 



Debate Club: win, then ^lose ir^tournanfTent i n Georgi a 

Debate Clubj^\Mns^trqphy^_ ' 

Delta Lambda Tau: takes root 



Dickson. David: speaks at honors event 
Dickson, D avid: speaks on open society 



Drama Depa rtment: To gi ve M iller' s "After the Fall' 
Faculty Members: new lis ted 



Faculty Senate: apprives curriculum chang e 



Faculty Sen a te: approves masters in communications 
Facult y Se nate: c onsid erin g judicial process es 
Facul ty Sena te: Disc uss c redit by exam 
Faculty Senate: new by laws 



Faculty: seven professors t ake sabbatical leaves 



Fine Arts Building: cornerstone to be placed 



Footbal 



Footbal 



Footbal 



Footbal 



Footbal 



Footbal 



Footbal 



Footbal 



Footbal 



Footbal 



Footbal 



Footbal 



Footbal 



Footbal 



Footbal 



Footbal 



Footbal 



Becker, Jim 



: Eagles beat Lockhaven. 14-3 



Eagles beat S RU 



: Eagles claw Geneva Tornadoes 



: Eagles defeat Edinboro 



eagles defeated by Indiana Indians 



Eagles loose to Dover 



: Erdeljae, Bob, replaces Alcom, Jim 



freshmen team close out season 



: golden eagles hold Raiders score less 



: Homecoming vs. Edinboro 



: Lackhaven will field one of best teams for Eagles 



Mansfield looses 



to California for big game 



to loose 12 men 



: Vulcans clip eagles wings 



: Wickstrom. Oberdorf named football players of the week 



Gemmel. James: attended conference at Hershey 
Gemmel. James: s tre sse s good teaching 



Gemmell, Dr. James: to serve on panel 



Gemmell, James: attends conference in Hershey 
Geography Club: new on campus 



Giunta. Mike: football player of the week 
Golf Team: lose to Geneva 



Golf Team: win against Pitt Panthe rs 
Greek Olympics 



Greek sing: Delat Zetas and Theta Chis first 
G rosch , William: Pottery shown 



H artford, Lincoln Rev.: ne w protesta nt campus ministe r 
Hartley. Harold: designs speech instrument 
Homecoming success 



Homec oming: Dimmerling is queen 
Hom ecom ing: events planned 



Jazz band 



B 



March 14. 1969 
February 7, 1969 



Novemt)er1, 1986 



Novembers. 1968 



January 10. 1969 
Novembers, 1968 



February 7, 1969 



March 14, 1969 



September 28, 1968 



October 4. 1968 



Novembers, 1968 



February 21, 1969 



February 7, 1969 



March 7, 1969 



May 9. 1969 



January 10, 1969 



September 28, 1968 



October 25. 1968 



October 11, 1968 



November 15. 1986 



October 4, 1968 



October 18, 1968 



October 25, 1968 



September 28, 1968 



October 18, 1968 



Novemt)er22, 1986 



Novembers, 1968 



October 11, 1968 



October 4, 1968 



September 28, 1968 



October 25, 1968 



November 22, 1986 



November 1, 1986 



October 4, 1968 



October 4, 1968 



September 28. 1968 



March 21, 1969 



October 25. 1968 



October 25, 1968 



November 15, 1986 



May 9, 1969 



May 2. 1969 



May 2. 1969 



May 2. 1969 



September 28. 1968 



May 9. 1969 



October 4. 1968 



October 18, 1968 



October 11. 1968 



October 4, 1968 



Febmary 7, 1969 



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Jazz concerts: success 

^ly^ CluJ>i attends W^sfPeTui^rneet 



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Judo^lubrfimsh seco^^ i nvitational 

Judo Club: go through promotion al tests 

Jud o Club: meets i n Cleve land 

Judo Club: perfec t score 

Judo Club: placeMhirdat Penn State 

Judq^lub:^core^3jwinsjn NY 

Ju do Clu b: showsjiiatch techniques 



J^'-P!!i JgUgjjJlPrefor mance evokes o vation 



Klin gensmith. Myron: controls ^CSCpu rse strings 



Komenda. Tom: football player of the week 



Lazich, Milutin: present voice recital 
Lignelli,jrarTk^^ Presidenrof PA att^ ^ 



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Marching Band Members 



Marth a Reeves and the Vandellas wilTperformT 
Mazurowski. MaricMJbra[yscierice professor pubiishes" 



McCau^liff. BanT^capjuresJirst atJDu^^ 



Me n's Basketball: cagers lose 91 -85 to Walsh 

k M ■ _ »i« ■ .. .. -. — 



Men's Basketball: Coa chJo y predicts future 



Men's Basketball: have five and ten record 



Men^ jasketball: lose two defeat at Lockhaveri 



Men's Basketball: Place secon d andjiird"in Hniiriay tnurpoy" 



Men's Basketball: Point Parkbeats CSC 



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Men's Basketball: Scots"scalp Eagle s 



-^JgP^^^^Qtba ll: team prepares for student opener 
Men's B asketball: upsets Gro ve City 



Men's Basketball: wins three games 



Men's Track: duahrieetvictory 



Metress, James: heads Shawnee Tribe re searghproject 



Mitchell. Marcia: award for best biJI 



Mitchell. Rex: composes for band 



Moore, Dean: Speaks of Cla rion growth 



Nair. Bertha: retired English profess or passes away atTgT 



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Neal. Diane: crowned Miss NW PA 
Niebel, Doug : outstanding wrestling senior' 
Play Review: "Carnival" a success 



Play Review: "No Exit" is a success 
Play Review: after the fall 



Play R eview: Ah. Wildeme ss! 



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Podolak. Joe: press^presentsjjayer 

P roudfot. William: appointed infoFmation direct or" 



Reisman, Betty: named women's housing dean 



Rjdgg. D r. Martin: speaks on social critics 



Rjfle^ub: beat Duquesne 



Rifle Club:~breakT300 mark 



Rifle Club: defeated 



Rifle Club: faces Allegheny 



Rifle Clutr high est score totals in history 



Rifle Club: lose two. win match 



Ruane. Regis: letters in basketball and footbaJT 



B 



February 28, 1969 
December 13, 1968 



February 21, 1969 



May 9, 1969 



Novembers, 1968 



Febru ary 1 4, 1969 



February 28, 1969 



March 14, 1969 



February?, 1969 



Septe mber 28, 1968 



November 1, 1986 



Novemt)er 1. 1986 



October 25, 1968 



March 21, 1969 



September 28, 1968 



March 21, 1969 



March 21, 1969 



February 28, 1969 



March?, 1969 



Novemt»er 15. 1986 



February 7 , 1969 



February 21, 1969 



January 10, 1969 



January 10, 1969 



January 10. 1969 



November 22, 1986 



February 28, 1969 



December 13, 1968 



May 9, 1969 



October 25. 1968 



April 18. 1969 



February?, 1969 



December 13, 1968 



November 1, 1986 



April 25, 1969 



February 21. 1969 



May 2. 1969 



January 10, 1969 



October 4, 1968 



February 28, 1969 



February 7, 1969 



September 28, 1968 



October 4, 1968 



March 14, 1969 



March 7. 1969 



February 28, 1969 



November 22, 1986 



November 15, 1986 



February 21, 1969 



February?, 1969 



February 28, 1969 



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Clarion Call September 1968-May 1969 



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Schu etz, Elmer: football-player of the week 

Sigma TauDelta^rig[i^sh h onors groupTi olds first me eting] 

Student Sen ate: committees planned 

Student Senate: four gather at operi^ meeting 
Stud ent Sena te: highHghts reviewed 



Student Se nate: McNut t, Barbara, president of venango campus 



Student Senate: money approved 



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Studen|Senate : new committ ee approved ~ 

Stud ent Senate;^participates in na tional stu dent association 



Student Senate: Presidency battle 



Student Senate: seven committees planned 



Student Senate: to underwrite events 



Student Soloist : RqncorTe^co^nductsjymphony 



Stu dent U ni on Board : receives new rules 
S wimming: CSC hosts meeT 



Tippin Gym dedicated 



Tippin, Waldo: honore d at gym d edication 



Vaijro, E thel: dean, impressedby^students 



Wallace. Governor George C: discusses convention 



Wele sko, Carolyn: editorial staff chosen 



Wescot t. Nancy: In memor iam 



Wise. Bill: Eagle Plgyy_oftheWeek 



Women's S wimming: te am o rganized 



Wrestlers: lose to Bloomsburg 



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Wrestling: Clarion vs. Grove City 



Wr estling: grapplers finish in fine style 



Wrestling: hosts coachesmatclinic 



Wrestling: look f orward to good year 



Wrestling: lose to Lockhaven 



Wrestling: open season 



Wrestling: place at Navy meet 



Wrestling: place second at Penn State tourney 



Wrestling: Schmit, Bob leads 



Wrestling: stiff competition in conference championships 



Wrestling: tournament begins 



Wrestling: Tra vel to Cleveland 



Wrestling: trounce St. Francis 



Wrestling: victory against S RU 



Yough. Gloria: memorial service to be held 



B 



October 18, 1968 



October 4, 1968 



October 4. 1968 



November 15, 1986 



October 18, 1968 



October 18, 1968 



Febru ary 14, 1969 



November 22, 1986 



DeMmbeM3, 1968 
October 18, 1968 



November 8. 1968 



February 21, 1969 



September 28. 1968 



November 1, 1986 



Novembers, 1968 



October 4. 1968 



October 4, 1968 



November 1, 1986 



October 4, 1968 



September 28, 1968 



October 11, 1968 



September 28. 1968 



February 28. 1969 



February 7, 1969 



April 25. 1969 



April 25. 1969 



November 1. 1986 



November 22. 1986 



February 14. 1969 



December 13. 1968 



March 14. 1969 



March 7, 1969 



F ebruar y 28, 1969 



February 21, 1969 



February 28. 1969 



January 10. 1969 



February 28. 1969 



January 10. 1969 



September 28. 1968 



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Drama Dept. to Give 
Miner's 'After the FaU' 



Hoiirs Changed 
For Residence Halls 



A majtMT change in the social lives of Clar- 
km State College women students is the ex- 
tension of hours to midnight on weeisdays and 
Suoday, and to 2 a.m. on Friday and Satur- 
day nights. 

Last year, the Women's Residence Hall 
Board consisted of Connie Carter, chairman; 
Linda Ummer, Carole Reis, Carol Minchoff, 
Judy Macuga, Marg Butler, Elaine McGui- 
ian, Leslie Hudak, and Ginny Elish. The 
board set up an "ad hoc" committee for the 
Investigation of extended hours and petitioned 
for thene later hours; this summer W. R. B. 
and the Associatto* of Women Students re- 
ceived the news o< the extended hours from 
the administration. W R. B. exists under the 
supervision of A. W. S., the largest women's 
organizatioo on our campus. 

The A. W. S. Council for the 1958-69 school 
season is teaded by Leslie Hudak, president. 
Members of the executive board are Marg 
Butler, vice-president; Pat Losik, treasurer; 
Sandy Bordiek, recording secretary; and 
Jeanne Struble, corresponding secretary. The 
council consists of these women and Ellen 
filough, I. A. W. S. contact, and Marsha Kra- 
marlk, PanHellenic representative. The new 
council took their offices last spring. 

The first project of the year for the new 
council was the "Big Sister-Little Sister" 
party, held September 25. The "Big Sister- 
Little Sister" program i.s one designed to 
help orient freshman women with Clarion be- 
fore their actual arrival on campus. During 
the summer, upperclnsswomen arc each as- 
signed an incoming freshman woman to 
whom they write letters in which they ans- 
wer many of the questions freshmen have 
about campus life. At the annual party, whose 
theme this year was "Flower Power," skits 
entertained the 500 women students. Each 
iHg sister made a flower nametag for her- 
self and her litUe sister in the hope that 
theirs would win the prizes which were given 
for oHginality, color and de.sign, and effect. 



The Department <d Speech and Dramatic 
Arts of Clarion State College will op^n iti 
1968-69 season Wednesday, October 2. with 
"After the Fall," a play by ArUwr MUter. 

"Ttiis is not a play about' something, hope- 
fully, it is somethiag. And primarily it is 
a way of looking at man and his human 
nature as the ^y source of tiye violence 
which has come closer and closer to destroy- 
ing the race. It is a view which does not 
look toward social or political ideas as the 
creators of violence, but into the nature of 
the human being himself. The one commmi 
denominator in all violent acts is the human 
being," so says Arthur Miller. 

The action takes place in the mind, thought, 
and memory of Qu^atin. Excepting for one 
chair there is no furniture in the convention- 
al sense, no walls or substantial boundaries. 
People appear and disappear instantaneously, 
as in the mind; but it is not necessary that 
they walk off the tage. The dialogue will 
make clear who is "alive" at any moment 
and who is in aLeyaace. 

The Clarion production of "After the FaU" 
will play through October 5, at the college 
chapel. Students arc requested to turn their 
titeatre passes for reserved seats at the col- 
lege chapel beginning Monday, September 
30, to Friday, October 4, betwaan 1 and 4 
p.m. daily. 

The production will be directed by Bob 
H. Copeland and the cast is headed by John 
Solomon and Connie Carter. Mr. Solomon 
will portray Qu6ntin, in whose mind the play 
takes place. We shall move through his levels 
of memory and guilt and redempticHi during 
liis life. Miss Carter as Maggie. Quentin's 
second wife, the most vivid, pitiable, terrify- 
ing female character in the American theater 
since Blanche DuBois of Tennessee Williams' 
"Streetcar Named Desire." Veronica Smith, 
Pat Losick, Pam McFeathers, Lynn McGa- 
han, Judy Cross, Herb Michaels, Steve 
Brezzo, and Phil Ross are tlie other major 
roles. The t(rtal cast uumbcrs 25. 

ITie forthcoming production will be a new 
and unique experience for theater-goers, ac- 
cording to Director Copeland. 

Clarion State's Department of Speech and 
Dramatic Arts is planning a full season of 
standard and experimental theater produc- 
tions. 



Editorial Staff Chosen 



Carolyn Welesko has been chosen as editor- 
in-cUel and Tom Smith will serve »gam as 
busteess manager for the 19^-69 Ctmrfoa CaU 
staff. CMber ptgttwaB which are i^d in- 
clude: Sandy Diesel, news editor: Rosemary 
SlelK>dnik, copy e^tor; Gene Herrit and Gary 
Andres, sports editors; and Peg Foley, ex- 
change editor. In »ddition, Ed Wozniak will 
be Greek news coordinator and Georgana 
Winters will be staff cartoonist. 

Tite first staff Meeting was held on Mon- 
day, September 18, at which time twenty-four 
students sliowed interest in working on the 
CaU staff. Those present include: Owen Win- 
ters, Gene Herrit, Sandy Diesel, Sue Fair, 
Kathy Barron, Elizabeth Curley, Jerry Zary, 
Jane Sellman, Nancy Sarginger, Barb Nel- 
son, Peg Foley, Rosemary Slebodnik, Ann 
Rohrbaugh, Ed Wozniak, Gary Andres, Paul- 
ette Kishaw, Kathy Clapper, Gary Daurora, 
Gene Segrrtl, Linda Sonnenfeld, Georgana 
Winters, Herb Michaels, Dianna Cherry, and 
Sharon Bonser. Other new editorial staff 
members are Larilyn Andre and Greg Wilson. 



The new CaU office is located in the old 
girls' locker room of Harvey Hall, where all 
■ articles or releases should be submitted by 
5 p.m. rtii ItttBday, each week of puttficatloa. 
Students and faculty are invited to submit 
articles or letters at any time with the un- 
derstanding that the editors reserve the right 
to accept or reject material for publicatitm at 
their discretion. Tlie editors of the Cull be- 
lieve in freedom of the press and will con- 
sider for publication controversial articles 
and editorials. Assertions and generalizations 
should be supported by fact. 

The new staff will be working under the 
direction of Dr. Richard Redfem, professor 
o* English, who has been appointed faculty 
advisor for the Call. He has replaced Mr. 
Willard Mecklenburg, former advisor and 
public relations director, who left Claritwi to 
accept a position with the Pittsburgh Press. 
A current report, however, indicates that Mr. 
Mecklenburg is now working at Duquesne 
University. 



Prexy Wields a Trowel 




PRESIDENT GEMMELL places trowel of cement for Fine Arts Center corn- 
erstone at ctfonony held S^tember 19. 





Vol |b, No. 1 



CLARION STATE COLLEGE -- CLARION, PENNSYLVANIA 



Saturday, September 28, 1968 



Future Fine Arts Center for CSC Campus 




Located at the corner of Payne Street and Green- 
ville Avenue is the steel framework of the Fine Arts 
Center, which will house the offices and classrooms for 
art, music, and speech and drama activities at Clarion 
State. The building, designed by L^>n Hufnagel, will 
provide two auditoriums for lectures, concerts, dramatic 
recitals, and operettas. The auditorium will also be used 
as a place for student convocations and other large group 
gatherings on the campus. 

The building, which will cost $2,700,000, will have, 



for the Art Department, a gallery for local and traveling 
exhibits and three major specialized studios for sculp- 
ture, ceramics, and crafts. The Music Department will 
have nineteen voice and instrumental practice rooms, 
studios, and ensemble rehearsal rooms, along with a 
band and large choral practice area. The Speech De- 
partment will have a debate room, speech laboratory, 
and design studios. 

The Fine Arts Center is scheduled for completion 
in the fall semester of 1969. (Scheffer Studio) 



Flawless Style 
By Bong Hi Kim 
Evokes Ovation 

Playing before an enthusiastic audience 
which fiUed the College Chapel on Wednesday 
night. Dr. Bong Hi Kim, at her first appear- 
ance at Clarion State College, revealed com- 
plete mastery of musical style and total com- 
mand of pianlstlc technique. 

Her playing throughout the evening was 
characterized by her personal involvement 
in the music she was playing, and by the 
seeming ease with which every technical and 
musical demand was met. Her exciting per- 
formance was greeted by an enthusiastic ova- 
tion. 

Dr. Kim's flawless sense of style was evi- 
dent throughout the evening. Four sonatas 
by Scarlettl were performed with clarity and 
precision, and with subtle shading of dyna- 
mics and expressive phrasing. In "The Fan- 
tasia in C Major" by Robert Schumann, Dr. 
Kim was fully equal to the wi<fe range of 
emotion and dramatic contrast demanded by 
the music. The slower movement of this fan- 
tasia was one of the highlights of the evening. 

Three pieces by Debussy, including the 
more familiar "Reflections in the Water," 
presented another aspect of Dr. Kim's com- 
mand of expressive tone color. The shimmer- 
ing and elusive atmospheric quality which 
Is a hallmark of Debussey's music was ef- 
fectively recreated by Dn Kim. 

Two Hungarian composers were represent- 
ed on the program, Bela Bartok, whose re- 
search into the true folk music of his coun- 
try is well known, and Franz Liszt, whose 
music reflects the captivating charm and 
rapidly shifting moods of Hungarian gypsy 
music. Dr. Kim's performance of Liszt's "12- 
th Hungarian Rhapsody" was in the tradi- 
tion of the great Liszt virtuosos, pianists 
of the recent past whose playing of Liszt's 
music revealed the essential beauties of the 
gypsy melodies and dance rhythms without 
being in any way obscured by the decora- 
tive arabesques with which Liszt surrounded 
them. 

Dr. Kim Is an associate professor of music 
who joined the Clarion faculty in September. 
She has appeared In concerts and recitals 
in Korea as well as in the United States. 

Cheerleaders Named 

The selection of the 1968-69 CSC cheerlead- 
Ing squad was made following try-outs last 
week. The girls were chosen according to 
their performance of the cheers and execution 
of skills. The following girls were chosen: 
Dawn ^edorka. Candy James, Mary Joyce 
Kapp, and Kathy Faust. These girls will work 
with last year's chee.leaders, Janice Day 
and Barb Dlmmerling, and together they will 
comprise a six-^rl squad. 



FOR GLORIA YOUGH 



Memorial Service Wednesday; 
Scholarship Fund In Her 
Memory Now Being Created 



A memorial service for Gloria Yough, as- 
sociate professor of health and physical ed- 
ucation who died iu August, will be held' 
at 3 p.m. Wednesday in the dance studio 
of the Waldo S. Tippin Gymnasium. 

Miss Yough died suddenly of a heart attack 
at her home in Clarion on August 15 and 
was buried in Petrolia on August 19. She 
Imd taught at Clarion State College for seven 
years and was widely admired by students 
and by other faculty members. 

At the memorial service Wednesday, speak- 
ers will include Mr. Donald E. Leas, director 
of health, physical education, and recreation; 
Dr. Harold E. Simmons, director of profes- 
sional studies; and Mr. Waldo S. Tippin, em- 
eritus professor of education and former di- 
rector of athletics. The Madrigal Singers, 
under the direction of Mr. William M. Mc- 
Donald of the Music Department, will sing, 
"Weep, Oh Mine Eyes" and "Wild Swans." 

Miss Yough earned both a bachelor's de- 
gree and a master's degree in physical edu- 
cation at the University of Michigan. She 
had completed all but one of the courses 
required for the doctorate at the University 
of Pittsburgh. In addition, she had studied 
ai. Pennsylvania State University and the Un- 
iversity of Oslo (Norway). 

She was instrumental in planning the cur- 
riculum in health' and physical education for 
students majoring In elementary education, 
and in the fall term, 1967, she taught the 
first graduate course in physical education 
?t Clarion State College. Miss Yough attended 
several workshops in movement education 
and in synchronized and speed swimming;'' 
in addition, she taught a workshop in move- 
ment education, in September 1967, for ele- 
mentary school teachers of Clarion County. 

Last year Miss Yough formed and taught 
the nucleus of a synchronized swimming 
class. The class, which was held at the Brtwk- 
vlUe Y, was planned as the start of a sj^Ti- 
chronized swimming program in the new col- 
lege natatorium. She also formed the first 
ski club at Qarion State and was the club 
sponsor from 1960 to 1966. 

In addition to her leadership in physical 
education, Miss Yough was serving her se- 
cond term as an elected member of the Fa- 
culty Senate. She was also an accomplished 
oboist and clarinetist and In 1960 played In 
the College Symphwiy Orchestra. 

The Reverend David J. Lutz of the Campus 
Ministry will give tiie be^^ctuA. 



Arrangements have been made to create 
» scholarship in memory of Gloria Yough, 
associate professor ot health and physical 
education, who died in August. Friends of 
Miss Yough in both ihe college and the com- 
munity may make jifts in her name to the 
Clarion State College Scholarship Fund. 

A scholarship in her memory is appropriate 
not only because of ihe high regard in which 
Miss Yough was h«ld by her colleagues and 
her students but also because, on a number 
of occasions, she helped out, anonymously, 
students who were in financial need. 

The college scholarship fund Is adminis- 
tered by the Office of Financial Aid, which 
is under the directicMi of Robert C. Sege- 
barth. 

Last week a number of faculty members 
paid tribute to Miss Yough: 

Pearl Bonner: "Gioria believed in a dream 
for a new kind of education for children in a 
gyp. I know that she was often fearful that 
thip program would not be successful. But 
she went on believing and working toward 
her goal." 

Peggy Curry: "As a teacher of a graduate 

class, Gloria was exciting. As a teacher of 

chiMren, Gloria was soft-spoken and patient. 

She valued each child as an individual and 

Jjelieved in self-improvement for each child." 

Helen Knuth: "It's not going to be easy 
to find someone to take Gloria's place. She 
had the unusual combination of a first-rate 
intetligence, a real Interest in scholarship, 
good common sense, the ability to enjoy life 
and to enjoy her work, and a genuine con- 
cern for other people. She was fun to be 
with and was a real addition to any social 
gathering." 

Pauline Wiberg: "I remember Gloria as 
lit^ch a warm, friendly person with kind con- 
sideration for all, a person with a great 
sense of humor, making each meeting with 
her a pleasure." 

Students also paid tribute to Miss Yough: 

hmiis Mete: "Any student who has had 
U'.e good fortune to have Miss Gloria Yough 
Bb an instructor, as I did, surely must realize 
what a great loss we share, and how sin- 
cerely we will miss her. She had a unique 
quality in the devotion she portrcyed as a 
teacher, in the interest she showed in her 
students, and in the friendly attitude she 
always had both in and out of class." 

Roberta Baum: "I found Miss Yough to 
be a verj' warm pers«j. Her death was an 
extreme shock to me, as it was my first 
experience In losing a very competent teach- 
er and also a cl<^e friend." 



Fine Arts 
Cornerstone 
Is Placed 



In a ceremony which was threatened at 
the start by light raio. the cornerstone at 
the new Fine Arts Center was laid Thursday, 
September 19. 

The program began with the playing of 
the national anthem by the Clarion State 
College Marching Band, under the direction 
of Dr. Stanley F. Miehalski, Then the Rev. 
Dr. Eldon K. Somers of the Campus Ministry 
gave the invocation, in which he spoke of 
the Fine Arts Center as a "pulpit of artistic 
and dramatic college achievements." Preced- 
ing the introduction of the guests by the 
program's host, Dr. Elbert R. Moses, Chair- 
man of the Department of Speech and Dra- 
matic Arts, was "Grace My Lovely One, 
Fair Beauties," sung by the Clarion Madrigal 
Singers. Dr. Moses then presented Dr. James 
Gemmell, the president of Clarion State Col- 
lege, who spoke a few words about the build- 
ing Itself, stating that the new center would 
have two auditoriums with seating capacities 
of 1700 and 250, as compared with the audi- 
torium now in use which has a capacity 
of 450 at the most. 

Representing the General State Authority 
was Robert E. Linker, executive assistant 
to R(^bert L. Kunzig, who discussed the many 
changes on state college campuses. Mr. Link- 
er also assured the .audience of faculty mem- 
bers, college trustees and students that the 
building is progressing on schedule. The sch- 
eduled date for completion is July 31, 1969. 

Participating In ihe trowelling ceremony, 
In which each person placed a trowel xtt 
cement In the space reserved for the comer- 
stone, were President Gemmell; Mr. Linker; 
Mr. Joseph Spencc, chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Art: Dr. Robert Van Meter, chair- 
man of the Department of Music; Dr. Moses; 
Mr. E. Clinton Stttt, Board of Trustees; Mr. 
Iliomas J. Paolino, president of the Student 
Senate; and Miss Leshe Hudak, president 
of ti^ Association of Women Students. 

Following the ceremony, Mr. Stltt not?d 
that the Fine Arts Center is another milestone 
in the growth of Clarion State College, and 
that the trustees of Clarion were justifiably 
proud of that growth. The Madrigal Singers, 
under the direction of William M. McDonald, 
performed "Fire, Fire My Heart," after 
which Rev. Somers gave the benediction, do- 
sing the program was the Clarion State C<^- 
lege Alma Mater. 



Registration 
fs Revised 



With the tolling of school bells across the 
nation, the students of Clarion State College 
returned to discover that registration, a once 
dreaded ordeal, has been revised. A process 
once requiring hours of standing in lines was 
reduced to a reasonably small amount of 
time. 

There are 2,912 full-time undergraduate 
students enrolled at Clarion this year, and 
there are 298 full-time undergraduate stu- 
dents enrolled at Venango. Clarion, this year, 
has 217 part-time students enrolled, and there 
are 47 part-time students enrolled at Venan- 
go. Full-time graduate students number 14, 
and there are 244 part-time graduate students 
enrolled. Total enrollment numbers 3,732, ac- 
cording to Mrs. Phyllis Elder, college regis- 
trar. 

In an Interview with Bryce Gray, adminis- 
trative assistant to the Dean of Academic 
Affairs, it was discovered that 500 of the 
total enrollment registered early. On Friday. 
September 6, the band members, the football 
players, and the student residents registered. 
Seniors, who are student teaching this semes- 
ter registered by mail. By the fall of 1970, 
it is hoped that many of the upperclassmen 
will be able to register by mail, and even- 
tually this will encompass all students. 

The congestion in the fees office will be 
hard to alleviate because of the number of 
students receiving scholarships and govern- 
ment loans. There Is no way for the fees 
office to know the amount of a scholarship 
or a loan until the state sends these forms. 
More often than ncrt, these forms do not 
reach the college until after registration. 

According to Mr. Gray, students of Claricm 
can not choose the classes and professors 
they want because one class will become 
overcrowded and another class will have 
practically no students. Another problem is 
Uiat students try to schedule all their classes 
in the morning or in the afternoon thus leav- 
ing too much time open. 

In the near future, schedule changes may 
all be made in the IBM room in Pelrce 
Center. TTiis would eliminate the moving from 
room to room only to discover a class ju^ 
added is closed. 

Even though some improvements have been 
ma^, rep^ratira will i^ver be a picnic, 
but will be made eaner in the coming yean. 



\. 



1 



1***^ 



\ 



i J 



Drama Dept. to Give 
Miller's 'After the Fall' 



Hours Changed 
For Residence Halls 



A major change in the social lives of Clar- 
ion State College women students is the ex- 
tension of hours to midnight on weekdays and 
Sunday, and to 2 a.m. on Friday and Satur- 
day nights. 

Last year, the Women's Residence Hall 
Board consisted of Connie Carter, chairman; 
Linda Ummer, Carole Rcis, Carol Minchoff, 
Judy Macuga, Marg Butler, Elaine McGui- 
gtn. Leslie Hudak, and Ginny Elish. The 
board set up an "ad hoc " committee for the 
investigation of extended hours and i>etitioned 
for these later hours; this summer W. R. B. 
and the Asssociation of Women Students re- 
ceived the news of the extended hours from 
the administration. W R. B, exists under the 
supervision of A. W. S., the largest women's 
organization on our campus. 

The A. W. S. Council for the IQ'JS-Cg school 
season is headed by Leslie Hudak, president. 
Members of the executive board are Marg 
Butler, vice-president; Pat Losik, treasurer; 
Sandy Bordick, recording secretary; and 
Jeanne Struble, corresponding secretary. The 
council consists of these women and Fallen 
Blough, L A. W. S. contact, and Marsha Kra- 
marik, PanHelienic representative. The new 
council tt>ok their offices last spring. 

The first project of the year for the new 
council was the "Big Sister-Little Sister" 
party, held September 25. The "Big Sister- 
Little Sister ' program is one designed to 
help orient freshman women with Clarion be- 
fore their actual arrival on campus. During 
tlic summer, upperclasswomon arc each as- 
signed an incoming freshman woman to 
whom they write letters in which they ans- 
wer many of the questions freshmen have 
about campus life. At the annual party, whose 
theme this year was "Flower Power," skits 
entertained the 500 women students. Each 
big sister made a flower nametag for her- 
self and her little sister in the hope that 
theirs would win the prizes which were given 
for originality, color and design, and effect. 



The Department of Speech and Dramatic 
Arts of Clarion Stale College will open its 
1968-69 season Wednesday, October 2, with 
"After the Fall," a play by Arthur Miller. 

"This is not a play 'about' something, hope- 
fully, it is something. And primarily it is 
a way of looking at man and his human 
nature as the only source of the violence 
which has come closer end closer to destroy- 
ing the race It is a view which does not 
look toward social or political ideas as the 
creators of violence, but into the nature of 
the human being himself. The one common 
denominator in all violent acts is the human 
being," so says Arthur Miller. 

The action takes place in the mind, thought, 
and memory of Qu -ntin. Excepting for one 
chair there is no funiicure in the convention- 
al sense, no walls or substantial boundaries. 
People appear and disappear instantaneously, 
as in the mind; but it is not necessary that 
they walk off the tage. The dialogue will 
make clear who is "alive" at any moment 
and who is in sLcyance. 

The Clarion production of "After the Fall" 
will play through October .5, at the college 
chapel. Students arc requested to turn their 
theatre passes for reserved seats at the col- 
lege chapel beginning Monday, September 
30, to Friday, October 4, between 1 and 4 
p.m. daily. 

The production will be directed by Bob 
II. Copeiand and the cast is headed by John 
Solomon and Connie Carter. Mr. Solomon 
will portray Quontin, in whose mind the play 
takes place. We shall move through his levels 
of memory and guili and redemption during 
his life. Miss Carter as Maggie, Quentin's 
second wife, the most vivid, pitiable, terrify- 
ing female character in the American theater 
since Blanche DuBoi.s of Tennessee Williams' 
"Streetcar Named Desire.'" Veronica Smith, 
Pat Losick, Pam McFeathers, Lynn McGa- 
han, Judy Cross. Herb Michaels, Steve 
Brezzo, and Phi! Ross aro the other major 
roles. The total cast numbers 25. 

The forthcoming production will be a new 
and unique experience for theater-goers, ac- 
cording to Director Copeiand. 

Clarion State's Department of Speech and 
Dramatic Arts is planning a full season of 
standard and experimental theater produc- 
tions. 



Editorial Staff Chosen 



Carolyn Welesko has been chosen as editor- 
in-chief and Tom Smith will serve again as 
business manager for the 1968-69 Clarion Call 
staff. Other positio:is which arc filled in- 
clude: Sandy Diesel, news editor; Rosemary 
Slebodnik, copy editor; Gene Herrit and Gary 
Andres, sports editors; and Peg Foley, ex- 
change editor. In addition, Ed Wozniak will 
be Greek news coordinator and Georgana 
Winters will be staff cartoonist. 

The first staff meeting was held on Mon- 
day, September 16, at which time twenty-four 
students showed interest in working on the 
Call staff. Those present include: Owen Win- 
ters, Gene Herrit, Sandy Diesel, Sue Fair, 
Kathy Barron, Elizabeth Curley, Jerry Zary, 
Jane Sellman, Nancy Sarginger, Barb Nel- 
son, Peg Foley, Rosemary Slebodnik, Ann 
Rohrbaugh, Ed Wozniak, Gary Andres, Paul- 
ette Kishaw, Kathy Clapper, Gary Daurora, 
Gene Segreti, Linda Sonnenfeld, Georgana 
Winters, Herb Michaels, Dianna Cherry, and 
Sharon Bonser. Other new editorial staff 
members are Larilyn Andre and Greg Wilson. 



The new Call office is located in the old 
girls' locker room of Harvey Hall, where all 
■ articles or releases should be submitted by 
5 p.m. on Monday, each week of publication. 
Students and faculty are invited to submit 
articles or letters at any time with the un- 
derstanding that the editors reserve the right 
to accept or reject material for publication at 
their discretion. The editors of the Call be- 
lieve in freedom of the press and will con- 
sider for publication controversial articles 
and editorials. Assertions and generalizations 
should be supported by fact. 

The new staff will be working under the 
direction of Dr. Richard Redfern, professor 
0*" English, who has been appointed faculty 
advisor for the Call. He has replaced Mr. 
Willard Mecklenburg, former advisor and 
public relations director, who left Clarion to 
accept a position with the Pittsburgh Press. 
A current report, however, indicates that Mr. 
Mecklenburg is now working at Duquesne 
University. 



Prexy Wields a Trowel 






Vol #), No. 1 



CLARION STATE COLLEGE — CLARION, PENNSYLVANIA 



Saturday, September 28, 1968 



Future Fine Arts Center for CSC Campus 



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PRESIDENT GEMMELL places trowel of cement for Fine Arts Center corn- 
erstone at ceremony held September 19. 




Located at the corner of Payne Street and Green- 
ville Avenue is the steel framework of the Fine Arts 
Center, which will house the offices and classrooms for 
art, music, and speech and drama activities at Clarion 
State. The building, designed by Leon Hufnagel, will 
provide two auditoriums for lectures, concerts, dramatic 
recitals, and operettas. The auditorium will also be used 
as a place for student convocations and other large group 
gatherings on the campus. 

The building, which will cost $2,700,000, will have. 



for the Art Department, a gallery for local and travehng 
exhibits and three major specialized studios for sculp- 
ture, ceramics, and crafts. The Music Department will 
have nineteen voice and instrumental practice rooms, 
studios, and ensemble rehearsal rooms, along with a 
band and large choral piactice area. The Speech De- 
partment will have a debate room, speech laboratory, 
and design studios. 

The Fine Arts Center is scheduled for completion 
in the fall semester of 1969. (Scheffer Studio) 



Flawless Style 
By Bong Hi Kim 
Evokes Ovation 

Playing before an enthusiastic audience 
which filled the College Chapel on Wednesday 
night. Dr. Bong Hi Kim, at her first appear- 
ance at Clarion State College, revealed com- 
plete mastery of musical style and total com- 
mand of pianistic technique. 

Her playing throughout the evening was 
characterized by her personal involvement 
in the music she was playing, and by the 
seeming ease with which every technical and 
musical demand was met. Her exciting per- 
formance was greeted by an pnthusiastic ova- 
tion. 

Dr. Kim's flawless sense of style was evi- 
dent throughout the evening. Four sonatas 
by Scarlett! were performed with clarity and 
precision, and with subtle shading of dyna- 
mics and expressive phrasing. In "The Fan- 
tasia in C Major" by Robert Schumann, Dr. 
Kim was fully equal to the wide range of 
emotion and dramatic contrast demanded by 
the music. The slower movement of this fan- 
tasia was one of the highlights of the evening. 

Three pieces by Debussy, including the 
more familiar "Reflections in the Water,'' 
presented another aspect of Dr. Kim's com- 
mand of expressive tone color. The shimmer- 
ing and elusive atmospheric quality which 
is a hallmark of Debus.sey's music was ef- 
fectively recreated by Dr. Kim. 

Two Hungarian composers were represent- 
ed on the program. Bela Bartok, whose re- 
search into the true folk music of his coun- 
try is well known, and Franz Liszt, whose 
music reflects the captivating charm and 
rapidly shifting moods of Hungarian gypsy 
music. Dr. Kims performance of Liszt's "12- 
th Hungarian Rhapsody" was in the tradi- 
tion of the great Liszt virtuo.sos. piani.sts 
of the recent past whose playing of Liszt's 
music revealed the essential beauties of the 
gypsy melodies and dance rhythms without 
being in any way obscured by the decora- 
tive arabesques with which Liszt surrounded 
them. 

Dr. Kim is an associate professor of music 
who joined the Clarion faculty in September. 
She has appeared in concerts and recitals 
in Korea as well as in the United States. 

Cheerleaders Named 

The selection of tlie 1968-69 CSC cheerlead- 
ing squad was made following try-outs last 
week. The girls were chosen according to 
their performance of the cheers and execution 
of skills. The following girls were chosen: 
Dawn Fedorka, Candy .James, Mary Joyce 
Kapp. and Kathy Faust. These girls will work 
with last year's chee.ieaders, Janice Day 
and Barb Dimmerling. and together they will 
comprise a six-girl squad. 



FOR GLORIA YOUGH 



Memorial Service Wednesday; 
Scholarship Fund In Her 
Memory Now Being Created 



A memorial service for Gloria Yough, as- 
.sociate professor of health and physical ed- 
ucation who died in August, will be held 
at 3 p.m. Wednesday in the dance studio 
of the Waldo S. Tippin Gymnasium. 

Miss Yough died sufidcniy of a heart attack 
at her home in Clarion on August 15 and 
was buried in Petrolia on August 19. She 
lu'd taught at Clarion State College for seven 
years and was widely admired by students 
and by other faculty members. 

At the memorial sovvice Wednesday, speak- 
ers will include Mr. Donald E. Leas, director 
of health, physical education, and recreation; 
Dr. Harold E. Simmons, director of profes- 
sional studies: and ;\Ir. Waldo S. Tippin, em- 
eritus professor of education and former di- 
rector of athletics. The Madrigal Singers, 
under the direction of Mr. William M. Mc- 
Donald of the Music Department, will sing. 
"Weep, Oh Mine Eyes" and "Wild Swans." 

Miss Yough earned both a bachelor's de- 
gree and a master's degree in physical edu- 
cation at the University of Michigan. She 
had completed all but one of the courses 
required for the doctorate at the University 
of Pittsburgh. In addition, she had studied 
a; Pennsylvania Stato University and the Un- 
iversity of O-slo (Norv/ay). 

She was instrumental in planning the cur- 
riculum in health" and physical education for 
students majoring in elementary education, 
and in the fall term, 1967, she taught the 
fir.st graduate course in physical education 
at Clarion State College. Miss Yough attended 
several workshops in movement education 
and in synchronized and speed swimming; 
in addition, she taught a workshop in move- 
ment education, in September 1967, for ele- 
mentary school teachers of Clarion County. 

Last year Miss Yough formed and taught 
the nucleus of a synchronized swimming 
class. The class, v.hich was held at the Brook- 
ville Y, was planned as the start of a syn- 
chronized swimmin,.; program in the new col- 
lege natatorium. She also formed the first 
ski club at Clarion State and was the club 
sponsor from 1960 to 1966. 

In addition to her leadership in physical 
education. Miss Yough was .serving her se- 
cond term as an elected member of the Fa- 
culty Senate. She was also an accomplished 
oboist and clarinetist and in 1960 played in 
the College Symphony Orchestra. 

The Reverend David J. Lutz of the Campus 
Ministry will give the beuedictioa. 



Arrangements have been made to create 
1 scholarship in memory of Gloria Yough, 
associate professor of health and physical 
education, who died i:\ August. Friends of 
Miss Yough in both Jic college and the com- 
munity may make ;!ifts in her name to the 
Clarion State College Scholarship Fund. 

A scholarship in hor memory is appropriate 
not only becau.se of ihc high regard in which 
Miss Yough was h';ld by her colleagues and 
her students but also because, on a number 
of occasions, she helped out, anonymously, 
students who were in financial need. 

The college scholarship fund is adminis- 
tered by the Office of Financial Aid, which 
is un-der the direction of Robert C. Scgc- 
barth. 

Last week a number of faculty members 
paid tribute to Miss Yough: 

Pearl Bonner: 'Gloria believed Ln a dream 
for a new kind of education for children in a 
gym. I know that she was often fearful that 
this program would not be successful. But 
she went on belie\ing and working toward 
her goal. '■ 

Peggy Curry: "As a teacher of a graduate 
class, Gloria was exciting. As a teacher of 
children, Gloria was soft-spoken and patient. 
She valued each child as an individual and 
belie\ed in self-improvement for each child." 

Helen Knuth: "It's not going to be easy 
to find s,)meone to take Gloria's place. She 
had the unusual combination of a first-rate 
intelligence, a real interest in scholarship, 
good common sens?, the ability to enjoy life 
and to enjoy her work, and a genuine con- 
cern for other people. She was fun to be 
with and was a real addition to any social 
gathering." 

Pauline Wiberg: "I remembc- Gloria as 
such a warm, friendly person with kind con- 
sideration for all. a per.son with a great 
sense of humcir. making o;!ch meeting with 
her a pleasure " 

Students also p liJ tribute to Miss Yough: 
Louis Mete: "Any student who has had 
the good fortune to have .Miss Gloria Yough 
a-j an instructor, as I did, surely must realize 
what a great loss we share, and how sin- 
cerely we will miss her She had a unique 
quality in the devotion she portrryed as a 
teacher, in the interest she showed in her 
students, and in the friendly attitude she 
always had both in and out of class." 

Roberta Baum: "I found Miss Yough to 
be a very warm porson. Her death was an 
extreme shock to me. as it was my first 
experience m losmn a very competent teach- 
er and also a close friend." 



Fine Arts 
Cornerstone 
Is Placed 



In a ceremony which was threatened at 
the start by light rain, the corncr,stone of 
the new Fine Arts Center was laid Thursday, 
September 19. 

The program began with the playing of 
the national anthem by the Clarion Stale 
College Marching Band, under the direction 
of Dr. Stanley F. I'^iichalski. Then the Rev. 
Dr. Eldon K. Somers of the Campus Ministry 
gave the invocation, in which he spoke of 
the Fine Arts Center as a "pulpit of artistic 
and dramatic college achievements. " Preced- 
ing the introduction of the guests by the 
program's host. Dr. Elbert R. Moses, Chair- 
man of the Department of Speech and Dra- 
matic Arts, was "Grace My Lovely One, 
Fair Beauties," sung by the Clrrion Madrigal 
Singers. Dr. Moses then presented Dr. James 
Gemmell, the president of Clarion State Col- 
lege, who spoke a few words about the build- 
ing it.self, stating that the new center would 
have two auditoriums with seating capacities 
of 1700 and 250, as compared with the audi 
torium now in use which has a capacity 
of 450 at the most. 

Representing the General State Authority 
v.as Robert E. Linker, executive assistant 
to Robert L. Kunzij, who discussed the many 
changes on state college campu.scs, Mr. Link- 
er ahso assured the judience of faculty mem- 
bers, college trustees and students that the 
building is progressing on schedule. The sch- 
eduled date for completion is July 31, 1969. 

Participating in tile trowelling ceremony, 
in which each person placed a trowel t)£ 
cement in the spaco reserved for the corner- 
stone, were President Gemmell; Mr. Linker; 
Mr. Joseph Spence, chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Art; Dr. Robert Van Meter, chair- 
man of the Department of Music; Dr. Moses; 
Mr. E. Clinton Stitt, Board of Trustees; Mr. 
Thomas J. Paolino. president of the Student 
Senate; and Miss Leslie Hudak. president 
of the Association of Women Students, 

Following the ceremony, .Mr. Stitt not"d 
that the Fine Arts Center is another milestone 
in the growth of Clarion Stato College, and 
that the trustees of Clarion were justifiably 
proud of that growth. The Madrigal Singers, 
under the direction of William M. McDonald, 
performed "Fire, Fire My Heart, " after 
which Rev. Somers gave the benediction. Clo- 
sing the program wis the Clarion State Col- 
lege Alma Mater. 



Registration 
fs Revised 



With the tolling of school bells across the 
nation, the students of Clarion State College 
returned to discover that registration, a once 
dreaded ordeal, has been revised. A process 
once requiring hours of standing in lines was 
reduced to a reasonably small amount of 
time. 

There are 2,912 full-time undergraduate 
.students enrolled at Clarion this year, and 
there are 298 full-time undergraduate stu- 
dents enrolled at Venango. Clarion, this year, 
has 217 part-time students enrolled, and there 
are 47 part-time students enrolled at Venan- 
go. Full-time graduate students number 14. 
and there are 244 part-time graduate .students 
enrolled. Total enrollment numbers 3.732, ac- 
cording to Mrs. Pliyliis Elder, college regis- 
trar. 

In an interview with Bryce Gray, adminis- 
trative assistant to the Dean of Academic 
Affairs, it was discovered that 500 of the 
total enrollment registered early. On Friday, 
September 6, the band members, the football 
piayers, and the student residents registered. 
Seniors, who are student teaching this semes- 
ter registered by mail. By the fall of 1970, 
it is hoped that m^ny of the upperclassmen 
will be able to regl.iter by mail, and even- 
tually this will encompass all students. 

The congestion in the fees office vvill be 
hard to alleviate because of the number of 
students receiving scholarships and govern- 
ment loans. There is no way for the fees 
office to know the amount of a scholarship 
or a loan until the state sends these forms. 
More often than not. these forms do not 
reach the college until after registration. 

According to Mr. Gray, students of Clarion 
can not choose the clas.ses and professors 
they want because one class will become 
overcrowded and another class will have 
practically no students. Another problem is 
that students try to schedule all their classes 
in the morning or in tlic afternoon thus leav- 
ing too much time open. 

In the near future, schedule changes may 
all be made in the IBM room in Peirce 
Center. This would eliminate Uie moving from 
room to room only to discover a class just 
added is closed. 

Even though some improvements have been 
made, registration will never be a picnic, 
but will be made easier in the coming vears. 



Page 2 

■*i?— — 



THE CALL — Clarion State College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



Saturday, September 28, 1968 



Editorially 
Speaking 



Introducing: 'The Glad Year' 



A new century of learning has be- 
l gun here at (Marion State College— a 
I new beginning of academic and social 
j activities for all of usv^bo now find 
j ourselves on this campus. Both new 
and familiar faces surround us as we 
] prepare ourselves for what we hope 
' will be a goodyear — the "glad" year. 
The "glad" year includes an air of 
dignity, a de.sire for change,. and a need 
' tor successful accomplisliment. , Every 
segment of this college is lool^ng for 
and reaching towards greater |ieights 
' and more spectacular feats. |n foot- 
ball, for example, we look,i#rward to 
regaining our State Chamfionship 
, crown. Likewise, in drama Iin4 music, 
. we plan to have noteworthy=!'i^rform- 
! ances that will make our scHopl an out- 
standing contributor to the' fiije arts. 
The list could go on to includ^ even the 
i mo.st minute phase of lif'e on Campus, 
but the final conclusion points to one 



direction: we have an earnest desire to 
be singled out as a progressive student 
, body. Our policy, therefore, elimin- 
. ates mediocrity and paves the way for 
leadership, for recognition of top-notch 
achievement in each of our endeavors. 

The Call is being swept along with 
this new winning attitude. Conse- 
quently, we are striving for a student 
newspaper that will make each of us 
proud, that will keep us all informed 
of what is happening around us. We 
have a new advisor, a new staff, and 
new ideas to help achieve our goals. 
t We have all this, and yet we need help 
I — your help. We want and encourage 
I your ideas, your suggestions, and your 
, contributions. We therefore encourage 
I you, as students, to submit articles and 
letters to help make your Call a special 
I part of the "glad" year. 

I — C. W. 



The Young Politics 



As the election year of '1968 goes 
into its final months, one political de- 
velopment is becoming increasingly 
clear. This development is the en- 
trance of youth onto the American po- 
litical scene. One has only to read the 
front page of any newspaper or browse 
through the pages of one of the week- 
ly magazines to see the evidence. Amer- 
ican politics is fai becoming the re- 
sponsibility of young America. 

We at Clarion State .College must 

recognize our duty to take a,n active 

part in this political youth movement. 

As the voice of yoiang America grows 

louder, Clarion students must not fall 

rby the wayside in apathy,- And further- 

' more, we must not sanction the views 

and actions of a few college students 

, by our silence. When a small group 

. of misled college students display a 

I Viet Cong flag, the integrity of' all 

' college students is shaken. We at 

i Clarion must not be identified with 

this small irresponsible group of shal- 



j low thinkers. Instead we should make 
ourselves familiar with political ideol- 
ogies, issues, and candidates and make 
I ourselves be heard. We are obligated 
! as citizens of a democratic society to 
1 be well informed and active in its poli- 
I tical structure. 

We are fortunate enough at Clar- 
ion to have several organizations 
through which any student may be- 
come active in politics. We have chap- 
ters of Young Republicans and Young 
Democrats, and a college newspaper 
that is interested in the opinion of the 
student body. We also have a chapter 
of the Intercollegiate Conference on 
Government that provides a means for 
gaining insight into our government. 
The students of Clarion State College 
have no excuse for being ignorant of 
their nation's political processes. The 
opportunity is here; let's take advan- 
tage of it. 

— Ed Wozniak 



CHANGING SCHEDULES 

Milton! Thou should'st be living at this hour. 
Thy pen prophetically foretold the fate 
Of students changing schedules. This their dower, 
"They also serve who only stand and wait." 

D.C.-M 

CHANCE TO IMPROVE 

You don't like your schedule, professor? You want it re- 
arranged? 

Thank heaven there is at least a Schontz to have your program 
changed! 

D.C.-M. 



The Cla^on Call 

.CALL Ojiice^ Rqmn J, Harvey Hall 
Clarion Sl00^ol^e, Clarion, Penna. 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Carolyn Welesko 

BUSINESS MANAGER l Tom Smith 

NEWS EDITOR Sandy Diesel 

COPY EDITOR ^ Rosemary Slebodnik 

EXCHANGE EDITOR Peg Foley 

CIRCULATION MANAGER ..... Lynn Hannold 

CO-SPORTS EDITORS . Gene Herritt, Gary Andres 

Advisor: Richard K. Redfern 

iirNifi 

ipBinisnvAinA 

r^mA ( WWSPAPBR 

H\rA\ POBLISHBRS' 

' iflKMhATlOl 




LETTERS 



Tc the Students of Clarion State: 

As members of last year's Student Senate 
Social Commlltee and this year's Student Ac- 
tivities Committee, we were nther upset 
upon registering to learn that our social cal- 
endar had been radically revised without 
consulting us. Eiglitctu major changes were 
made for the first scmester-^our question is 
"Why?" 

On .April 24th and May 8th of List semester 
v/e arranged a social calendar within the 
limits of our budgets, which met with the 
approval of the Dean of Student Affairs of- 
fice. However, the schedule wag changed, 
and we feel that the students deserve to 
know why these ch.tnges wore made. 

The following is a list of the chftnges that 
were made: 

SEPTEMBER 11, dance— caiwcUed; 15— 
movie — cancelled; 20, dbitce^r-cancelLed; 28, 
dance with combo — changed to record hop. 

OCTOBER 6, movie scheduled which was 
NOT scheduled by committee; 18, dance with 
combo— cancelled; 20, splasfi party^Tiangeld 
to movie; ao— spook movies changed to 31st 
because of conflict. 

NOVEMBER 10, movie scheduled whiqh 
was NOT scheduled by committee; 16, dance 
in Chandler— changed to concert in gym; Iff, 
movie scheduled which was NOT schedulad 
by committee; 25, dance with combo— can- 
celled. » 

DECEMBER 6, skating party with recoiifs 
—changed to Christmas party io gym; fr, 
movie— changed to SUi; 14. Christmas Dante 
in Chandler— changed to 7th in gym; ]^, 
movie scheduled which was NOT scheduMd 
by committee. I 

JANUARY 18, dance scheduled which wis 
NOT scheduled by committee; 19, movte 
scheduled which was NOT scheduled by corti- 
mittee; 28, mixer in gym— cancelled; A., 
movie— cancelled. IT 

We tried to plan acuviues on dates whifn 
other activities were not occurring, and we 
specifically tried to schedule events on tHe 
weekends of away football games. As you 
know, the weekend of the 20-22 was devoid 
of the dance scheduled, except for a hastily 
scheduled emergency union dance, in spite 
of the fact that we h-id scheduled a combo in 



the gym for the weekend. No explanation has 
been given lor tills change, or for any other 
change. 

Who changed our schedule? In an attempt 
to find out, we met with Mrs. Vairo, one of 
tlie new deans of women, who did not know, 
and Dr. Elliott, who claimed that the calen- 
dar committee did it. We did not know such 
a committee existed. Dr. Elliott would not 
tell us, or could not tell us, who was on the 
committee. He said, "I don't know . . . I'm 
annoyed . . . see Tom Paolino, he seems to 
be running the Student Senate." We also 
asked Dr. Elliott why no dance was held on 
tlie 11th. He replied, "It was inappropriate. It 
did not fit, really ... It was just an oppor- 
tunity for upperclassmen to look over fresh- 
men women." Alter v/c tried to get answers 
and got none, and tried to emphasize our 
need for more activities, he told us, "I've 
been preaching this all along." Next we tried 
Dr. Nanovsky. When a.sked why there were 
deletions in our Calendar, he said, "I'll tell 
you why. No place to put them." 

In conclusion, we ao not know who changed 
the Social Committee's original schedule, or 
why; it was done behind our backs— and your 
baeks. We feci as your representatives we 
should let you know that this has happened, 
ao<J we appeal to you if you care about your 
social events to "ask Tom Paolino," and 
vvfioever else you must to find out who made 
the'Vhanges, and why. 

l- SUZAN ALBANEST. Chairman; 

BEV BANYAY, LINDA MASON 

--t-* 



Freshmen Face 



Annual Hazing 

This year, as in the past, freshmen are 
becoming acquainted with the campus and 
upperclassmen through the activity known 
as "Frosh Week." From September 24 
through September 28, the freshmen are re- 
ceiving the undivided attention of the student 
body. The rules are basically the same as 
last year's, with two innovations. 

Ill the Administration tsuilding, outside the 
library, is located the Abused Freshman Ar- 
ea. Anyone who feels he is being persecuted 
may bring his complaints to this area. There, 
understanding students wiU stencil the words 
"abused freshman" on the complainant's 
sign. 

As a protective device against overzealous 
upperclassmen, 45 students have been named 
as Frosh Week Leaders. These students pa- 
trol the campus to prevent incidents. Anyone 
getting out of hand will 'be reported for die- 
ciptinary action. 

Kangaroo Court is held every evening, pre- 
sided over by Head Judge Ray (Hoot Owl) 
Lenzi. Other members of the tribunal are 
Greg Pierce, Bill Abbott, Larry Stiner, Jim 
Hubert, and Jerry Muzyka. 

At the pep rally tonight, there may be 
a bonfire in which the freshmen will be per- 
mitted to consign their signs to the flames. 



Mel Allen, well known sports caster, has 
been elected president of the Sports Broad- 
caster's association for the third time in the 
IC-year history of the organization. 



freshman Orientation 



Calendar of 
Coming Events 

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27 

—Pep Rally, Chandler Dining HaU, 

7:15 p.m. 
— "Hootenanny," Student Union 

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28 

—Clarion vs. Geneva, College Memorial 

Stadium, 1:30 p.m. 
—Band Day at halftime 
—Record Hop, Gym Balcony, 8:30 p.m. 

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 30 

—Freshman Football, Clarion vs. Indiana, 
College Memorial Stadium, 3 p.m. 

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1 

—Quarterback Club Dinner, Chandler, 
6:30 p.m. 

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2 

—Geographical Society, Planetarium Aud. 
—Play: "After the Fall," Chapel, 8:30 p.m. 

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3 

—Play: After the Fall," Chapel, 8:30 p.m. 

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4 ♦ ^ 

—Play: After the FaU," ^k^l. ,ft30 p.m^ 



1 



:LIiL 



What They Did 

A six-day orientation program for new stu- 
dents at Clarion State College was launched 
Friday, September 6, in the college chapel 
with workshops for orientation leaders, re- 
sident assistants and head residents in pre- 
paration for the beginning of classes Septem- 
ber 12. 

Workshop planners established a ratio of 
one leader for every 10 new students in view 
of the 550 new faces expected. The student 
leader group checked in Friday afternoon 
aud attended an evening picnic at Piney Mea- 
dows, near Clarion. 

Saturday's events included a breakfast for 
the leaders and continuation of the workshop 
with an address on "Clarion's Future" by 
Dr. David A. Hilton, assistant to the presi- 
dent. 

The first new students arrived on campus 
Saturday, met with their orient:ition leaders 
and were guests at a welcome dinner and 
orientation dance in the evening. 

Church worship, .student affairs orientation 
and student discussion groups featured Sun- 
day's program, v/itli the President's Recep- 
tion at Chandler Hall, as the climax. 

Monday's highligiits were an academic af- 
fairs orientation, modern language placement 
tests and swimming placement tests. Also 
the first of the now group began registration 
a* the Administration Building Monday after- 
noon at 1 p.m. A meeting with the campus 
ministry and movies in the chapel rounded 
out the day. 

Modem language placement tests, swim- 
ming placement, and registration were con- 
tinued on Tuesday, and there was a hooten- 
anny that night. 

Further testing, registration, and question- 
naires made up the bulk of Wednesday's 
program, in preparation for the first day 
• of, 4asses, Thursday, September 12. 



What They Thought 

A small survey of freshmen who had under- 
gone the orientation process was made to 
determine their opinions of the Clarion pro- 
gram. 

The first question asked was, "What part 
of the program do ycu feel was best pre- 
sented?" Most of the freshmen interviewed 
felt that the tours of the campus were the 
best conducted. Several freshmen contended 
that the president's reception and dinner were 
the -highlight of the program. Third choice 
v^as the student activities orientation. 

The second question asked in the survey 
v/as, "Do you feel that the program helped 
to prepare you for college life?" There were 
a few negative responses, but the majority 
or freshmen interviewed felt that orientation 
helped them to adapt to the life at Clarion 
State. The ways in which they felt they had 
been helped were varied; introductions to 
proniinent administrr.tors and students, infor- 
mation on social and athletic activities, lo- 
cation of- classrooms. Several freshmen were 
grateful to the orientation leaders who took 
time to introduce them to the intricacies 
of registration. 

Finally, those interviewed were asked, "Do 
you have any suggestions for improvement 
of the program?" The response was an over- 
whelming "Yes!" Some felt that orientation 
speakers should either speak louder or get 
a better public address system. Others sug- 
gested that the welcoming speeches should 
be cut and much of the repetition eliminated, 
the reason being that much information was 
lost in the volume. 

It [was suggested that more time be spent 
on campus tours. Several freshmen thought 
that the orientation leaders needed more 
training. A second-semester freshman sug- 
gested that some kind of orientation be pro- 
vided for incoming freshmen in January. 
And, last but not least, there was the fresh- 
man girl who suggested that "Clarion should 
get more comfortable bleachers at the athle- 
tic field and in the gym." 



Debaters 
Hopeful 



Clarion State College is looking forward" to 
another highly successful year for its debat- 
ers. Many of la.st year's varsity debaters will 
lie returning, iu addition to what Dr. R.' A. 
llufford, director of forensics, calls the larg- 
est novice group that has shown interest in 
years. 

The topic to be argued this year is: Re- 
solved, that executive control of foreign pol- 
icy should be signific-ntiy curtailed. 

In a practice debate held on September 19, 
Mary Lou McCauliff and Betty Ferguson (af- 
firmative), and Kay Berkey and Judy Bran- 
dalick (negative), demonstrated their skills. 
These girls were all award winning debaters 
last year. Miss McCauliff of Johnstown took 
top oratory prize at State; Mis.s Ferguson of 
Gibsonia took fifth, while both were on the 
teem which placed second in the state tourna- 
ment. Miss Berkey of Jennerstown and Miss 
Brandalick of Bethel Park won the third place 
trophy at Illinois State. They also received a 
special recognition plaque from William and 
Mary College for their outstanding record of 
7-1 there. Pat Dobson of Penn Hills, a mem- 
ber of last semester'." second place team, is 
another of the varsity debaters returning tliis 
year. 

The first novice tournament of the year 
will be at Dickin.son College in Carlisle, Pa., 
on October 12. Tlie varsity debaters have 
been invited to two tournampnts on the 18th 
and 19th of October at Northern Illinois Uni- 
versity at De Kalb and at the University of 
Detroit. These are both limited meets with 
teams from all ovor the country attending. 

Dr. Hufford is pleased with the number 
and quality of debaters this scme.ster. He has 
said that the tentative schedule for the year 
is a difficult one, with no other college in • 
the East facing such competition. Dr. Hufford 
will head the National Debate Tournament 
in 1969. 



Horoscope 

Many people are wondering what the future 
holds for them. Well, follow your star, CSC 
students, and you'll find what the 1968-69 
school year has tc offer you: 

CAPRICORN (Bom Dec. 22— Jan. 19): 
Your enthusiastic and sociable nature allows 
you to be a good director, teachor, or leader. 
Beware of people vvhc try to deceive you. 
or oppose your po'iition of authority. Look 
for love in June, it will prove true. 

AQUARIUS (Born Jan. 20— Feb. 18): You 
are aware of what's happening. Though you 
are a devoted friend, and you are able to 
help solve problems, you do not know how 
to handle your own money. For this reason, 
you may find yourself in great financial trou- 
ble this year. 

PISCES (Feb. 19— March 20): Your sensi- 
tivity and unselfishness make you subject 
to displays of temper. You attract many 
friends and have what some might call "sex 
appeal." Be prepared for an exciting autumn. 
Summer means a new romance for you. 

ARIES (March 21— April 19): You are very 
inward. Spend a lot of time this year trying 
to iind what it's all about. Tread lightly 
through November; it may be a tragic month 
fcr you. 

TAURUS (April 20— May 20): You are in- 
tuitive and stand behind every decision you 
make. Seldom can your outlook be changed. 
Into your highly materialistic life may come 
love. Accept it willingly; you will be glad 
you did. 

GEMINI (May 21— June 20): You give sym- 
pathy when needod, and dcnKmd it when 
you feel its need. You seek out those who 
are above you intellectually, and lend to dis- 
like those who are mentally inferior to you. 
Look out for your health. Athletes, play each 
game with caution. 

CANCER (June 21— July 22): Ycu are lead- 
ing an eventful lifct Be careful not to act 
too much on impulse. Use alcohol and sleep- 
inducing drugs cautiously. 

LEO (.luly 23— Aug. 22): You are unusually 
patient and ambitious. Ycu love clothes, orna- 
ments, and people. You will find many loves 
this year, but ignore them. Your education 
should come first. 

VIRGO (Aug. 23— Sept. 22): You are both 
tactful and forgiving. Because of these quali- 
ties you are experiencing great emotional 
stress. Do not despair if you find yourself 
alone. This situation should last only until 
mid-October. 

LIBRA (Sept. 23— Oct. 22): You are very 
independent and talk tco much. Even though 
you want to break family ties, try to be 
home this weekend. Do not look for marriage 
for a long while. 

SCORPIO (Oct. 23— Nov. 21): Your friends 
consider you successful. You will have tlie 
oppOTtimity to make money, but you may 
have to gamble. Look for a love affair this 
winter. , 

SAGITARRIUS (Nov. 22— Dec. 21): Your 
charm can win you almost anything you 
want. You will need to look for religion, 
aiid it is to your advantage to do so. 



Saturday, September 28, 1968 



THE CALL — Clarion Stirte CoUefe, Clarion. Pennsylvania 



Pace 3 



i>» 



Orpheum Sets Special 
Bargam Night Show 

Oarion's Orpheum theater announces a 
bargain night to be held on Wednesday, Oct- 
obCT 2. CSC students will be admitted to 
the theater for 50 cents. The featured attrac- 
tion will be "Luv" starring Jack Lemmon. 
Larry Murphy, manager, announced that this 
reduced rate was arranged for the benefit 
of students. ContinuatiMi of this practice will 
be determined by stud^rt atteodance. 



k****«i 



lA^^^^^Mik^^ki 



>^>^dk^^i^i^^k^i^ 



Gemmell Stresses 
Good Teaching 
At Orientation 



Of the three traditional functions of tile 
college and university. Claron State CoUfge 
should emphasize excellence in teaching. Se- 
cond priority should be given research and 
tljird priority to community service. Hiese 
points were highlights of "A Matter of Prior- 
ity," a talk given by President James Gem- 
mell to new faculty members at a faculty 
orientation meeting on September 5. 

"Our first order of business is to foster 
on our campus the best possible means con- 
ducive to learning," said Dr. Gemmell. He 
stressed, however, the importance of re- 
search, which he called a re-interpretsttdn 
and enrichment of knowledge and culture. 
He said also that the college will continue 
to get requests for community service but 
that the college can not "be all things to 
all people." 

In his talk he reviewed college progress 
during the past year and forecast some of 
the changes ahead on "a campus on which 
Uie concrete never seems to set." The con- 
tinued physical growth of the college, Dr. 
Gemmell said, makes even more vital the 
necessity for wise teaching and leadership 
of a student body which is "the best pre- 
pared, most educablc, most lively in the his- 
tory of education." 

The challenges and pressures which stu- 
dents on today's campuses feel make it ne- 
cessary, he said, for the faculty to "look 
at student dissent with the eyes of schol^p 
and the wisdom of the ages." AUhough CUr- 
ion State has been relatively calm, "We can't 
count on its remaining so. And I don't Irapw 
that we should wish it so." 

Dr. Gemmell added, however, that "the 
right to dissent is not a permit to stage 
sil-downs, to intimidate, to use violence, or 
tc be disrespectful of others." 

Before Dr. Gemmell spoke. Dr. John Mel- 
lon, dean of liberal arts, introduced depart- 
ment chairmen, who introduced ne* mem- 
bers of the faculty and staff. 

In the afternoon session of September 5, 
new members of the faculty and others at- 
tended a panel discussion entitled "The Col- 
lege and the Disadvantaged" in the CoUege 
chapel. The speakers were Al Mellman, di- 
rector of the Jewish Community Relations 
Council in Pittsburgh; Dr. Kenneth V^ydili, 
director of special education at the coI|ef4; 
and two representatives of the Pennsylyanla 
Human Relations Commission: Dolores Rozzi 
and Eugene V. Nelson. 

The moderator of tlie discussion wai De'ttn 
Mellon. After short talks by each member 
of the panel, there were questions and com- 
ments from the audience. Some questions 
dealt with statemeq.ts ab<mt the WA5P cuj- 
ture, its strength aud weaknesses: (WASP 
is an acronym for "white Anglo-Saxon pro- 
tfestant.") - ' 

.,0h September 6, the second day of oHeo' 
tation for. new faculty members, they hfgird 
explanations of the advisement program, the 
communication services, and the counseUng 
services. Iii addition, they heard an explana- 
tion of employee benefits by a representative 
of the Pennsylvania Department of Public 
Instruction. 

That evening new teachers and staff mem- 
bers were entertained at a dinner by other 
teachers and administrators who were not 
new. After dinner, they ate dessert with. Pre- 
sident and Mrs. Gemmell in the Gemmells' 
apartment in Music Hall. 

Theater Group 

- 1' 

Plans Program 

Fresh from last year's highly successful 
season, the College Readers (formerly the 
Readers' Theater) are embarking upon an 
even more strenuous program which they 
hope win be even more of a success. Under 
the direction of their advisor, Dr. Mary Hard- 
wick, they plan for this year two major pro- 
ductions (one late this semester, the other In 
early spring) and a group of smaller studio 
productions. 

College Readers are also planning tours of 
other colleges and universities, incktdilig 
temple, Penn State, and Westminster; also 
in the offing is a possible tour of England 
fpr one of the groups. In addition, the College 
Readers say they have a secret project which 
will start late in October. 

As evidence of their full schedule, five of 
their members — Ken Miller, Jackie Gerard, 
CeCe Carter, Mike Elliott, and Patrick Fitz- 
gerald — are attending a readers' workshop 
this weekend at Kutztown State College. 
There they are performing T. S. Eliot's "The 
Wasteland. 

Student Senate Officers 
Plan Seven Committees 

., Officers for the Student Senate for the 1968- 
69 school year are Tom Paolino, president; 
Bob Doman, vice pr^jsident; Don Kress, fin- 
anpe chairman; and Sue Albanesi, social 
eommittee chairman. Senators include Judy 
Macuga, Judy Brandalick, Marg Butler, Ca- 
rol Johnson, Harvey Hull, Pam Mattern, Tony 
Mattem, and Thom Werthman. 

This year Student Senate will set up seven 
policy-making committees, composed of stu- 
dents and faculty, wiiich will deal with many 
aspects of college life at Clarion, including 
social activities, food, housing, and fraterni- 
ties and sororities. Student Senate meetings 
are open to all students; these meetings are 
held every Wednesday evening at 6i30 in 
the Student Senate room in Becht HaU. 



DEAN'S LIST 1968 



SPRING SEMESTER i Vea/s Events Jack Blaine Is Named 



AbN. Bonnie J. 


S.6T 


A<<«pi«ta, ElMOIor A. 


•4.M 


Alcorn, J»niea M. 


9.n 


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Altm'an. Ju4y Ann 


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8.W 


^flAfrmtA. Cai'M) 


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Ar*W»»», OvvU W. 


S.10 


Ai-mbru»»rv Paul C. 


S.«|B 


AUitn«. UiXtiori* A. 


IS 


0alrd, D«kor4h L,- 


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»urtti, Margttrvl M. 


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Bei-^cey. Kaj« H- 


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MuciynakI, Trancea 

McHenry, Margaret 

McHuKh. nl'iirUyn R, 

clttuffhlln, Oierl 

Mcl..dUKhUn, Cheryl 

McNeill. Charlea O. 

MlUburn, Charlea 

MUter, Kenneth A. 

Mincemoyer, Nancy 

Muldoon. Willkim J. 

Ntllaoti, Thoinaa J. 

NelUon, Rtrhurd R. 

Nelson, John D. 

Nevel. Christine A. 

Nicely, Bonnie A. 

Noel. Ada L. 

Norris, Jill Ann 

Notto, Harry 

Oakea, Nanct ^. 

Ohrman, Jane T. 

Otsoin. Margery JB. 

Oneil, Oennia Lee 

Oneill, Lola E. 
Orria. CalhJeen J. . 

Ptt, Mary R. 

Packer, Linda P. 

P*ckurd, Su.san I. 

I^iirks, Mary Ann 

Parulo, Paul F. 

Patton. Patricia A. 

Patton, Robert L. 
Peirce, Jill Ann 

Pelican. Barbara A. 
Pergola, Phillip R. 

peters, Ronald A. 
Peterson, Paul K. 

Pfannenschmldt, Chas. 

f^hillips, Sandra L. 

Philllpa, wnlls V. 

Pickett, J one M. 

Plockl. Kathleen A. 

Pollock, Sandra L. 

Poiskl, Bernard J. 

Popcke, ChrUta H. 

puryear, Cortez 

pyle, MarUyn D. 

R^micone, . DenUe M. 

Ranlerl, JuUann C. 

Raptch, Louise A. 

Reese, James R. 

Reltx. Larry A 

Rhoads, Lyitn A. 

Rich, Nancy J. 

Rlckel, Francln* 

Rtddle, James R. 

RtdSnger, Glen C. J. 

Rocknlck, Mildred 

Riisenberry, Cheryl 

Ro^lanowiok. MarUyn 

Rostron, Georgette 

Rutherford, Nicola 

kabln, Robert G. 

Salem, Linda 

salopek, David J. 

Samko, Michael P. 

Santollquido, Lynn 

^arvey, Danette J. 

Schmader, Michael 

Schrecengost, Diane 

IScott, Dorothy S. 

Strrian, Martha J. 

jSeyler, Mlchale C. 

Shaffer, Carl D. 

Sbetfer, James R. 

8herren, Henry 

Shlrey, Jayne E. 

fehoup, Linda D. 

Shoup, Janet Faye 

Shotts, Susan S. 

Shrum , Judith L. 

Shultz, James A. 

Sickles, Linda K. 

SUvU. Mark L. 

Sivak, Patricia A. 

Skinner, Candac* L. 

Skirpan, Karen L. 

£Sater, Charles R. 

SlaUgeohaupt, Hele 

Slaligenhoup, Paul 

s'tnith. Judi^ A. 

Smith, SheryU Lef > 

smithy Thomas M. 

Smutzer, Ore^ry S. 

Sneibold, Richard C. 

S|>en.ce, Mary K. 

Staebler, Linda A- 

BtalUngs, Elizabeth 

atano, Antoinette 

Stark, Andrea R. 

Stelghner, Peggy A. 

Stiglitz, Jane L. 

Stitt, Judith Ann 

Stolec. MIchele R. 

Strlght, Linda M. 

Strater, Joseph L. 

Strum, Jerome" 

Swiirtz. G. Thomas 

Szylhkowiak, Simon* 

"faylor, Lola 

Teeters, Thomas R. 

Tegano, Marie E. 

Tigllo. Janice S. 

Tlerrvan, Scot AV. 

Trautman, George C. 

Truan, Karlh Li 

Trutik, Lol« Jean 

Uber, Donald R. 

Underwoon, Diannf 

Urey, Mary L. 

Vance, Joanne 

Verish, Barbara Jo 

Vock, Margaret A. 

Wagner, Norma J» 

Waid, Mary L. 

Walcott, Judith L. 

Waldeck, Louis F. 

W.iUer, Douglas B. 

Warner, Thomas W. 

Wasnelski, Anita 

Wleber, Becky 

Welifl, Mansel D. 

West, Gary A. 

Wheeler, Freda E. 

Vlberg, Pauline M. 

Williams, Laura 'A. 

Winfert, Carole A. 

Winters, Georgana 

Wteaner, Christine 

Wizbowski, VeTonlca 

Wolfe, Diann Fern 

WoodaU. K«U L. 

Woods, David 

Woolbaugh, Bonita 

Yates, TwUa V. 

Yothers, Sharyn P. 

Young, Kathleen A. 

Yusko. Gary E. 

Zacherl, EUeen P. 

Zajac. Marilyn A. 

Zvonik, Martha 

VENANGO CAIfPUS 

Bruner, Daniel P. 

DeAuguatino,' Janice 

Dudreck, Diane 

Edwards. Gary . . 

Harriger, Linda L. 

Kolojejchick, John 

Kraft, Rose Harter 

Lauer, Linda D. 

Lavery. David Lee 

McGinty, Terrence 

Mtnnlck, Sally L. 

Novak, Patricia 

Oneil, Peggy Ann 

Painter, Sandra E. 

Rosa, Deborah Lynn 

Rutka, Alexis M. 

Southwlck, Linda J. . 

WaClgh, Sara Jane 

WilUamson, Pamela 

Yerg, Ann Adeline 



In Music 



Acting Director of Planetarium 



S 



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i'*a faculty recitals and seven concerts by 
hiitrumental aM vocal groups will be fea- 
tured in the list of coming musical events at 
Clarion State College for 1968-69, according 
to Pr. Robert Van Meter, chairman of the 
i^c Department. 

f*e to the public, all concerts and recitals 

^A^U be at 8 p.m. Band, choir and orchestra 

ediie»rts will be in Tippin Gymnasium while 

ftcillty recitals will be in the College Chapel. 

The 8<^hedule of musical events is as fol- 

^^ OctoJtwr 1ft— Faculty Recital: Vahe Berber- 
iatt, cello. 
**^ October 30— Faculty Recital: Milton Lazich, 
bast. 

November ft— Orchestra Concert: Edward 
."^Hottcooe, conductor. 
4( November 14 — Marching Band Concert: 
^ta^y F. Michalski, Jr., director. 
P* iMcember 4— Faculty Recital: Robert Van 
Meter, piano. 

^ December 1ft— Ou-istmas Concert, Concert 
^oir and Orchestra: William M. McDonald, 
Conductor. j 

■, January 8— Fmculty Chamber Music Re- 
cital. 

February 5— Faculty Recital: David Mal- 
lory, violin. 

February 19— Faculty Recital: Janet Ber- 
beriao, soprapo. 

March 5— Faculty Recital: Christian Boh- 
leo, clarinet. 

M«rch 19— Concert Band: Stanley F. Mich- 
«Ukl, Jr., director. 

if arch 26— Faculty Recital: Annette Rous- 
sel-^eiche, piano. 

M#reh 31— Concert Choir:. Milton Lazich, 
conductor. 

April »— Faculty Recital: Burton Hardin, 
horo. 

April 13— Orchestra Ccwicert: Edward Ron- 
eoQ«, conductor. 

May 7— Faculty Chamber Music Recital. 

May 11— Concert Band: Stanley F. Michal- 
ski, Jr., director. 

Student Union Painted; 
i^ore Equipment Coming 

The Student Union, located in Harvey Hall, 
has been renovated over the summer. The 
iakGk bar uqw contains an enclosed small 
eating area, a free juke box for the students' 
use, and it uses disposable cups and plates. 
la addition, the union has been painted to 
provide a more attractive atmosphere. Other 
anticipated changes include a high speed 
gl^iH, a drinks window, and air-conditioning. 
; The upstairs loimge and billiards area is 
scbedided to open on Homecoming day, Octo- 
ber 12. =■•.;-■. ^■:: :\ 



Jack N. Blaine, assistant professor of phy- 
sical science, has been named acting director 
of the college planetarium, it ha.s been an- 
nounced by Dr. James A. Gemmell, college 
president. 

A native of Ml. Plea.sant. Blaine has been 
a member of the Clarion State faculty since 
1966. He received his B.S. degree at Clarion 
and the Master of Science at Antioch College, 
Yellow Springs, Ohio. He has done additional 
graduate work at Penn State University and 
the University of Pittsburgh. 

Blaine has been a teacner at Cranberry 
High School, Seneca, and at Rocky Grove 



High School, Franklin. During the past sum- 
mer he attended a four-week institute for 
planetarium directors at the State University 
College at Oswego, New York. 



The average January temperature in Reyk- 
javik, Iceland, is 32 degrees. This high tem- 
perature is caused by the proximity of the 
Gulf Stream. 




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Page 4 



THE CALL — Clarion State College, Clarion. Pennsylvania 




Saturday, September 28 1968 



A Peek At Greeks 



Saturday. September 28, 1968 



THE CALL 



Clarion State College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



Page 3 



Clarion Stpte College 
Golden Eagle Marching Band 

DR. SI ANLEY F. MICHALSKI, Director 

Mr. Rex Mitchell, Arranger — Mr. Chris Smith, Band President 
Mr. Cortez Puryear, Drum Major — Miss Janice Hoffman, Golden Girl 

BAND PERSONNEL 



Name, I'la-.s, liisti umrnt 



Hometown Name, Class, Instrument 



Home'awn 



Allaniiin. Ronald; Sr., Sousa^honfe Murrysvilfc 
Andiews, Susan; Jr., Clarinet Reno 

Angove, Douglas; Sr., ManaKci Warreii 

Ay IS. Evehn; Fr., Baritone Saxophone 

Elversbn 
Baldridge, Charles; Fr., Cornet Pittsburgh 

Balogh, William; Fr., Tenor ^a|t(»p(M)ne 

' ' Finleyville 
Banjak, Carol.vn; Sr., Clarinet Sharon 

Barrett, Curti.s; Ji , Sousaphone Corsica 

Bates. Craig; Jr., Drums Latrobo 

Becker, Frank; Jr. Cornet"' Bristol 

Beckstine. Melindai Soph., Flute Greenville 

Bickei staff. Donna; Sr., Clarinet Beaver Falls 
Bigle,v, Mary Jane; Soph., Clarinet Clarion 

Blair. Donna; Soph., Flute Franklin 

Blough, Ellen; Jr., Alto Saxophone Jerome 

Bonanti, Candy; Soph., Chirlnet .. . Fairview 
Bowser, John; Fr., Drums'"' North Apollo 

Brooks, Susan; Jr., Baritone YounKsville 

Burgoson, Kathy; Soph., Trombone Bradford 
Chamberlin, Linda; Soph., Clarinet Watsontown 
Chessman, William; Sr., Clarinet Pittsburgh 

Culp. Hubert; Jr., Drums Oil City 

Curley, Elizabeth; Soph., Baritone Johnstown 
Daniels, Christopher; Sr.. Clarinet Bessemer 
Deacon, Barbara; Fr., Alto Saxophon*" 

Lakewood, N. J. 

Dehner, Ronald; Soph., Cornet Oil City 

Delp, M.iriannc; Fr., Baritone Rimcrsburg 

Dcir, Robert; Soph., Clarinet Pittsburgh 

Doollttle, Clinton; Sr., Sous.iphone .Greenville 

Ebner, Jane; Fr., Clarinet Mars 

Falstick, Brenda; Sr.j Clarinet Johnstown 

Garmong, Jane. in; Soph., Alto Clarinet 

Leechburg 
Goissinger, Wayne; Soph., Clarinet Wexford 

Gilfert, Linda; Soph., Eb Clarinet Pittsburgh 

Graham, Terry; Sr.,- Trombone , Zelienople 

Grinder, Karen; Soph., Flute Harmony 

Harriger, Linda; Jr, Flute Seneca 

Hartman, William; Jr., Cornet . N. Cumberland 
Hepler, Lowell; Fr., Sousaphone Sligo 

Hoffman, Janice; Sr.. Golden Girl Aliquippa 
Huffman, Charles; Jr., Bass Clarinet 

Marienville 
Hupp, Thomas; Soph., Clarinet . . Ellwood City 

Itzoe, Samuel; Sr., Baritone New Freedom 

Jenkins, Raymond; Sr., Clarinet Rochester 

Jenkins, Terry; Fr., Cornet ..:.. Lansdale 

Johnson, Carol; Sr., Piccolo Erie 

Karg, Rich.ird; Jr., Trombone Seneca 

King, David; Soph., Drums Babylon, N. Y. 

Knox, Judi; Soph., Manager Pittsburgh 

Koziar, John; Fr., Drums . .J.^ Scotland, Pa. 

Kress, Donald; Sr., Trombone .'. Zelienople 

Kuzcmchak, Cyntliia; Fr., Clarinet Clymer 

Kypt.i, J.imcs; Soph., H.orn 
Laube, Cathy; Fr., Clarinet 
I-.iury, Dorothy: Jr., M.ijoictte 



Pittsburgh 
Brookvillc 
Pittsburgh 



Lindell, Gloria; Soph., Alto Saxophone Russell 



Linton, Nancy; Fr.. Clarir«?t Atglen 

Logue, Lawrence; Soph., Cornet Johnsonburg 
McAdams, Nina; Jr., Flute .-. New Castle 

McCall, Kerry; Soph., Majorette Shippenville 
McGuire, Linda; Fr., Tenor Saxophone Sarver 
McKelvey, James; Fr., Alto Saxophone 

Kittanning 
McNulty, Kenneth; Fr., Drums Pittsburgh 

Miller, Cathy; Soph., Cornet Rockwood 

Mitchell, Leonard; Sr., Clarinet Beaver Falls 
Morford, Gary; Fr., Alto Saxophone 

Natrona Heights 
Mortimer, Dennis; Fr., Sousaphone Creighton 

Murphy, Glenn; Sr., Cornet New Castle 

Nash. Ronnie: Soph., Drums North E.ist 

Oglesby, Claus; Soph., Cornet Emlenton 

OzeUa, Gasper; Soph., Alto Saxophone 

Freeport 

Postler, Kathy; Fr., Clarinet Coraopolis 

Preffer, Ralph; Jr., Sousaphcne Pittsburgh 

Proud. Jay; Soph., Clarinet Warren 

Puryear, Cortez; Sr., Drum Major . . Pittsburgh 
Richards, Nancy; Soph., Bass Clarinet 

Harbor Creek 
Riddle, Susan; Jr.. Clarinet Butler 

Roach, Joanne; Soph., Clarinet Thomasville 

Schmadei, Cyril; Soph., Baritone Lucinda 

Schneider, Jacob; Fr., Trombone .. Pittsburgh 
Schrecengost, Connie; Sr., Majorette Clarion 

Searight. Randy; Fr., Sousaphone Erie 

Selker, Judy; Jr., Horn Shippenville 

Seng, Thomas; Sr., Drums Pittsburgh 

Severance, Bill; Soph., Sousaphone Ridgway 

Sherrieb, Linda; Fr., Clarinet North East 

Shollenberger, James; Soph., Cornet Sharpsville 
Sinibaldi, Elizabeth; Fr., Tenor Saxophone 

St. Marys 

Smith, Chris; Jr., Sousaphone Johnstown 

Smyers, Dennis; Fr., Trombone Gardners 

Squiie, Beverly; Fr., Flute Turtle Creek 

Stahlman, Paul; Fr., Cornet Fairmount City 

Stefanik,. Leila; Fr., Drums North Apollo 

Steis, Janet; Soph., Majorette St. Marys 

Sterner, Dennis: Fr., Trombone H.inover 

Stumpf, William; Soph., Sousaphone Butler 

Trudgen, Larry; Fr., Cornet Klttanning 

Trunzo, James; Soph., Announcer Leechburg 

Tytke, Jackie; Soph., Majorette Irwin 

Valentine, Susan, Fr., Clarinet Genesee 

Wagoner, Donna; Fr., Majorette Darlington 

Wedekind, Loraine; Jr., Clarinet Shippenville 
Weible, David; Sr., Cornet Falls Creek 

Weis, Robert; Soph., Cornet Morrisville 

Whiteshot, Mary; Fr., Flute .' Warren 

Winkler, Eugene; Soph., Trombone Emlenton 
Winters, Owen; Jr., Baritone Brookville 

Wolfinger, Donna; Sr.. Clarinet Philadelphia 

Wright, Jeffry; Fr., Trombone Irwin 

Yonker, Cheryl; Fr., Cornet Ridgway 

Young, John; Soph., Baritone Glfford 






CSC Band 
Impresses 

Crowd 



The Clarion Stato College Band, under. the 
direction of Dr. Stanley F. IMich.ilski, mat^ 
its first appearance i;t the hjilf-timc of the 
Clarion-Manslield game, September 14. 

The theme of the first half-time show was 
"A Day at the County Fair." 

The band .started with a new entrance and 
precision drill, heightened by the perfor- 
mance of the drutn major, Cortez Puryear. 
to the mu.sic of •%'s r Big Wide Wonderful 
World." The bandftlion formed a race track 
and played "Can^itov.n Races." Next the 
band formed a stage as part of the midway 
activities at the fiir. and to the music of 
"The Stripper." t!ie tuba players did an ap- 
propriate dance. 

Following thi.s. tho hand formed two large 
circles and did an intricate maneuver, with 
knee-bending, and long streamers to portray 
a carou.sel. Forming a "72," the band wel- 
comed the Class of 1972 with the music, 
"When the Saints Go Marching In." Tlie 
■show ended with :;,e traditional formation 
of CSC and the playing and singing of the 
Alma Mater. 



Michalski Publishes Article 

Dr. Stanley F. Michalski, professor of mu- 
jiic and director of bands at Clarion State 
College, has recently had an article published 
ill the first edition of the West Virginia Mu- 
sic Educators Associrtion Bulletin. The title 
of the paper was "The State of Musician- 
ship." It dealt with the music education pro- 
gram and its effect on the students in the 
school system in the state of West Virginia. 

Michalski Picks Band Front 

As a result of tryouts which were held 
recently, these students have been selected as 
members of the Clarion State College Band 
Front by Dr. Stanley F. Michalski, director 
of bands. 

The drum major is Cortez Puryear, a sen- 
ior from Pittsburgh; Janice Hoffman, a sen- 
ior from Aliquippa. is Clarion's Golden Girl; 
head majorettes are Connie Schrecengost, a 
senior from Clarion, and Dorothy Lawry, a 
junior from Pittsburgh. New majorettes in- 
clude sophomores Kerry McCall of Clarion, 
Jackie Tytke of Irwin, Donna Wagoner of 
Darlington, and Janet Strcis of St. Mary's. 

Staff Extends Thanks 

The staff of the Clarion Call would like 
to extend a thank-you to all those who have 
helped in tlie publication of our first issue. 
A special thanks goes to Mr. Richard Red- 
fern, our advisor, Mr. Henry L. Fueg for 
the photographs, and to Mr. William Proud- 
fit for the use of his news releases. 



Second Annual Band Day 
To Be Held Tomorrow 



Clarion will host its Second Annual Band 
Day on September 28. Thirteen high school 
bands will participate in the show which will 
be presented during half time at the Clarion- 
Geneva game. The schools participating are 
Clarion Limestone Area Schools, Conneaut 
Lake Area Schools, Conneaut Valley High 
School, Forest Area Schools, Fort LeBoeuf 
High School, Grove City High School, Har- 
mony High School, Hickory Township High 
School, Marion Center Area High School, 
Mars Area Junior-Senior High School, North 
Clarion County Jurior-Scnior High School, 
Northwestern High School, and Port Allegany 
High School. 

This year Dr. Stanley F. Michalski, Direc- 
tor of Bands at Clarion, has planned a for- 
mation of the letters CSC. In this formation 
the bands will play "El Capitan March," 
"Autumn Leaves," "Song for the Young," 
"American the Beautiful," "Alma Mater," 
and "Washington Post March." 

Mr. Rex Mitchell, a member of Clarion's 
music staff, has again written a selection es- 
pecially for Band Day. His composition, 
"Songs for the Young," will be one of the 
featured selections played by the massed 
bands. 

A total of 1,257 students will cover the 
playing field for this annual event. The com- 
bined bands will consist of 927 instrumen- 
talists with 122 color guards and 208 major- 
ettes supplying additional color and siplay 
of talent for the event. 

The music provided for the audience will 
bo played on 927 instruments having a total 
value of approximately $201,350.00. The stu- 
dents will arrive in 31 buses, seven cars, 
and six trucks. 

They will spent Saturday morning rehears- 
ing the formations and music for the perfor- 
mance that afternoon. 

An added attraction for this event will be 
the introduction of Bill Severance, a sopho- 
more from Ridgway, Pa., feature twirler. 



Bill will display his baton twirUng ability 
to sc\eral oi the compositions played by the 
massed bands, 

Dr Michalski. who has had extensive ex- 
perience in developing Band Day at Penn 
State University, is looking forward to the 
1988 Band Day and plans to continue this 
a.s a tradition at Clarion State College. 

Students Get Awards 
In Special Education 

Six seniors and three juniors have been 
awarded traineeships in special education by 
the United States Office of Education. These 
awards are presented to students who exhibit 
outstanding promise in their chosen field of 
Special Education. 

The awards consist of $800 plus fees for 
the seniors and $300 for the juniors in addi- 
tion to their fees. The objective of the awards 
is to insure that the students selected will 
continue their education and graduate from 
the Speical Education Curriculum. 

Those selected from Clarion State College 
include: Robert Gevaudan, Cynthia Hovis, 
Bonnie Niciiy, Karen King, and Linda Marko- 
vich. seniors; and Carol Snyder, Marg Mc- 
Henry, and Mary Lou Nowacki, juniors. 

Dr. Kenneth Vayda, director of Special Edu- 
cation, said an alternate would be announced 
during the coming week. 



The Greeks of Clarion's ciimpus cordially 
welcome all freshman, transfer students from 
Venango, and upporclassmen. In addition, the 
Greeks send enthusiastic greetings to every- 
one for a successful year. Individually, the 
following sororities and fraternities would like 
tj pass on news from their chapters on cam- 
pus: 

ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA— The Gamma Om- 
icron Chapter welcomes their new advisors, 
Mrs. Pearl Bonner and Mrs. Henrietta Kod- 
rich. Both advisors are elementary teachers 
in the Clarion Area Schools. 

The Alpha Sigs would also like to extend 
their congratulations to one of their sisters, 
Jackie Tyke, who has been selected as one 
erf CSC's new majorettes. Miss Tyke is a 
sophomore majoring in elementary education. 
ALPHA SIGMA TAU— The Taus would like 
to announce that five of their sisters— Liz 
Cameron, Man Etta Hill, Mary Lou Kam- 
bert, Pat Poliwczak, and Barb Samuels— are 
student teaching tliis semester. In addition, 
Chris Wissner is studying in France this year. 
DELTA ZETA-The Delts would like to 
congratulate one of their sisters, Sandy Bro- 
dy, who has been selected as a judge for 
the Miss Teen-Age America contest. Miss 
Brody will represent Clarion Area in her 
judging. Another sister, Leona Acquaviva, 
is recognized for the Wcstinghouso clock ra- 
dio she won at the Murphy's store drawing. 
Student teachers for this semester from 
Delta Zeta include: Chris Adams, Anita Bush, 
Lynn Campbell, Kathy Farrell, Mary Ann 
Klemenzak, Donm Scopel, Peggy Steightner, 
and Marsha Zagorac. Another sister, Connie 
Griggs, is leaving for France on September 
27 to study. 1 

SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA-The Alpha Pi 
Chapter extends congratulations to their new- 
ly elected officers: Ginger Apple, president, 
and Cathy Smith, treasurer. 

Pledge week is now underway for Tri Sig- 
ma pledges held ovei from the spring semes- 
ter. These pledges can be identified on cam- 
pus by the pledge boxes they are carrying. 
ZETA TAU ALPHA— New Zeta officers for 
this year include Cathy Conflenti, secretary, 
Patty Skurkay, membership chairman, and 
Debbie Burghardt, historian. 

The Zetas also proudly announce that Jan 
Hoffman has been chosen as CSC's new Gol- 
den Girl. 

PHI SIGMA KAPPA— New Kappa officers 
for the coming year are: Bill Kreuer, presi- 
dent; Bryce Heasley, vice president; Jim 
Pratt, treasurer; Mike Czionka, recording 
secretary; Jim Davison, corresponding secre- 
tary; and Bob Faust, sentinel, 

THETA XI— The Xis' new officers are: Tom 
Parsons, president; Jerry Zary, vice presi- 
dent; Barry Romesburg, treasurer; Dave Ste- 
v/art, secretary; Tom Griffin, house manager; 
Bob Dragovich, pledgemaster; and Frank 
Toskey, scholastic cha-rman. 

The Xi house was remodeled during the 
summer months, and the Xi's would like 
to thank Keystone Carpenters for their ef- 
forts. 



Pins, Rings and Bells 



PINS 

Judy Hoid. Zeta Tau Alpha, to Bill Falello. 
Alpha Gamma Phi. 

Ken Lobaugh, Tau Kappa Epsilon. to Diane 
Knapp, CSC. 

Doug Callen, Tau Kappa Epsilon, to Ginny 
Carlson, Alpha Sigma Tau, 

RINGS 

Roger Garris, Thcta Xi, to Jayne Anthony, 
Freeport. 

Bob Faust, Phi Sigma Kappa, to Nancy 
Gacbel. 

Bob Lucas, Phi Sigma Kappa, to Alice 
Capp, Alpha Sigma Tau. 

James Canelos, CSC, to Judy Manzo. 

Don Kress, Phi Sigma Epsilon, to Joanne 
Long, CSC. 

Alvan H. Sage, Washington and Jefferson, 
to Amy Lonsway, CSC. 

Terry Shaffer, Penn State, to Karen Fierst, 
CSC. 

BELLS 

Ray Mohammadi, Theta Xi, to Janet KraJ- 
cic, Vandergrift. 

Jon Williams, Theta Xi, to Carol Purkins, 
Franklinville, New York. 

Kenny Sehman, Tlicta Xi, to Sheila Scott, 
CSC. 

Bruce Peters, Phi Sigma Kappa, to Karen 
Aeroline, CSC. 

Gary Hutton. Phi Sigma Kappa, to Amy 
McWhirter, Alpha Sigma Tau. 

Sam Lucci, Phi Sigma Kappa, to Marlene 
Hecht. 

Lynn Barton, Phi Sigma Kappa, to Dorothy 
Jean Street, CSC '68. 

Dave SchoUaert, Phi Sigma Kappa, to 
Cathy DeMine. 

Bob Drescher, Phi Sigma Kappa, to Judy 
AUman, Sigma Sigma Sigma, Grove City. 

Jim Alcorn to Jackie Faust, Zeta Tau Al- 
pha. 

Gene Smith, Theta Chi, to Linda Smith, 
Zeta Tau Alpha. 

Barry Sesack, Alpha Gamma Phi, to Mar- 
sha Bindas, Zeta Tau Alpha. 

Harry Notto, Alpha Gamma Phi, to Diane 
Morran, Zeta Tau Alpha. 

Jim Dobrancin, Sigma Tau Gamma, to 
Karen Skirpan, Zeta Tau Alpha. 

Jim Wildman, Alpha Gamma Phi, to Mary 
DeAngelis, Zeta Tau Alpha. 

Terry Hopkins to Charlotte Butcher, Zeta 1 
Tau Alpha. •I 

Russell Perry, Alpha Gamma ^i, to Teeiiia 
Kovatch. 

Ed Douglas, Theta Chi, to Merlene Wetcnt.j 
CSC. 

Robert Klauss, Tau Kappa Epsilon, to Sue 
Scullion, Pittsburgh. 



JAYNE KRIBBS VISITS CAMPUS 

Jayne Kribbs, '68, last year's editor of the 
Call, visited the campus September 13 to 
see old friends in the band and to attend 
the Clarion-Mansfield football game. Miss 
Kribbs is a graduate student at Pennsylvania 
Slate University in the Department of Eng- 
lish. 



The first United States president to seek 
a third term was U.S. Grant, who cam- 
paigned for the nomination in 1880. 



UNDERCLASSMEN AGREE 

Upperclassmen seem to agree wholeheart- 
edly on one phase of frosh week—kangaroo 
court misses Danny Stellute. 



Following Fine Performance 




RHEA'S MANOR 

SHIPPENVILLE 

Friday Night Fish Special 

DINE AND DANCE SATURDAY NIGHT TO 
THE MUSIC OF STAN MICHALSKI 



CORTEZ PURYEAR, drum major, and Jan Hoffman, Golden Girl smile 
after a fine halftime performance by the CSC band at the Mansfield game. 





MODERN DINER 

Where Friends Meet to Eat 

Enjoy Life , . . Eat Out Here Often 
We Are Always Open 



Wt' CahT lo ill** Family 



Children Are Always Welcome 




TAKING PART in the cornerstone ceremony for the 
Fine Arts Center were Leslie Hudak, Dr. Gemmell, Ro- 



bert Linker, Dr. Robert Van Meter, Dr. Elbert Moses, 
E. Clinton Stitt, Thomas Paolino, Joseph Spence. 



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"Hang "em High" opened Wednesday, Sep- 
tember 25, and will run through Saturday, 
September 28, at the Orpheum Theater in 
Clarion. Also at the Orpheum will be "Time 
to Sing," running from September 29 to Octo- 
ber 2, and "Stronger Returns" will open on 
October 3. 

At the Garby Theater in Clarion, Sidney 
' Peltier will be featured in the film, "For 
Love of Ivy," starting September 25, and 
running through October 1. "The Detective," 
starring Frank Sinatra, will open October 
2, and will close October 5. 

Both theaters will run iwo nightly shows 
starting at 7 and 9 p.m. In addition, a bar- 
gam night is now being taken into consider- 
ation for CSC students, according to Mr. Lar- 
ry Murphy, new manager of both theaters. 
Mr. Murphv would also like to stress that 
no more passes to the Orpheum or Garby 
for the 1958-69 school term will be accepted 
if signed by WiUiam Cozar. 



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Twenty-six major operations take place every minute in. the United States. When 

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provides almost half the whole blood and blood components 

used in civilian hospitals throughout the nation. And a lar^e pcr- 

tion of the plasma fractions. Last ysar we collected 2,979,100 

units of blood. This year we need evfin more. Please help us 

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Page 6 



THE CALL— Clarion State College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 




BOB OBERDOKF sheds a would-be Mansfield tackier alter receiving an 
Erdeljac pass. 



CSC Stamps Mounties 
In Season Opener 



The Eagles opcneii their 1968 football sche- 
dule with a win on September 14 by defeat- 
ing the Mansfield BJIounties by a score of 
21 to 13. 

The Mounties took the lead early in the 
first quarter when Stew Ca,sterline threw a 
16-yard touchdown pass to Jim Richardson. 
Tom Elsworth kicked the extra point. This 
was the only time Clarion was behind as 
they scored twice before the end of the first 
period on runs of tliree yards each by Bill 
Wise. 

Clarion's third touchdown came late in the 
third quarter when Bob Erdeljac hit Jim 
Becker for a 31-yard scoring pass. This put 
tlie game out of reach for Mansfield as they 
Could manage only one other score. Late 
in the final period Stan Skowron intercepted 
a pass from Erdeljac and ran it back 33 
yards for the touchdown. 

John Dorish kicked the three extra points 
for Clarion but failed on a 22-yard field goal 



attempt in the second quarter. The Player 
of the Week Award went to Bill Wise, who 
highlighted the Clarion running attack by 
gaining 94 yards in 13 carries. The top pass 
receivers for Clarion were Jim Becker and 
Bob Oberdorf, who received five passes each 
— Becker for 118 yards and a touchdown, and 
Oberdorf for 49 yards. 

GAME STATISTICS 

CSC Mansfield 

18 Total First Downs 12 

8 Fir.st Downs Rushing 5 

9 First Downs Passing 5 
1 First Downs by Way of Penalties 2 
200 Net Yards Rushing 65 
237 Net Yards Passing 176 
15-23 Passes Attempted and Completed 17-33 
437 Total Offense 241 
3/33.6 No. of Punts (Punting Avg.) 7/35 
8.5 Returned Yardage 42 
21 Score 13 




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CLOSE SAT. AT 6 P.M. 



Saturday, September 28, 1988 



Eagles 



TIppin Gym Dedication 



Downed Is Set for October 12 
At Dover 



Wise Named Eagle 
Player of Week 



Clarion suffered its first toss of the season 
on September 21, at the hands of Delaware 
State College at Dover, by a score of 34-22. 

Delaware opened the scoring when Saun- 
ders capped an 89-yard drive with a one- 
yard plunge into the end aone. Clarion tied 
the game with a touchdown of its own, with 
Bob Erdeljac scored on a one-yard run. 

Late in the .second quarter. Art Trivari 
blocked a Delaware punt that helped to set 
up a Clarion field goal attempt by John Dor- 
ish. His attempt fell short and Delaware's 
Gaines returned the ball 80 yards for a touch- 
down. 

Clarion gave up another touchdown early 
In the third period when Watson scored on 
an 83-yard run. The Eagles stayed in the 
game, however, as Bob Erdeljac scored again 
on a five-yard run. In the same quarter, 
Delaware scored on a 57-yard pass play to 
Gaines, which put the game out jf the reach 
of the Eagles. 

Clarion kept" alive with a fourth quarter 
scoring pass from Erdeljac to Bob Oberdorf 
that covered 18 yards. In hopes of a last 
minute victory. Coach Jacks called for a 
two point conversion, successfully carried out 
by Regis Ruanc. John Dorish went two for 
two in extra point conversions for Clarion, 
v/hile Delaware's Boney made good in four 
out of five attempts. Delaware ended the 
game by scoring with a 51 -yard run by Saun- 
ders. 



Students and faculty are invited to be pre- 
sent at 9:30 a.m. on Saturday, October 12, 
196ft— "Homecoming Day," when a represen- 
tative of the General State Authority will 
present the Waldo S. Tippin Gymnasium- 
Natatorium to Clarion State College. Mr. H. 
Ray Pope, Jr., president of the board of 
trustees, will accept the building on behalf 
of the college. Mr. Waldo S. Tippin and Pre- 
sident James Gemmell will be on hand to 
speak. The invocation will be delivered by 
the Reyerend Dr. Eidon Somers of the Cam- 
pus Ministry. 

The Clarion State College Band under the 
direction of Dr. Stanley F. Michalski will 
also be featured. Invitations havo been sent 
to various elected and appointed state, county 
and local officials. The Superintendent of 
Public Instruction, a number of congressmen, 
and several state representatives will be pre- 
sent as well as former and present members 
of the Clarion State College faculty and Board 
of Trustees and various friends of Mr. Tippin. 

The Health and Piiysical Education Depart- 
ment plans to conduct tours for visitors prior 
to and following the dedication ceremonies 
which are to be held in the main gym. The 
tours will include tlio rifle range, squash 
and handball courts, the main gym, and the 





GAME STATISTICS 




CSC 




Delaware 


16 


Total First Downs 


13 


2 


First Downs Ru»hing 


9 


10 


First Downs Passing 


4 


4 


First Downs Penalties 





49 


Net Yards Rushing 


286 


214 


Net Yards Passing 


122 



Beck Attends Meeting 

Dr. Paul E. Beck, associate professor of 
chemistry, attended the 156th National Meet- 
ing of the American Chemical Society in 
Atlantic City, New Jersey, September 8-11. 
Dr. Beck ,also participated in the Regional 
Conference for Chemistry Faculties in State 
Colleges sponsored by the Advisory Council 
on College Chemistry at Shippensburg State 
College, Shippensburg, September 13 and 14. 



20-41 Passes Attempted & Completed 7-13 

261 Total Offense 408 

5/41.2 No. of Punts (Punting Avg.) 5/29.2 

3 Returned Yardage 37 

22 Score 34 

Pendulum Will 
Swing Again 

With the opening of Peirce Science Center 
in January 1968, the students and the faculty 
of Clarion State College were impressed by 
its modern design and its modem facilities, 
particularly the Foucault Pendulum. 

The pendulum worked for a while, but 
after a time it started to fluctuate wildly. 
The fluctuations appear to have been caused 
by the booster power supply in the ceiling. 
This booster power supply is supposed to 
keep the pendulum swinging at an even 
speed. If the pendulum does not receive the 
correct boost, it begins to oscillate wildly. 

It has been observed that from 1:30 to 
3 p.m., the volume of power fluctuates. In- 
stead of a steady 117 volts, the volume of 
power fluctuates 20 percent or more. West 
Penn Power has been called in to investigate 
the problem. According to West Penn, the 
power coming into campus does not fluctuate 
nor does it fluctuate in the building. The 
IBM department has had no problems, but 
this could be due to the fact that they are 
operating on an output different from the 
pendulum. West Penn Power thinks that the 
output for the pendulum is improperly con- 
nected or that it may be grounded. 

The Phy,sical Science Department hopes the 
Foucault Pendulum will be in operating con- 
dition in the near future. 




COACH AL JACKS 



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two auxiliary gyms which have a total seat- 
ing capacity of 3,600. The tour will al.so in- 
clude the wrestling room and the swimming- 
diving pool which has seating accommoda- 
tions for 600 spectators. Visitors will also 
have a chance to se? the remedial physical 
education room and the fencing and dance 
studio. 

All these facilities have been con.structed 
and equipped at a total cost of $2,255,000. Jo- 
seph F. Bontempo and Associates designed 
the gymnasium-natatorium. They were also 
the architects for the dining hall and new 
science center. 

Grosch Pottery 
To Be Shown 

Pottery made by William Grosch, assistant 
professor of art, will be on display at the 
Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C, 
this October for a Cooperative Crafts Exhibi- 
tion — one of the special events in the capital 
for Co-op Month 1968. 

Two pieces of stoneware pottery by Mr. 
Grosch were selected by the Smithsonian In- 
stitute, Washington, D.C. for the Cooperative 
Crafts Exhibit. 

Mr. Grosch has b?en teaching and working 
with ceramics for seven years ra Clarion. 
He produces and displays functicr.al and de- 
corative stoneware pottery in his home stu- 
dio. He has displayed his work in many 
Pennsylvania craft shows, has talked and 
demonstrated to many local groups in the 
Northwest Pennsylvania area. 

Grosch is a graduate of Edinboro State Col- 
lege, Penn State University and has done 
additional graduate work in ceramics at Hay- 
stack Mountain School of Crafts, Maine, and 
Alfred University, Alfred, New York. He is 
a native of Warron, Pa. 

ProudM is Appointed 
Information Specialist 

William A. Proudfit has been appointed 
information specialist at Clarion State Col- 
lege, according to an announcement by Dr. 
James A. Gemmell, college president. 

In his new capacity, the Greenville resident 
will serve as sports information director, and 
will also have responsibility for alumni ser- 
vices, the college print shop and photographic 
services. He assumed his new duties Septem- 
ber 3. 

A native of Burgcttstown, Proudfit was 
formerly director of publicity at Tliiel College 




BILL WISE 

Bill Wise, senior fullback from Etna, wa« 
named player of tlie week at the first fall 
meeting of the Clarion 'State College Quarter- 
back Club September 17 at the college's 
Chandler Hall. 

The organization of local citizen boosters 
meets weekly during the football season, sel- 
ecting the outstanding player of the previous 
Saturday's contest and reviev/ing films of 
the game. 

Wise, who scored two touchdowns to spark 
the Golden Eagles in a 21-13 win over Mans* 
field State in the season opener, was intro- 
duced with co-captains Bob Gevaudan, North 
Braddock, and Jim Jones, Latrobe. 

H. H. Arnold, Jr., president of the 150 
member club, introduced college president. 
Dr. James A. Gemmell, who welcomed the 
boosters. 

"Athletics is not the most important thing 
at Clarion, but it is a very important acti- 
vity," he said. 

"We believe our athletes are second to 
none and that Clarion is a good place for 
athletes to develop and coaches to work." 

Athletic Director Frank Lignelli thanked 
the club for its excellent support of the team 
and introduced members of the coaching staff 
in attendance. 

In reviewing the films, Coach Al Jacks 
commended the team for playing a "tough 
defensive game," but noted that there were 
some corrections to be made offensively de- 
spite the Eagles' 18-12 edge in first downs 
and average of five yards per carry on the 
ground. 



and has had extensive management exper- 
ience with the McKcesport and Wilkinsburg 
clubs of the Amcricau Automobile Associa- 
tion. 

His wife, the former Dorothy Gregory, is 
a kindergarten teacher for the Greenvi'lc 
School District. The couple has two sons. 




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Waldo Tippin Will Be 
Honored at Dedieation 
Ceremony for Gym 



Vol. 40, No. 2 



CLARION STATE COLLEGE — CLARION, PENNSYLVANIA 



Friday, October 4, 1968 



Cast Scores in 'After 




MEMBERS OF ARTHUR MILLER'S 'After the Fall' cast include Dan Wei- 
land Veronica Smith, Phil Ross, Bobby Egidi, Betty Corbett, Steve Brezzo, 
Pat Losick, John Solomon, Connie Carter, Herb Michaels, Dave Klmdienst, 



Joel Kauffman, Judy Cross, Linn McGahan, Pam McFeaters, Connie Alexis, 
and Joanne Long. The new play was well received by appreciative Clarion 
audiences. 



Play Review . 



By GEORGE HALL 

Seeing After the Fall Wednesday night was 
a worthwhile and rewarding experience, one 
that this reviewer will not soon forget. The 
Arthur Miller play— directed by Bob H. Cope- 
land and with sets designed by Adam F. 
Weiss— was the first production of the aca- 
demic year by the Clarion State Department 
of Speech and Dramatic Arts. 

The play takes place in the mind of Quen- 
tin, played by John Solomon, a lawyer who, 
for the most part, has not had too much 
happiness in his life. As a child, he was 
subject to the constant conflict between his 
parents, played by Veronica Smith and Theo- 
phil Ross, and as a lawyer because of his 
association with the Communist Party and 
the events which occur as a result of this 
affiliation. 

This background is coupled with a friend 
who commits suicide and with four women— 
hij, first wife, Louise (Judy Cross), who feels, 
and is, constantly neglected by Quentin; a 
mother < Miss Smith) whom he loved dearly 
but who deceived him as a child; a switch- 
board operator turned singer named Maggie 
(Connie Carter) whom he later marries; a 
German tourist guide, Holga (Pam McFea- 
ters), who is repeatedly referred to as the 
"good thing" in his life. With this plot, it 
ic understandable that Miller's play has been 
labeled by various New York critics "a very 
difficult play to make happen." 

Keeping in mind the extremely difficult 
material, Mr. Solomcn did a fantastic job 
of relating the experience to the audience 
while still maintaining the action between 
himself and the other characters, which is 
necessary in telling this particular story. His 
ability to "keep to the theme ' of something 
created, something destroyed was very im- 
pressive. 

Miss Carter and Miss Cross both did ex- 
cellent jobs of capturing the audience within 
their characters. Miss Carter, as Maggie, 



first made us laugh at the innocence and 
unawareness of a young, naive woman alone 
in the world, then extracted pity from the 
audience as she portrayed a crushed and 
broken woman grabbing at straws of past 
glory and trying desperately to salvage her 
marriage to Quentin. Miss Cross, Louise, the 
constant thorn in Quentin's side, was the 
wife wrapped up in principle, plagued with 
suspicion of Quentin and his alleged affairs 
with other women. 

Miss Smith and Mr. Ross, Quentin's par- 
ents, represent the springboard in Quentin's 
life, the root of all his inner conflict, and 
they appear throughout the play as an ever- 
present reminder to him of their influence 
on his life. 

Mr. Copeland and Dr. Weiss, congratula- 
tions! To the cast and production staff, bra- 
vo! A job well done! 

MEMBERS OF THE CAST 

Quentin John Solomon 

Felice Linn McGahan 

Holga Pam McFeaters 

Mother Veronica Smith 

Dan David Weiland 

Father Theophil Ross 

Nurses Bobby Egidi, Betty Corbett 

Doctor Dave Klindienst 

Maggie Connie Carter 

Elsie Pat Losick 

Lou Herb Michaels 

Mickey Steve Brezzo 

Louise Judy Cross 

Reverend Barnes Joel Kauffman 

Chairman Ken Miller 

Secretary Connie Alexis 

Carrie Joanne Long 

Lticas Mike Elliott 

Clergyman Joel Kauffman 

Woman with Parrot Nancy Plese 

Man Willie Sanders 

College Boy Bob Heimann 



Convention Discussion 
Features Gov. Wallace 



Division of Communication 
Plans Move to Davis Hall 



The remodeled Davis Hall will serve three 
main functions of the Division of Communi- 
cation. These are: (1) to provide more class- 
rooms and specialized laboratories for aca- 
demic offerings. (2) to provide production 
facilities for photographic (motion picture 
and still) and graphic work, television, re- 
cording, and eventually FM radio. (3) to 
provide facilities for supporting other acade- 
mic divisions in in-,tructional development. 

To serve these purposes, there will be both 
instructional and experimental classrooms. 
The faculty will have the use of a professional 
graphic arts area, as well as photographic 
studios and darkrooms. Studio A, the exist- 
ing studio, will be used for television, while 
Studio B, the one now underway, will be 
a radio-recording studio, and auxiliary tele- 
vision studio. 

Another area will contain a non-book in- 
structional materials center, with individual 
carrels for use by students and faculty. It 
will be available for previewing motion pic- 
tures, slides, film strips, and other visual 
materials, and for listening to audio tapes 
and records. This area will also contain units 
for programmed instruction, including pro- 
grams for remedial and review purposes. 

A third area will contain individual carrels 



which will utilize programming technic|ues 
for self-instruction in audio-visual equipment. 

Plans are being made to use one room 
as a performance analysis studio, so that 
student teachers, musicians, and other people 
in the performing arts can videotape a pre- 
sentation and have immediate playback. 

There will be a collection of audio-visual 
equipment, used to provide service to the 
general college faculty. 

Space has been allocated for use by the 
Clarion Area Regional Instructional Materials 
Center, which serves the public schools of 
five counties. They will bring to the campus 
a library of approximately 5,000 motion pic- 
tures and various ether media production 
facilities. 

A new proposal will be submitted to have 
a graduate program in media initiated by 
September 1969. 

"The completion of Davis Hall will give 
Clarion State College one of the finest media 
facilities in the country," says Dr. Cole, 
Dean. Division of Communication. "The fac- 
ilities will not only make possible additional 
academic offerings by the division, but in- 
creased service to the college's instructional 
program, research projects, workshops, and 
institutes." 



By ED WOZNIAK 

The panel discussion of Wednesday evening, 
September 25, supposedly on the 1968 political 
conventions, was gradually sidetracked into 
a discussion of former Alabama governor, 
George C. Wallace. Although the other can- 
didates were briefly mentioned, the preoc- 
cupation with Mr. Wallace was obvious. This 
however is not a point of criticism, since 
the preoccupation with Mr. Wallace is simply 
a reflection of the national prominence that 
the American Independent Party nominee has 
attained. 

The panel, modented by Dr. Joel Haines, 
consisted of Mr. Jay VanBniggen, Mr. Ngo 
Dinh Tu, Dr. Samuel Wilhelm, Mr. Serjit 
Singh, and Mr. Emmctt Graybill, Jr., Clarion 
faculty members. 

Dr. Haines began the discussion by pointing 
out that in the 1968 presidential race, there 
are three strong candidates vying for the 
office instead of the usual two. This statement 
proved to be a foreshadowing of events 
to come. Dr. Wilhelm gave a brief back- 
ground of historical precedents to the three- 
way presidential race, pointing to the elec- 
tions of 1860, 1912, und 1924. This was the 
point of departure. 

Mr. VanBruggen then gave his views on 
the difference between the Bull Moose Party 
of Theodore Roosevelt and the American In- 
dependent Party of Mr. Wallace. He observed 
that the Bull Moose faction was a split from 
the Republican party but that the American 
Independent Party is an outside movement 
drawing from both major parties. 

The discussion then turned to foreign opin- 
ion of the candidates. Mr. Tu said that, in 
Fiance, Mr. Wallace is considered the one 
candidate that is candid. He also said that 
the people of Vietnam feared Kennedy and 
McCarthy and that they favored either Nixon 
or Humphrey. 

The question was raised in the audience 
whether George Wallace was nn election 
spoiler or if he really believed that he could 
really win in November. Mr. VanBruggen 
called Wallace a "dreamer" and said that 
he would get no more than 70 electoral votes. 
Mr. Wallace's geographical areas of strength 
were pointed out by Mr. Graybill. He said 
that the industrial centers, especially the au- 
tomobile and steel areas, were Wallace 
strongholds, as well as many states in the 
deep South. Dr. Wilhelm admitted that the 
Wallace threat is serious, but that he is not 
strong enough to win. Mr. Graybill said that 
Wallace's appeal is to people tired of old 
promises of betterment, while the nation 
sinks lower and lower in problems. 

Although the discussion strayed from its 
original topic, it was very interesting and 
informative concerning the candidates them- 
selves, especially Mr. Wallace. Dr. Haines 
promised a similar discussion as the presi- 
dential race goes into its final stages. Would- 
n't it be interesting to have a Wallace sup- 
porter on the next panel? 



African Film 
To Be Shown 

The Hunters, a feature-length color docu- 
mentary of the bushmen in Africa, will be 
presented by the Clarion State College Arch- 
aeological Association on Monday, October 7, 
at 8:30 p.m. According to Dr. Konitsky, the 
movie, which will be shown in Room 161, 
Peirce Hall, is one of the best movies ever 
filmed about the bushmen. The public is in- 
vited. 

Dr. Konitsky and 14 members of the CSC 
Archaeological Association plan a dig to Tidi- 
oute on Saturday, October 5, to search for 
artifacts left by the Five Indian Nations. 

Professors Give 
Talk on Charles 11 

The father of a Clarion English professor 
spoke here Monday night when Dr. John 
Harold Wilson, professor emeritus of Enghsh 
at Ohio State University, gave a lecture on 
"The Not So Bloody Merry." Dr. Wilson is 
the father of Dr. Robin Wilson, professor of 
English on the Clarion faculty. 

Professor J. H. Wilson is considered an ex- 
pert in British history, and has written 
Iti books and over 50 articles on the subject. 
He was a Fellow of the Fulton Library, and 
of the Guggenheim Foundation. 

In his talk, Professor Wilson spoke of the 
reign of Charles II, and of his court. It 
was the story of tho end of Puritanism, and 
the revival of the double standard of moral- 
ity which prevails to the present day. He 
presented this period in history with humor 
and spice, introducing concepts through an- 
ecdotes. The lecture was both interesting and 
informative. 



Guys and Gals 
Plan Intramurals 



"The Great White Father," as Mr. Waldo 
S. Tippin was affectionately called by his 
students, will have yet another honor be- 
stowed upon him when the Waldo S. Tippin 
Gymnasium-Natatorium is dedicated on Oc- 
tober 12. 

A graduate of Clay Center, Kansas, 
High School, Mr. Tippin look his undergrad- 
uate degree at Geneva College and acquired 
a master's degree at Columbia University 
Before coming to Cicrion, Mr. Tippin was 
a coach at Meadville High School, where his 
teams won four Western Pennsylvania foot- 
ball championships and three district PIAA 
basketball champicnships. He also coached 
at Allegheny College. 

In 1935 Tippin came to Clarion as athletics 
director. In this capacity he coached basket- 
ball and football which were the main var- 
sity sports offered at that time. Later golf, 
ba.seball, wrestling, rifle, and tennis were 
at'ded and the college intramural program 
was developed. Un-Jor his direction, the grid 
team of 1952 captured a victory at the Lions' 
Bowl in North Carolina, thus triumphantly 
closing an undefea;ed sea.son. 

Many of Mr. Tippin's students and team 
members have gone on to become famous. 
Alex Sandusky, who retired a few years ago 
from a successful 12 years as a lineman 
with the Baltimore Colts, was a member 
of one of Tippin's college football teams; 
G(vernor Raymond Shafer served in the 
"Tippin team" as a Meadville High School 
gridster. Joe O'Brien and Bill Sheridan, both 
of Clarion, who played football with the Am- 
erican League New York Yankees, also play- 
ed under Mr. Tippin. 

In 1966, after 31 years of service, Waldo 
Tippin retired from his coaching career. A 
one-time sports official, he was president of 
the Tri State Official's Association and is 
a past president of the Pennsylvania State 
Colleges' Athletic Conference. After holding 
many district and national offices in the Na- 
tional Association of Intercollegiate Athletics, 
national honors were accorded him in 1962 
for meritorious servic^j to the NAIA. 

Clarion also has paid tribute to Mr. Tippin 
in various ways. Alfred Charlie executed a 
bronze bust of Mr. Tippin which was to adorn 
the cafeteria. 

In 1956 the CSC band centered the entire 
half-time show around his life. At that time 
he was presented with a large plaque designa- 
ting him as an honorary member of the 
band; this was the first time in the history 
of the band that honorary membership was 
bestowed on anyone. Dr. Michalski decided 
to award him because Mr. Tippin always 
had the band in mind and showed them un- 
usually close cooperation, and also because 
ho was a "gentleman, a scholar and a great 

guy. . ." 

In an interview v/ith Mr. Ronald Shumaker 
and Mr. Bruce Macbeth of the English De- 
partment, who were students of Mr. Tippin, 
it was established that Mr. Tippin was re- 
spected by all on campus, was extremely 
godd-looking and in excellent physical con- 
dition. He was quiet, soft-spoken and never 
raised his voice. 

Mr. Ernest Johnson, who played under Mr. 
Tippin and assisted him as head football 
coach during the last .year Tippin was here, 
described him as "affable, most cooperative, 
and a really true gentlemen of sports. He 
has always been a tribute to Clarion. It is 
only proper and fitting that the gym bear 
his name." 

Calendar of 
Coming Events 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5 

-—Football: Clarion vs. Lock Haven, away. 
—Play: "After the Fall," Chapel, 8:30 p.m. 
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6 

—Movie: "Jules and Jim," Chapel, 8 p.m. 
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8 
— Frosh Football: Clarion vs. Slippery 

Rock, away 
—Cross Country: Clarion, Slippery Rock vs. 

"hiiel, at Thiel 
—Quarterback Club Dinner, Chandler, at 

6:30 p.m. 




WALDO S. TIPPIN 



Opinion Poll 

For some time it has been said t!iat I he 
students of Clarion Slate Conine are apathe- 
tic. To find out wh'i-her this is true, a poll 
was taken. 

The question posed to all the students in- 
volved in the survey was: "What is your 
reactirn to the letter from the Student Ac- 
tivities Committee concerning the changes 
made in the social calendar? 

The general reaction was one of displea- 
sure, not apathy. Students previously blaming 
the social committee for a poor program of 
events were made aware of the real reasons 
for the lack of social activity. 

Martha Zvonik commented: "1 had realized 
that there were weekends without anything 
scheduled, but couldn't understand why." She 
also said: "If the activities are for the stu- 
dents, why shouldn't the students (in the 
form of the social committee) schedule our 
activities? No one else has the right to change 
our calendar." 

Jim Ryland echoed Miss Zvonik's feelings: ■ 
"We should expect the schedule to be adhered 
to. Why should anyone have the right to 
interfere with the .social schedule of the stu- 
dent body, especially after it's been approved 
by them (the deans)?" 

The schedule was originally planned to ac- 
commodate home and away football games. 
As the schedule was printed, however, some 
weekends of away games are void of any 
real social activity. 

John Hafera said. "There should be some- 
thing planned both Friday and Saturday 
nights— especially on weekends of away 
games. We cant be expected to travel to 
all the away games, and likewise, we should- 
n't have to sit around all weekend with no- 
thing to do." 

Bill Zener's very terse comment amplifies 
Huffs opinion: "You might as well pack 
your bags, because there ain't nothing to 
do." 

Some students feel it is still the Student 
Senate's fault for lotting the schedule be 
changed. John Dorish said: "This sort of 
thing has been happening all the time. The 
Student Social Committee is by far the 
greatest farce, because everything is still 
controlled by the administration. Perhaps 
someone should redefine the term, advisor." 
John Solomon asks this question: "It has 
been my understanding that the student gov- 
ernment, and only the student government, 
should govern the student body. Is this an- 
other power-hungry dean's way of asserting 
himself, or has the Student Senate openly 
admitted that they are not governing, but 
arc being governed?" 

Committees Planned 
By Student Senate 

Tom Paolino, president of Student Senate, 
has announced that six faculty-student com- 
mittees will be sot up. Each of these six 
committees will need four interested and con- 
cerned students. Those committees are food 
and dining, housing, cultural affairs, orienta- 
tion affairs, social affairs, and student publi- 
cations. 

Any students interc^d in serving on these 
committees are asked to sign up in Dr. El- 
liott's office by 5 p.m. Wednesday, October 9. 



Readers Seek 
Original Works 

Clarion College Readers is searching for 
original scripts, poetry, and prose suitable 
for stage productions. 

Students and faculty may submit material 
to Dr. Mary Hardwick in Room 168, Peirce 
Hall; final date for submis.sion is November 
18. 1968. A monetary reward will be offered 
for those scripts approved for production by 
the Showcase Review Board. 



The first meeting of the Intramural Mana- 
gers' Board was held September 27, 1968. 
Officers elected were: president, Kelly Bruc- 
kart; vice president, Paul Carroll; secretary- 
treasurer, Ray Hough; public relations offi- 
cer. Bob Dragovich. The purpose of this or- 
ganization is to promote student health and 
physical efficiency, to foster a spirit of enthu- 
siasm, good sportsmanship, and healthful ri- 
valry through the medium of competitive ath- 
letics. The board consists of one representa- 
tive from each frptornity, dormitory, and 
iiidependent team. Tie meeting was conduct- 
ed by Mr. Charles Nanz, Director of Intra- 
murals, who familianzed the board with the 
Constitution and Bylavs of Intramural Ath- 
letics. It should be noted that the constitution 
does not permit fraternities to use non-mem- 
bers or social members; and that those living 
in a dormitory can only participate in in- 
tramurals as a member of that dormitory's 
team. There will also be independent teams, 
consisting of those not belonging to a frater- 
nity IMJT living in a dormitory. 



Events Planned for 
CSC Homecoming 



The theme for the .mnual Homecoming- 
Autumn Leaf Festival parade, which will be 
held Saturday morning, October 12, is "Am- 
erica the Beautiful." 

Entering the parade will be 19 Clarion State 
College units including 18 floats from fraterni- 
ties, sororities, and other campus organiza- 
tions. The CSC marching band will also par- 
ticipate. Civic groups, such as the Clarion 
Chamber of Commerce, and business organi- 
zations, such as Owen-Illinois Glass Com- 
prny, will also eni,er floats. 

Distinguished visiiors riding in the parade 
will be Congressman John Saylor, 23rd dis- 
trict; State Senator Albert Pechan; Garion's 



state representative, George W. Alexander; 
Auditor-General Grace Slcan: county com- 
missioners Brady Weaver. Frank Stahlman, 
and Cuvier Kline; aad Clarion's Mayor Char- 
les Patterson. 

Judges for the float competition are G. 
Fe-ster Edwards, Riverside Division of Penn 
Traffic; Robert Davis, West Penn Power, 
Kittanning; and Andrew Shefflcr, Travel De- 
velopment Bureau, Harrisburg 

Later in the evening, a dance will be held 
in Chandler Hall from 9 p.m. until 1 a.m. 
Music will be provided by the Manhattans 
and the Contrails. Dress will be semi-formal. 



Page 2 



THE CALL — Clarion State College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



Friday, October 4, 1968 



THE CALL — Clarion State CoUege, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



editorially 
Speaking 



What Do Class Officers Do? 



I-ast week's election on this cam- 
pus involved the ejection of class of- 
ficers. Those chosen for president, 
vice-president, secretary, and treasurer 
of each class are supposedly elected to 
lead their fellow students and to in- 
troduce and carry through specific ac- 
tivities for the benefit of their class 
peers. However, the actual duties of 
Clarion's class officers are obscure. 

Just what do the class officers on 
this campus do? 

The students are rarely informed 
of wiiat is going oiT within; their class- 
^. Meetings are seldom held. For ex- 
alnple, two class meetings were ^-hedul- 
ekl for the sophomore class last year. 
The first was an introductpry meeting 
>Yhich concluded with no pertinent re- 
sUlts. and the seconfl involved the se- 
lection of a representative from the 
dass for the Miss CSC pageant. 

t The other classes had a similar 
number of meetings, and the end re- 
sults were equally lacking in signifi- 



cance. Surely more happens within 
each class that would necessitate the 
gathering of all members. In addition, 
no statements are issued to the stu- 
dents regarding their obligations as 
class members, nor are students asked 
to initiate ideas that could result in 
more activities or more class unity. If 
no stimulus is given by the officers, 
the members have no grounds for 
meaningful response. Hence it ap- 
pears that Clarion has officers in name 
only. 

We hope that the new class of- 
' ficers will put forth their efforts to 
change the current attitude that stu- 
dents now have about class officers. 
A new concern by the officers could 
motivate the interest of the student 
body which, in turn, could produce the 
enthusiastic support of class members. 
Now is the time to act; now is the time 
to make our classes function through 
the leadership of the new class offic- 
ers. 

— C. W. 



JEntertainment: Limited 



I For Homecoming this year we are 
having the Manhattans and the Con- 
trails. Both of these groups are well i 
known, but their popularity in recent 
yiears has declined. The Manhattans, 
36 it will be remembered, were here . 
last year for Homecoming. The Con- 
trails are also returning to Clarion. 
Tjheir last appearance in Clarion was 
two years •ag^ «•». \:; .:* •- » . 

Two weeks ago it Was decided to 
begin looking for groups. Dr. Nanov- 
sky and the Social Committee wanted 
to bring the Temptations or another 
nationally known group to Clarion, but 
two weeks is not enough time to con- ; 
tnc t and book these groups Thji* wd* ' 
had to seUle for something; less'.than 
desired. 



Homecoming is a big^vent to the 
students of Clarion, but will it contin- 
ue to be one if we must setlla-lor \ess 
than the desired? The dat^; lor Home-,' 
coming is set far enough fn'&dvance to 
allow time to contract groups StfcH as 
the Temptations or Peter, f^h an(| 
Mary. Last y^ar tHe administration in-' 
formed the social col^mittee that they 
could not book more than a year m ad- 
vance. Couldn't they have booked 
someone six months ago? Or is that 
too far in advance? 



This year the Conversations are 
scheduled to appear at our Christmas 
dance. Here again, we are settling for 
less than the best. We are not ques- 
tioning their quality, but we are ques- 
tioning their popularity. Why could- 
n't we have a nationally known group 
for the Christmas dance? If it is pos- 
sible to tentatively plan on having a 
^roup this much in advance, couldn't 
the social committee look into having 
a nationally known group instead? 

Last year when we voted for the 
student senators, we also voted on 
whether we, the students of Clarion, 
were willing to pay to see big name 
groups. The student body approved 
this measure. Money, then, may not 
be a factor in the contracting of a 
group. 

Other colleges the size of Clarion 
are able to book currently well-known 
groups. Why can't Clarion? The Con- 
trails haven't been heard of since they 
cut "Someone." But having a record 
out two years ago is reason enough to 
bring them to Clarion. Since we seem 
to be booking big name groups this 
year, has anyone looked into having 
the Andrews Sisters here for Greek 
Weekend? 

— S. M. D. 



Support Your 'CALL 



The Clarion Call 

CALL Office, Room J, Harvey Hall 
Clarion State College, Clarion, Penna. 

EDIT^-IN-CIIIEF Carolyn Welesko 

BUSINESS MANAGER Tom Smith 

NEWS EDITOR . Sandy Diesel 

COPY EDITOR Rosemary Slebodnik 

EXCHANGE EDITOR Peg Foley 

CIRCULATION MANAGER Lynn Hannold 

CO-SPORTS EDITORS Gene Ilerritt, Gary Andres 

Advisor: Richard K. Redfern 



PNPAl 



MFMiri 

PSirwsnvAinA 

VCWSPAPER 
POBUSHBRr 

Assocunof 




r P \ -S'tor Gazers Get Facilities; 
Open House Is Planned 



The Clarion State College Planetarium is 
now in operation. The planetarium officially 
oi ned on the first d.'iy of this semester. The 
new facilities are an addition to Clarion's 
current face-lifting. 

The planetarium, in function, will be a 
teaching device used by the science depart- 
ment to increase the student's scientifil liter- 
acy. At pre.scnt, only three courses are usin-; 
the planetarium: Teaching of Eledfentary 
Science, Descriptive Astronomy, and Basic 
PhyHCal Science II. 

Jack N. Blaine, director of the planetarium, 
indicates that the faciliUcs will be used for 
srecial programs designed for the student 
body and faculty. An cpen house is also 
being. planned for the $435,500 addition. 

The Clarion State College Planetarium fa- 
cility is centered arcund a Spitz Laboratory 
Model A3PR projection instrument. This in- 
strument, which costs $28,000, projects the 
stars, planets, mooa and sun onto the plane- 
tarium projection dome, which is 40 feet in 
diameter. It produces in the planetarium sky, 
celestial motions v.hich imitate the effect of 
the earth's rotation, revolution, and preces- 
tiicnal motion. 

The projector also provides for 360 degrees 
of latitude motion to enable the observer 
to view the sky as it would appear from 



any latitude. The aniiuci motions of the plan- 
ets and moon, and the apparent motion of 
the sun can also be shown. 

Projected lines provide a gjrid of geocentric 
coordinates, the eclipUc antf the meridian. 
A group of auxiliary projectors are used sim- 
ulate certain effects such as satellites, twi- 
light, and a geocentric view of the earth. Pro- 
jected spots of light locate such key sky 
positions as the ceiCEtial pole, zenith, home 
latitude and the cardinal points. 

One of the most outstanding features of 
the instrument is the azimuth control which 
permits the lecturer to place any portion 
of the sky directly in front of the audience 
fci easy viewing. 

The planetarium is also equipped with a 
complete stereo sound syistem including a 
tape deck and record player, and the opera- 
tion of the projection insti'ument and the 
.sound system is controlled from the console 
at the rear of tha ioom. 

The contour seating can accommodate up 
to 100 people. Each seat l.s equipped with 
a folding tablet a^m and can be inclined 
approximately 25 degrees. Also, the planetar- 
ium is completely air conditioned to assure 
audience comfort. 

The planetarium, now an actuality, is a 
welcome addition to iJie campus. 



Letters to The Editor: 



When you write a letter lo the ld(itor6^«C 
the Call, please sign your name or names. 

We are glad to print worthwhile letters 
about Hie at Clarion State CsH^ge,- but we ' 
believe in adhering to an old principle in 
newspaper work: anonyi»ous l«tlcur» arie 
usually ignored. The Call will print letters 
signed by psudonyms onlj) if tlie writ^'s 
true name is attached. —The Editors. 

—The Editors 



To the Editors of the Call: ' ' 

We are very much concerned about the 
shortened \'er'^inn of dir colnmn in A Peek at 
the Greeks in last week's Clarion CaU, Sep- 
tember 28, 19^. 

Since it was the first column (as well as 
the first paper) that appeared this year, 
ther" "as a great deal cf Mews thrl would 
have been of interest to returning students. 
However, for some reason, lyou cut our col- 
umn to one-fourth its original length and 
completely rewrote the few articles that ap- 
peared. We would like to know the reason 
why. 

Sororities and fraternities are a major part 
of the campus. It does not seem reasonable 
or fair to .suddenly reduce the Greeks' ar- 
ticles from one page to not even half! We 
admittedly are not sure if the other columns 
were shortened, but seeing that ours was, we 
assume the others were also. They are prob- 
ably wondering what the reason is, just as 
wc are. 

Peek at the Greeks has long been a part of 
the Clarion Call; a part, we might add, that 
is widely read. Many independents, as well 
as Greeks, read the Call for that specific 
column. It was fun and enjoyable, and a 
diversion from the facts, facts, facts that 
make up most of the rest of the paper. 

We feel you should justify your actions and 
we believe that you have practically elim- 
inated one of the best parts of the Clarion 
Call. 

SISTERS OF DELTA ZETA 

THE EDITORS REPLY 

In answer to your »etter of, concern over 
the changed version of the ' Greek' news col- 
umn, the editorial staff wduld first like to 
thank you for the interest you have taken by 
writing your letter, and we hope that we can 
explain to both you and all the Greek organi- 
zations exactly why the change has been 
made. ^ . • 

It is noi the intention of the statf that the 
"Peek at the Greeks" column h^.ejotlftned, 
but rather that moderate Jo'^rnalistrc -.stan- 
dards be maintained in this|unti(hriar article, 
and that copy be written ii^s%cb > way that 
all students on this camgji^yi^an identify 
names and understand statdtnents. 

For example, in the news Delta Zeta soror- 
ity submitted last week for publication, the i 
following statements were made;*" "V^et^ ' 
glad to see that Anna Marie has r^cAlperatMj 
after being in an accident this sj^mmet;' boc 
keeps them in shape; and m.4yb«r pebbie 
should take over the strippdr rdutfrte.* ^Thesq ■ 
facts are no doubt pertinent to j^dui- ' sirority^-. 
and to the few people on campUs who knovv' 
who "Anna Marie, Doc, and Debbie" are, but 
the large majority of students caiyiltit idenl|fs^ 
thpse students without last'iiame^ attacfod; , 

In addition and in reference to" our goal for 
higher journalistic standards, we are striving, 
for quality writing without slang or comments 
which are understood only by a handful of 
students. These are the reasons why the 
column was cut in the last issue, and why 
parts were rewritten 

If, as you say, the Call i^often read speci- 
fically for the Greek column, then why have 
a student newspaper? The purpose of any 
paper is to inform the public of what is hap- 
pening—here on campus or anywhere that 
news is made. As far as w*- IwtMv^ i'lbMa, 
ficts. facts" are the only efficient way to 
transfer news. However, lighter feature stor- 



ies are being planned for future issues to 
avoid the monotony you describe. 

Pfease keep in mind that we are NOT anti- 
Greek. We realize that the Greek organiza- 
tions on this campus are important and 
should be recognized in the college paper. If, 
for example, any fraternity or sorority would 
suhipit four or five pages of good solid Greek 
new* each week, we would be more than 
willing to print it provided that the standards 
we have outlined arc maintained. 

THE EDITORS 



library, the bookstore, or anywhere. But it 
i) not evident to a considerable number and 
as long as theft is tolerated by the many, 
the few will continue to steal. 

In the meanwhile the library will continue 
to do what it can to cut down the stealing 
although, as the author of a recent article 
in a library periodical noted, there is not 
much that can be done if a person is deter- 
mines! to steal books. 

ROGER G. HORN, 

Reference Libntrian and Bibliographer 



ling you, come to the Senate meetings and 
bring it up. 

Thank you, 

TOM PAOLINO, 

President of Student Senate 



Editor, The Call: 

The large number of books "missing" from 
the library remains a constant source of vex- 
ation to students, faculty and to the libra- 
rians. The ambiguity of the status of such 
books is much of the vexation; they may 
be in use, or out of place in the library 
or they may have been stolen. In many cases 
the books are still in the building, but can- 
not be found for various reasons. 

The most common of those reasons is 
misshelving; the books are used and then 
put back in the wrong place, usually by 
accident v/hen the user sees an empty spot 
an aisle or two away from v/hcre he thought 
he got the book. 

However, it is a common trick for a user 
to deliberately misshelvo the book or books 
so that others in (he class will not got it. 
That may be from the relatively innocent 
motive of wanting to put the book aside 
for use later, or it may be a vicious attempt 
to prevent the rest of the class from seein? 
assigned readings. We do not like to think 
that people do that sort of thing, but library 
experience confirms that thoy do, indeed. 

Books are stolen in two ways— temporarily 
and permanently. The temporary stealing 
seems to be a kind of informal loan plan; 
there are no due dates and no fines when- 
ever the book may be brought back. Howev- 
er, the advantages are restricted to the one 
v/ho has the book. No one else knows where it 
ii" or whether it will be back or not. 

Last year we began to unlock the doors 
leading out of the library on the second floor 
because it seemed convenient for everyone, 
especially library science students. However, 
our losses have been excessive and we are 
now locking those doors in an attempt to curb 
t}>e flow of books leaving illegally. It is not 
likely that that will do more than ameliorate 
the situation. Unless the students and faculty 
become convinced tliat it is wrong to steal 
library books, the books will continue to be 
stolen. 

Let us offer here some reasons why book 
stealing is wrong. First, the books belong 
to the State, -and taking them is .simply illeg- 
al. Second, it is meanly selksh. The vhole 
idea of having a library is that there shoald 
be a common pool of books for the use of ev- 
eryone in the college. That is, the books are 
there for everyone; when they are stolen 
it -ia a loss to everyone; to all potential 
users and to all who value their common 
boojfc collection. What belongs to everyone 
belongs to no one in particular and the taking 
tjiereof for particular use is debased selfish- 

The library does noi nave unlimited 
amounts of money and we will not replace 
stolen books for a long time— that is, until 
w€ are certain that they are really gone 
for good— if at all. This year both copies 
of the World Almanac, a very useful book 
for many students, have passed into the 
hands of two students;, faculty, or someone 
else. They have not been replaced. 

Volume 8 of the 1911 edition of the En- 
Gvctopedia Britannica (the famous 11th ed- 
ition) was stolen last year. Wc have no way 
of getting one volume of the 11th edition 
and cannot afford to buy another whole set 
ti> replace one volume. Any number of other 
CS9BB could be added here. To most people 
associated with the college it is self evident 
tim% one simply shaulU not stea^ frum tbe 



LIBRARY: TELL US OUR SECRET 

Bewildered students again begin their an- 
nual roamings about Carlson Memorial Lib- 
rary. Attacking the stacks, unarmed ;^and dl_ 
equipped to cope with the ae^arcntly unor-' 
ganized volumes, they grope in vam for tid- 
bits of information to fulfill the bare-mini- 
mum requirements for a research assign- 
ment. 

Is there actually any rhyme or reason to 
tilt placement of these thousands of books, 
periodicals and research volumes'? To what 
mystical system does the librarian attribute 
his ability to find the sought for volume 
when, as a last resort, one interrupts him to 
request assistance? And although he deigns 
to produce the book from amid the conglom- 
eration, does his bondage to some obscure 
oath prevent him from leaking out a elue as 
t J the master-plan of the institution? 

Is it fair to confront freshmen— or for that 
matter upperclassmen— with this maze with- 
out so much as a compass? Is there any par- 
ticular talent, attribute, or intuition which 
cnaljles a minority cult to traverse these 
dreaded aisles and stacks selecting, appar- 
ently with ease, the volumes to fulfill their 
needs? 

Admittedly thi.s problem is exaggerated 
fcr effect; it is, however, a real and definite 
problem. This letter i.":; submitted with all due 
respect to library employees, with commen- 
dation and gratitude for their assistance, and, 
indeed, in an effort to lighten their burden 
of work. 

The proposed solution for this problem is a 
library orientation course. This could be un- 
dertaken either as a segment of the freshman 
orientation program, or as a required unit in 
Composition I. Since many grades depend 
largely on research papers and projects, the 
value of this course is obvious. 

UNDERWOOD FIVE 



Editor, The Call: 

For the past few days a sign appeared 
in the student union conceniiug a letter that 
appeared in the first issue of the Call. It 
read, "Do you care about your social life 
at aarion?" 

At the Student Senate meeting of October 
2. the problem of the "revised" calendar 
was discussed. Absolutely noUiing was ac- 
complished. The only results were that the 
social commiyt^ .^%s. inadeqjiatp^ pn^, tljat^ 
the budget has been juggled. "* 

Originally, $8,000 was allocated for the 
Homecoming Dance. This was quickly cut 
to $5,000 with $1,400 finally being spent (this 
is due to the inadequacy of the social com- 
mittee). Almost anyone can figure out that 
an excess of $3,600 remains that goes back 
into the budget. What I want to know is 
v/hy Dr. Elliott does not ccme out and "tell 
it like it is." Why must we always bo double 
talked? If the social committee is inadequate, 
vvhy isn't something done about it? The pro- 
blem of conflicts on weekend activities was 
mentioned, and was quickly remedied with 
a dance on weekends with a combo. This 
was further complicated by the suggestion 
to have fraternities, sororities and class of- 
ficers sponsor these dances. The only pro- 
blem is that a lot of these groups do not 
have any operating capital. However, Dr. 
Elliott quickly added that the Senate would 
sub.sidize these activities. 

Question: Why mn^t Dr. Elliott avoid is- 
sues, and why didn't he tell us the truth 
about the facilities for our activities? 

Space approval forms for all activities were 
presented to the Student Senate. Why did 
Dr. Elliott say that these wore not approved? 

Dr. Elliott, I challenge you. Why don't you 
come out and tell us the truth fcr a change? 

TERRY CARLSON 



To the Editor of the Call: 

1 feel that it is my responsibility to answer 
the letter in last week's Call about the inter- 
view the social committee had with Dr. El- 
liott. 

First, I would like to give the students a 
little background information. During second 
semester of last year, all campus organiza- 
tions turned in budget requests for the '68- '69 
school year. One of these requests was from 
the social committee. They asked for a budget 
of $30,000, but it was not possible for them 
to receive this much money. However, we 
did give them more money than they ever 
had before. 

Besides having the largest budget they 
ever had, a resolution was also passed last 
year, by the student body, allowing the social 
committee to charge at big functions. Why 
they have not brought to Clarion big name 
entertainment is beyond me. 

Now as to last week's letter. I do not have 
and am in no way responsible for what is or 
is not placed on the calendar. However, I do 
feel that as President of the Clarion Student 
Association, it is my responsibility to the 
students of Clarion State College to find out 
why the many activities have been cancelled 
or changed, and I promise that I WILL find 
out. 

Once again, I would like to remind"^he 
student body that all Senate meetings are 
open aod tbat if yia have scmetluag trottir-' 



EDITORS COMMENT ON STUDENT 
SENATE ISSUE 

In answer to the two letters above, the 
editor of the Call would hke to make the fol- 
lowing comment: 

Many complaints and opinions have been 
made by students concerning the changes 
made in the social calendar, ani everyone 
wants to know the answers. But few stu- 
dents have initiated an investigation to find 
out exactly why the changes have been made. 
It's easy to say that Dr. Elliott. Dr. Nanov- 
sky, or someone else is responsible for what 
has happened, but no one has been able 
to pinpoint the cause to .any one person or 
to any one group. It may just be possible 
that the wrong persons are being blamed. 

For this reason I urge the students on 
this campus to take the responsibility of find- 
ing out tlie facts of this issue so that the 
whole truth can bo published for the bene- 
fit of the entire student body. We have what 
I feel is a legitimate issue— an issue which 
deserves satisfactory answers. But we will 
never find these answers by shouts of injus- 
tice or unfairness. We must instead be willin?? 
to stick our necks out to make sure that 
our criticism is valid. With proof and facts 
as our ammunition, we cao produce results. 

—THE EDITOR 



NATIONALITY PROVERBS 

German: He who would have the last 
drop out of the can has the lid fall 
on his nose. - 

Polish: Where there is a stork, there 

is peace. 
Italian: A cask of wine works more 

miracles than a church full of 

saints. 




Page 3 



New CSC Faculty Members Listed 



THIS SIGN is just one of many such signs that adorn the sororities, while many ot the team "^^"^^^ers themselves 
fences and scoreboard at the home football games; this belong to a fratermty. Nor can we forget the Ph Sigma 
s us one of the ways in which the Greek letter organ- Epsilon cannon that makes an appearance at all home 
TzatLns on our cam'pus help to support the Golden games. The Theta Xi bell has also been known to make 
Eagles. The lovely usherettes who help you find a seat an appearance at some games. 
in the crowded stadium are compliments of the Clarion 



Venango News 

Freshmen usually come to college with the attitude that they are automa- 
tically "low man on the totem pole." Frosh at Clarion's Venango Campus have 
found this idea untrue. 

I With a ratio of 2:1 between freshmen and sophomores, what can you ex- 
pect This year's freshmen at Venango, in addiUon to their sheer numbers, 
tiossess an admirable abundance of enthusiasm and interest. Reflections of 

I the enthusiasm fill the two following articles. 



Freshmen Note 
Long Walk But 
Friendly Spirit 



By MARTHA DUDROW 

Now that the confusion of settling in a 
strange routine has calmed, there is time to 
fi'tid out what the Frosh think of Venango. 

bne thing is clear— it's a long walk into 
toVvn! The general attitude was that walking 
six, miles to and from town a couple of times 
a week is not ordinary. For some, it's moi-e 
tl\^n they have walked at one time in their 

lives. 

,AU the freshmen I have talked to like the 
friendly atmosphere. Living with friends 
makes the difference because we get to 
kmw what they're really like, and they get 
to know us. 

^It is a bit hard to get used to the methods 
used by some of our profs— at least that's 
what some Frosh have said. Others are, Uke 
myself, amazed that it is similar to high 
school. There is a lot more competition, how- 
cfver. 

Nothing to do at "Venango U" seems to be 
a bit of a problem. As most of the Frosh are 
from the Pittsburgh area, they are used to 
doing something all the time, and as we're 
so far from the "action" that it gets boring. 
But as the year goe.s on,, it might get better. 
After all, we've been here about three weeks! 

As Dr. Morgan said, "the food won't be 
Uke mother's." It isn't. But the general opin- 
ion is that it could be worse. I know for my- 
self that it's better than the food at our high 
school cafeteria. 

Breakfast leaves something to be desired, 
but then not many eat breakfast. It is food. 
We'd be in a mess if they didn't serve any- 

tbing! 

A lot of Frosh were surprised to find that 
Venango Campus was better than they had 
afiUcipated. The first thought of many when 
t^y received the letter was "Where is Ven- 
apgo?" Now they k-iow! 

*,The atmosphere is friendly and the pres- 
^p-e is not as great to "be someone." Per- 



sonal interest in us surprised me. I had been 
told that college profs couldn't care less 
about us, but they do, and I guess Venango's 
size has a lot to do with it. All in all, me 
freshmen like V. C, 

De-Dinking Rite 
Ends Activities, 
Kangaroo Court 

By SAM BUSCO 

"To all the joys of student life, our hearts 
will ever thrill." 

Tlie Alma Mater of Clarion State College 
expresses the feelings and thoughts of college 
students all over the world. College life and 
its many activities will always hold a soft 
spot in the hearts of students. 

But the one event that will remain indelibly 
in their minds is Freshman Initiation Week, 
fetter known as Frosh Week. However, the 
students at Venango Campus will remember 
Frosh Week more than the other college stu- 
dents because it was a special Fresh Week, 
or at least it seemed that way to all of us. 

Our extraordinary Frosh Week began 
promptly at midnight on Sunday, September 
22, and lasted through the following Saturday 
at "de-dinking" ceremonies. The long week 
included such activities as physical fitness 
exercises, shaving cream and water battles, 
scavenger hunts, bust-improvement exer- 
cises, jogging through the dormitory, and 
the unforgettable session of kangaroo court 
with its revolution. Who could forget any of 
these? 

A little color was added to the classes when 
the Freshmen entered backwards with their 
blue and gold dmks, black and white signs, 
and brightly-colored book bags. The halls of 
the classroom building came alive with air 
raids and ridiculous sophomore stunts. 

Even though these stunts were not sup- 
posed to provide excuses for the sadistical 
whims of Sophomores and were supposed to 
be "all m fun," some freshmen believed 
otherwise. Yet, the fact that they still will- 



ingly agreed to all the activities of Frosh 
Week just to have fun proves that the Fresh- 
man class of 1968-1969 is extraordinary. |^s 
one sophomore told us. "This year's Fresh- 
man das'; is the greatest. They're so mudh 
fun." This opinion is something we freshmen 
can be proud of. 

Frosh Week has given many of us a chance 
t.-) meet some potential life-time friends. How 
could a man forget that he met his be^ 
friend during a whipped cream and egg bat- 
tle during Frosh Week at Venango Campus? 
Then there are those cf us who used to be 
shy, timid, or afraid of being with people. 
Frosh Week and its events have given iB a 
chance to come out of our shells and feel 
comfortable where we used to be nervous, 
participate where we used to simply watch, 
or to laugh when we used to cry. Such an 
important pha.se of life can never be for- 
gotten. 

Consequently, Frosh Week at Venango 
Campus WAS a very special one, simply be- 
cause it was OURS. We were the ones Who 
wrote home about it. We were the ones who 
told friends about it. And we were the ones 
who had the fun. The Frosh Customs Hand- 
book is right when it states: "You will long 
remember this period and enjoy many hearty 
l.iughs about it." 



There arc 66 new members of the Clarion 
State College faculty and staff. 

This number includes five who teach at the 
Venango Campus, two temporary instructors 
for the first semester, two wlu) are rejoining 
the Clarion faculty after teaching ebewhere, 
and several replacements for faculty mem- 
bers on leave of absence. Of the 66, about a 
dozen do administrative work; most of the 
other 54 are full-time teachers. 

Here is the list by department, division, or 
office : 
Art: Susan Coerr, instructor. 
Biology: Roland D. Gassier, instructor; 
John C. Hutchins, instructor; and Gilbert L. 
Twiest, associate professor. 

Business Administration: Thomas M. Bert- 
sch, instructor; Dom W. Grego, instructor; 
William Henry, instructor. 

Center for Educational Research: Don L. 
Morgan, associate professor; William F. 
Schenk, assistant professor. 

Chemistry: Philip J. Baldacchino, associate 
professor. 

^Communications: David S. Campbell, in- 
itructor; Henry L. Fueg, associate professor; 
Aatis D. Lillstrom, assistant professor. 

EducaUon: Phyllis W. Smith, assistant pro^ 
lessor; Robert M. Yoho, as.sociate professor. 
Economics: Thomas P. Reinwald, instruc- 
tor; Sarjit Singh, professor. 

Elementary EducaUon: Walter F. Koukal, 
associate professor; Arnold H. Zaeskfe, pro- 
fessor and head of the department. 

English: Ned B. Allen, professor; Terry P. 
Caesat, assistant professor; Richard K- Red- 
fern, professor. 

Financial Aid: Robert C. Segebarth, profes- 
sor. 

Foreign Languages: Vera Kramarevskaja, 
assistant professor. 



Geography: Mary M. Colby, professor. 

Health and Physical Education: .Judy 
Brown, instructor; Dixie Leas, instructor; 
Victor Liscinsky, asi^ociate professor; Charles 
E. Nanz. assistant professor; Richard Pae, 
instructor. 

In.stitute for Advanced Study for Teachers 
of Disadvantaged Youth: G. Eugene Hill, as- 
sociate professor. 

Library: Chai K. Kim, assistant professor. 

Library Science: Maru' iviazurowski, assis- 
t.-^nt professor. 

Mathematics: Nicholas J. Bezak, professor; 
Donald K, Lowe, associate professor; Sahib 
Singh, professor; Donald F. Utter, Jr., in- 
structor; Thomas V. Wimer, associate pro- 
fessor. 

Music: Burton E. Hardin, associate profes- 
sor; Bong Hi Kim, as.sociate professor; Mil- 
ton Lazich, instructor; David R. Mallory, 
assistant professor. 

Physics: Mohamed Said, associate profes- 
sor. 

Psychology: Joyce Lilly, instructor; Paul 
I. Nornes, instructor. 



Van Meter Invited to 
Speak on October 16 

The Pittsburgh Piano Teachers' Association 
has invited Dr. Robert Van Meter, head of 
tlie Music Department at Clarion State Col- 
lege, to speak at their regular monthly meet- 
ong on October 16. The subject of his speech 
vnH be preparing students for competition. 
He wiir also discuss compositions suitable 
for piano competitions at the high school 
age level. 

This invitation w?s extended as a follow- 
up to a competition in Pittsburgh last June 
27, at which Dr. Van Meter acted as adjudi- 
cator. Tliis competition featured 16 high 
school students, competing for prizes of $300 
for first place, $200 for second place, and 
$100 for third. The sponsors were Volkwein 
Brothers, and the Pittsburgh Piano Teachers' 
Association. 



Sec it on TV's 
HAPPENING '68 





,!■ 



■'Venango Campus students had a busy sche- 
(kile of events during the first week of school. 
. Monday, September 9, registration was held 
iA the classroom building from 8:30 until 3. 
During this time, all faculty members were 
kept busy registering and advising students. 
A total of 342 students register^, with 297 
ftdl-time and 45 part-time. 

On Monday evening the college reception 
^is held in the Student Uniwi. In the receiv- 
ing line were Dr. James GemmeU, president; 
Pp. Russell Morgan, administrative head of 



Venango Campus; Mr. Ray Pope, trustee for 
Clarion State College; Mr. Montgomery, pres- 
ident of Venango Campus, Inc.; their wives, 
and Tim Dunkle, acting president of the 
Venango Campus Student Senate. 

Concluding the pre-class activities, a get- 
acquainted dance for all students and faculty 
members was held Tuesday evening. Sponsor- 
ing , tl^, dance was the Social Committee, 
headed by Tim Dunkle and Dorothy Mackey. 
Music for the dance was provided by the 
Fenders. 



Miss America. Shoes 

By SMARTAI.RE. 
$11.99 —- Black, Brown 

Try tripping along the sidewalk In this 
little boy oxford by Miss America. Hearty 
shag trimmed with patenlite for veMufOus 
all-girl girls. 

Crooks Shoes 

Main Street 
CLAlllON, PA. 



Speech and Dramatic Arts: Marion M. 

Odcll Carr, assistant professor. 

Special Education: William A. Brady, In- 

istructor; Richard D. Hetrick, instructor; 

nitbert A. Kecnan, associate professor; Jack 

^H Smith, associate professor. 

Social Science: R. Wallace Brcw.stcr, pro- 
fessor; Sunda Cornetti, assistant professor; 
Mohamm:id 1. Khan, professor. 

Student Affairs: George W. Curtis, Jr., as- 
sociate professor; Stanley P. Ilallman, resi- 
Jdent director of forest Manor; Peter H. 
Nachtwey, as.sociate professor; Betty Lou 
Reisman, assistant professor; Ethel B. Vairo, 
associate professor. 

Student Teaching and Placement: John L. 
Ree.se, assistant professor; Ralph W. Sheriff, 
associate professor. 

Venango Campus 
Engli.sh: Lee W. Heilman. instructor. 
Geography: Gergely Markos, instructor. 
Mathematics: Loii Mushrush, instructor. 
Music: Larry S. Lnndis, instructor. 
Physical Science: Glenn R. McElhattan, as- 
sistant professor. 







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Page 4 



THE CALL 



Clarion State College, Clarion, Peraisylviifla 



Friday, October 4, tOOT 




t * 




Swimming Team is Good Girls' Intramural 
. Sports Programs 

Possibility jor J\ear ruture jvo^ Bcin«^ Of f ered 



Clarion State will soon add another athletic 
team to the list— swimming. The students 
of Clarion arc fortunate enough to have some 
of the best facilities along with first class 
equipment. 

This year will be a building year for the 
swim team. Around the end of October, a 
general call will be issued for all boys, pre- 
ferably freshmen and sophomores, with some 
swimming experience. They will go through 
a training program which will run until 
March. Intercollegiate competition, in the 
small college division, will be initiated next 
year. Possible competing this year will de- 
pend upon the overau success of the team. 

The diving events will be coached by Mr. 



Donald Leas, the swimming by Mr. Charles 
Nanz. Mr. Nanz was captain of his swimming 
team at the University of Pittsburgh; he 
comes to us from the Baldwin school system, 
where he taught physical education and 
coached swimming for four and one-half 
years. While at Baldwin, Mr. Nana^ started 
the swimming team and compiled a record 
of 34 wins and 18 losses. 

One major problem, as seen by Mr. Nanz, 
is the fact that up until now many of our 
good high school swimmers have never con- 
sidered Clarion, mainly because of the lack 
of good facilities. With the new pool. Cla- 
rion hopes to attract the kind of swimmers 
whq will make possible a first-rate team. 



An intramural sports program is currently 
being offered to the women students of Cla- 
rion State College. 

Volleyball and badminton are two sports 
for the fall program; although badminton 
is an individual sport, volleyball teams haVe 
been formed. Tournaments for both sports 
will take place Monday and Thursday eve- 
nings in Waldo Tippin gymnasium. Trophies 
will be awarded at the end of the season 
for inter-squad and individual performances. 

Schedules will be posted near the intramur- 
al room in Tippin gym. If there are any 
questions, please contact Miss Shope, the (Jo- 
ordinator of the women's program. 



Camera Catches Action in Geneva Game 



Eagles Claw Geneva Tornadoes 



In a game highligiitcd by Fred Wickstrom's 
97-yard return of an intercepted pass. Cla- 
rion rolled to its second victory in three 
outings. After the Delaware loss, last week, 
Coach Jacks revamped the offensive lineup 
with nine starting sopliomores. 

Geneva drew first blood midway through 
the first quarter. The Tornadoes recovered 
a Clarion fumble on the CSC 35. A 31-yard 
pass from Greg H:.!iey to Pete Quinn high- 
lighted a drive that carried to the Eagles 
one; Haney sneaked over from there: Geneva 
7, CSC 0. The Clarion defense v;as having 
trouble adapting to Geneva's surprise shot- 
gun offense. 

First play following a poor Geneva punt, 
Joe Abal romped fov a touchdown with 2:22 
left in the first quarter. Dorish parted the 
uprights to make it 7 ell. Gcn^^va threatened 
the lead touchdown at the end of the first 
quarter, but a Wickstrom interception on Cla- 
rion 3 cut it short. 

Although it didn't appear obvious until the 
second half, a key factor in the turniiig point 
of the game was when Greg Haney was 
forced out of the game with six minutes 
left in the second quarter with an injury. 
The Tornado quarterback looked good, 
scrambled well, and completed four out of 
five passes for a total of 99 yards. 

A minute and 35 seconds after the new Gen- 
eva quarterback entered the game, Fred 
Wickstrom intercepted a Phillips pass on 
the Clarion three lad raced dov/n the left 
sideline lor a touchdown. It marked his se- 
cond interception: two cf Clarion's five. Dor- 
ish booted the point: CSC 14, Geneva 7. 

Clarion used their time-cuts to stall the 
clock. Joe Abal, who had been hitting the 
middle well, plun.'^ed over from the one with 
13 seconds left on the clock. 

Clarion's well balanced ground-aerial at- 
tack dominated the second half. Bob Oberdorf 
capped a 55-yard drive by bowling over from 
the three. Clarion now held a commanding 
28-7 lead. They pfocceded to add another 
seven to it. In a little more than a minute,^ 
Fran Sirianni picked off Clarion's third in- 
terception and returned it 18 yards to the 
Geneva 34. Jim Becker scored from there 
on the next play: a pass from Erdeljac. 



Dorish kicked his fifth successive extra point: 
SCS 39, Geneva 7. 

The game's final score came with 10 min- 
utes left on the scoreboard. Bill Wise pushed 
in from the one. John Dorish remained in 



Lock Haven Will 
Field One of Best 
Teams For Eagles 

Lock Haven will be putting one of its best 
teams in years against Clarion State on Sat- 
urday night. Lock Haven has a well-balanced 
attack and defense, experience, and good 
depth. The team has won one game while 
losing two, but it has a lot more potential 
tlian its losses to California and Maryland 
might indicate. 

The defensive line headed by Arrow Smith, 
all-state defensive lineman last year, and 
Brenner, the fivc-fcot, nine-inch 210-pound 
senior who doubles on offense, are tough 
on the ground. 

Offensively, Lock Haven usually works out 
of a T-formation with a split end. Sopho- 
more quarterback RIiulc is a good scrambler 
ani a constant threat with the long bomb. 
He has some top receivers in Vaughn at 
split end. who caught two touchdown passes 
against California, in Randolph at left end, 
who spnnts the 100-yard dash in 9.7 and 
in Geise, a right end v/ith a good pair of 
hands. 

McNeils, a six-foot, three-inch 205-pound 
junior, eats up yardage, and Smith, another 
junior who stands five-foot, 11 inches and 
weighs 190 pounds, is another good runner. 

The Lock Haven line is strongest on the 
right side, their secondary average. Hooks, 
flats, and R-back patterns have hurt the de- 
fense against California and Maryland. Cla- 
rion can be expected to pass against them, 
test the right side, and work the left side 
of the line. 



INTRAMURAL ATHLETICS — 1968-69 

DUE DATES AND ROSTER ENTRIES FOR EACH SPORT 

ACTIVITY— DUE DATE ROSTER REQUIREMENTS PLACE 

Minimum Maximum 

Touch (flag) football— Tues., Oct. 1, '68 : 7 15 Mem. Stadium 

Golf (Medal)— Tues., Oct. 8 OPEN • Hi Level 

Soccer— Tues., Oct. 15 . 7 15 Mem. Stadium 

Co-Rcc. Volleyball— Tues., Oct. 22 8 women 8 men W. S. Tippin 

Squash— Tues., Oct. 29 3 6 W. S. Tippin 

Chess— Tues., Nov. 5 1 '1 Student Union 

Bowling— Tues.. Nov. 5 5 10 Ragley 

Volleyball— Tues.. Nov. 12 6 15 W. S. Tippin 

Team Table Tennis— Tues., Nov. 19 4 8 W. S. Tippin 

Ba.sketball— Tues., Dec. 17 6 13 W. S. Tippin 

Handball— Tues., Jan. 14, '69 4 9 W. S. Tippin 

Bridge— Tues.. Jan. 14 4 9 Student Union 

Water Basketball— Tues., Feb. 4 5 10 Swim Pool 

Wrestling— Tues., Feb. 11 OPEN W. S. Tippin 

3 Man Basketball— Tues., Feb. 18 3 6 W. S. Tippin 

Badminton (singles)— Tues., Feb. 25 1 1 W. S. Tippin 

Badminton (doubles)— Tues., Feb. 25 2 2 W. S. Tippin 

Call Pool— Tues., March 4 3 6 Student Union 

Table Tennis (singles)— Tues., March 11 1 1 W. S. Tippin 

Table Tennis (doubles)— Tues., March 11 2 2 W. S. Tippin 

Foul Shooting— Tues.. March 18 5 10 W. S. Tippin 

Swimming— Tues., March 18 OPEN Swim Pool 

Co-Rec. Badminton— Tues., March 25 2 2 W. S. Tippin 

Softball— Tues.. April 1 10 21 Mem. Stadium 

Track & Field— Tues., April 8 OPEN Mem. Stadium 

Any group may enter a team by filling out the official roster sheet and returning 
it to the Intramural Office (117 W. S. Tippin) or to Mr. Nanz. Intramural Director 
(102 W. S. Tippin) on or before the due date listed above. All entries must be ac- 
companied by a $2.50 forfeit fee which will be returned at the end of the activity 
schedule providing the team appeared and was ready for the activity as scheduled. 
All needed equipment will be provided by the Intramural Department including rules, 
colored jerseys and balls. Teams may be formed by dorm, fraternity and friendly 
groups. 

Copies of the Clarion State College ititramural Constitution may be obtained from 
the Intramural office. 



good form by adding another pfoint after 
touchdown. 

Chuck Koval grabbed himself an intercep- 
tion as Geneva's passes seemed to be hanging 
all over the sky; and Larry McNulty ended 
the game on another interception. 

John Dorish, playing end for the first time, 
had two receptions for 54 yards, in addition 
to his six points as kicker. Joe Abal's 88 
yards rushing in 19 carries, as fullback, kept 
the ground game moving. Fred Wickstrom 
was, unintentionally, a top Geneva receiver. 



Clarion 

23 

9 

8 

6 

177 

200 



GAME STATISTICS 

Total First Dov/ns 

First Downs Rushing 

First Downs Passing 

First Downs Penalties 

Net Yards Rushmg 

Net Yards Passing 



Geneva 

15 

7 

6 

2 

115 

194 



14-26 Passes Attempted and Completed 11-21 

377 Total Yards Gained in Offense 309 

6/35 No. of Punts (punting average) 7/34 

42 Score 7 



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Friday, October 4, 1968 



THE CALL 



Clarion State College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



Page 5 




Band Day Panorama as Seen From the Air 



Another Opening, Another Show 



On Saturday, September 28, the Clarion 
State College Golden Eagle Bsnd played host 
to 1,257 bandsmen, color guards, and major- 
ettes from 13 bands representing several 
counties in Western Pennsylvania. The 13 
bands which participated in the colorful event 
brought an overflow crowd of 5,000 specta- 
tors to view the game and p^^geantry of 
marching and music. 

An event of this n.iture aptly demonstrated 
the musical talent which is inherent in the 
Marching Band at Clarion State College. A 
pre-game show by the band featured the 
1968 entrance with fanfare and "It's a Big 
Wide Wonderful World." Two intricate drill 
routines were executed to the strains of Ger- 
shwin's "I Got Rhythm." This included line 
drills and floating diamonds. The band con- 
cluded the pre-game program with a kick- 
down dance to 'Wrap Your Troubles in 
Dreams." The talents of the high school 



English Honors Group 
Holds First Meeting 

Sigma Tau Delta, national honorary Eng- 
lish fraternity, recently held its first meet- 
ing. The meeting W3s presided over by Linda 
Mason, president. She and the other officers- 
Sharon Hall, vice president; Rosemarie Sz- 
czerba, secretary-treasurer, and Vicki Vock- 
reit, social chairman— plan to work together 
to make this a productive year for the fra- 
ternity. 

The fraternity's purpose is the "stimulating 
of a desire ... To seek to express life in 
terms of truth and beauty, and to make first- 
hand acquaintanceship with the chief literary 
masterpieces." Membership is limited to up- 
perclass English majors with a 3.0. 

This spring Sigma Tau Delta is publishing 
The Clarion, Clarion's literary magazine. This 
activity will, of course, keep all the members 
busy. In addition, Sigma Tau Delta will meet 
as usual once a month to hear a member 
of the faculty speak on subjects related to 
English. Among last year's speakers were 
Dr. Gilbert Neimnn, Dr. H. W. Park, and 
Dean Still. Sigma Tau Delta offers its mem- 
bers the opportunity to teach a college class 
each spring. 

Right now Sigma Tau Delta is collecting 
material for The Clarion. Anyone is invited 
to submit original works for publication any- 
time this month eitiier by leaving their ma- 
terial in the English Department office or 
by giving it to one of the officers of Sigma 
Tau Delta. 



bands were also displnyed in music and 
marching ability. The half-time show consis- 
ted of the formation of the letters CSC by 
the 13 bands which were outlined by the 
members of the Golden Eagle Band. In this 
furmation, the massed bands played "El Cap- 
iti.n March," "Autumn Leaves," in honor 
of the Clarion Autumn Leaf Festival, "Am- 
erica the Beautiful," "Song for the Young," 
"Washington Post," and "Alma Mater." Bill 
Severance, CSC male twirler, was featured 
during the "Washington Post" march. 

Mr. Rex Mitchell, composer and arranger 
for the CSC band, wrote another number 
especially for Band Day, "Song for the 



Music Clinic 
Held at CSC 



A Junior High School General Music Clinic 
will be held at Clarion State College on Oct- 
ober 5. This will be the first in a series 
of four such clinics offered on the subject 
of Junior High Music this year. It is being 
held in conjunction with the Pennsylvania 
Music Educators Association. Beginning at 
9:30, the first session will be held in the 
Music Department of the Old Science Build- 
ing, and will run until 11:30. It will be con- 
tinued in the afternoon from 1 to 3. 

The clinician is Mrs. Betty Joner,, a Junior 
High Music InstrucLor in the Greenwich, Con- 
necticut, public schcx)ls. She is a graduate 
ot the New England Conservatory of Music 
in Boston, Massachusetts, and has been an 
adjudicator at the Western Ma.'jsaehusetts 
Chorale Festival. She has boon the guest 
speaker to the Nev.' Hamp:ihire Music Edu- 
cators, also. 

Mrs. Jones is a nev/ly-appointcd member 
of the state's Advisory Committee on Music 
Education for Connecticut, and when ap- 
proached for clinical work in Penns^lvania, 
had recently completed a session as a mem- 
ber of the Guest Faculty of the Hartt Col- 
lege of Music, University of Hartford, Hart- 
ford, Connecticut. < 

She is co-author of "Tlie Making Music 
Your Own" series (Books VII and VIII), 
which were published in 19G7-68 by Silver 
Burdett Company. She will speak on the topic 
"The Active Involvement of Junirr Hitjh Stu- 
dents in the General Music Program through 
analytical listening, creative improvisation 
and instrumental experience." The clinic will 
bo open to the public, free cf charge. 



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Young," in honor of the young people who 
devoted tiieir time to making music. 

Rehearsals for the bands were held at 10:30 
a.m. at Memorial Stadium with Dr. Michalski 
directing the massed bands in procedures 
foi the half-time show. The high school stu- 
dents responded quickly to the commands 
which were evidenced in a smooth perfor- 
mance. 

Each band director indicated his interest 
in returning again next year for the annual 
event. Plans are being made to enlarge the 
event to 20 bands for a bigger and better 
Band Day of music and drill for 1969. 



Student Union Board 
Receives New Rules 

Tuesday's meeting of the Student Union 
Board was called to order by Chairman Owen 
Winters. Present were Dr. John Nanovsky, 
Bill Nanovsky, Randy Burns, Ray Yutzy, 
Laura King, Tom Paolino, and Pam and Tony 
Mattern. 

After the reading of the minutes of the 
previous meeting, the board decided that any 
campus organization having a coat of arms 
was to submit it for mounting in the Student 
Union Snack Bar. The coat of arms must 
be no larger than four feet by four feet. 
Dr. Nanovsky war, authorized to secure a 
Clarion State College coat of arms, no larger 
than five feet by five feet, to be mounted 
in the Student Union Snack Bar. 

Dr. Nanovsky then brought to the attention 
of the board the need for a set of rules 
for the Student Day Room. After lengthy 
discussion, the following set of rules, submit- 
ted by Dr. Namvsky, was passed by the 
Student Union Board: 

1. During the regular academic hours, prior 
t.:i 6:30 p.m., the room is not to bo scheduled 
for any meetings. 

2. After the regular academic hours, begin- 
ning with 6:30 p.m., the day room can be 
scheduled for use through the Student Union 
Director's Office — u.^iiig the normal space re- 
quest form provided by the Dean of Students' 
office. 

3. No furniture or Student Union property 
is to be taken from, the day room in pre- 
paration for meeting use. 

4. No decorations, posters, etc., can be 
hung without permission of the Student Union 
Director. 

5. No furniture or equipment is to be 
brought into the day room witliout permission 
of the Student Unio'i Director. 

6. No food, other .ban day students' packed 
luncheons may be brought into the day room, 
except for items pu^ciiased at the snack bar. 

7. Access to the custodial staff room, off 
the Day Room, is to be in effect for Student 
Union custodial administration staff, any time 
the building is in use. 

The Student Board then compiled a request 
for $11,419.78 additional funds from the Cla- 
rion Student Association. This request includ- 
ed funds for the hiring of two fuH-tim^ per- 
sons to supervise the Student Union. TSie 
Board then authoriz'^d Dr. Nanovsky to $eU 
all obsolete Student Union equipment, with 
all money to be added to the Student Union 
Improvement Fund. 



CSC to Aid 
Highway Dept. 



m des- 



In an attempt to prevent unnecessaj 
truclion of archaeological .-utes in the course 
of needed highway construction, the Pennsyl- 
vania Historical and Museum Commission 
has selected two Pennsylvania State Ccdleges 
to review future construction plans and con- 
ducting on-site inspections of proposed road- 
ways to determine whether archaet^ogical 
.sites are present. Clarion State College and 
California State College will act as cooperat- 
ing institutions in an agreement between the 
commission and the Pennsylvania Depart- 
ment of Highways concerning highway sal- 
vage archaeology. Clarion's Archaeological 
Laboratory will be responsible for Butler, 
Indiana, Jefferson, Clarion, and Armstrong 
counties while California will look after some 
of the southwestern counties of Pennsylvaiua, 



A PEEK AT GREEKS 



ZETA TAU ALPHA 

Congratulations to Barb Dimmorling, Karen 
Skirpan, Judy Karabincs, and Leanae Mai- 
cinko on making the Dean's List. 

Kathy Hughes, Paula Zezza, Judy Held, 
Karen Yuczig, Lynn Schulcr, Karla Kurfess 
and Judy Grau are presently student teach- 
ing. 

Barb Dimmerling is co-hoad of the cheer- 
leaders. 

DELTA ZETA 

The Delta Zetas have begun work on their 
float for the homecoming parade and are 
anxiously looking forward to the big day. 

Pink rbses to our sister, Vicki Wilcox, who 
h£s been chosen TKE Sweetheart. Vicki will 
represent Tau Kappa Epsilon in the Miss 
CSC pageant next spring as well as in other 
various activities throughout the year. 

Welcome back to Susie McCarthy, who is 
back on campus after a short visit to the 
hospital. 

ALPHA SIGMA TAU 

The Taus finally got to wear their new 
suits on campus last Monday when we had 
our first Color Day of the semester. 

We would like to wish the best of luck to 
tlie girls on campus who are starting a new 
sorority. Also, good luck to all Greeks who 



are busily working an their floats for Honie- 
cuniing next wcvk. 

The Taus will Iv :;clling stationery next 
week as a .service project. 

ALPHA SIGiWA ALPHA 

Sister Pat Simon won Iho AA Division 
crown in the Leeland Lulies" Golf League.. 
A lil)erai arts student, Pat i.s majorinj^ in, 
Anthrapology. 

The Alpha Sigs olocted a new rush chair- 
man, Nancy Wrscolt, a junior majoring ii»_ 
elementary education. 

Alpha Sigma Alpha misses those sistcrsi 
n(/W student teaching;: Barb Degano, Linda* 
Aufsceser, Linda IJracco, Marie Tegano, El- 
len Vaile, Janet Coylc, Put Derikart, and 
Addie Ferrari. f 

English Department News 

The Engli.sh department this year plans 
t.) revise the entire English curriculum. Man.v 
courses will be re\i.scd and new ones ara 
being planned. The graduate program is now 
being completed. A committee composed of 
Drs. Allen, Barber, Lockard. Park, and Wil- 
son are busy working out the details for 
the graduate program. Three new professors 
have been added to tlie department: Dr. Red- 
fern, Mr. Caesar, and Mr. Heilman. 



VISTA Representatives on 
Campus to Tell of Work 



Field representatives from VISTA, (Volun- 
teers In Service To America) came to Cla- 
rion on October 1 r.nd 2 to speak for and 
about their organization. 

VISTA is a program which began four 
years ago as a parallel to the Peace Corps; 
its main objective is to form a bridge between 
poverty and opportunity in the underdevel- 
oped and impoverif;heu areas of the United 
States ahd its territories. 

To qualify ioj the VISTA program, a per- 
son must be at least 18 years old and must 
be a citizen of the United States; there is 
no upper age limit. With these minimum 
requirements and with the numerous appli- 
cants, VISTA has changed their emphasis, 
whereby they can be more selective now 
in choosing volunteers than v/hcn the pro- 
gram was started. VISTA is a growing pro- 



ject with over 5,000 workers either in the 
field or participating in the six-v/eck train- 
ing period. 

No volunteer is sent to any area unless 
a sponsor, either a local or county agency, 
requests such a per.;on. Volunteers serve for 
a minimum of ons year in any of the 50 
states. District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, 
Virgin Islands, Guam, and the Trust Terri- 
tory of the Pacific Islands. They receive a 
monthly allowance covering clothes, housing, 
food, and transportation in the area to which 
they are assigned, as well as $75 a month 
for personal incidentals. In addition, $.50 is 
set aside each mouth and is paid to the 
volunteer at the completion of his service. 

For further information, write to VISTA, 
Washington, D.C. 20506. 



Pins, Rings and Bells 

PINS 

Al Stramiello, Sigma Tau Gamma, to Mar- 
sha Wurst, Delta Zota. 

RINGS 

Dick DeMarte, CSC, to Debbie Showden, 
Clarion. 

Clint Doolittle. CSC, to Gcrt Ilointz, CSC, 

Paul Morris, Tau Kappa Epsilon, to Georgia 
La.vton, CSC. 

Ensign Daniel Ki'nodinst, Norfolk, Virgin- 
ia, to Wondy Chriiucff, Alpha Sigma Alpha. 

Bill Ondriczek, Naiity Gio, to Linda Sher- 
man, Alpha Sigma Alpha. 

Speech Instrument 
Designed by Dr. Hartley 

Dr. Harold Hartley, coordinator of speech 
patiiology and audiology, and Stephanie Tala- 
bcr, a senior at Clarion, spent a very pro- 
ductive summer designing a measuring in- 
strument to assess a speaker's awareness of 
his own speech. 

The purpose of the instrument is to mea- 
sure the improvement of the speech of a 
stutterer by enabling him to hear his own 
voice. The test has been administered to 270 
individuals from age ten to adulthood, includ- 
ing seventy with a stuttering problem and 
two hundred v.ith a normal voice and no 
speech problem. 

Presently, Stephanie and Dr. Hartley, with 
the aid of Dr. Lewis in statistics, are in the 
process of preparing a paper on their experi- 
mentation and the results of the testing. 
Stephanie and Dr. Hartley are co-authors of 
the paper and it will be read by Stephanie at 
the National Convention of the American 
Speech and Hearing Association in Denver, 
Colorado, November 15. After the results are 
announced at the convention, the measuring 
instrument will be of use to all speech de- 
partments. 

Stephanie, whoso home is in Poughkeepsie, 
New York, is presently doing her student 
teaching in speech pathology in the Clarion 
Area School District. After graduation from 
Clcrion, she plans to continue her studies 
leading to a master's degree in speech path- 
ology. 



New Planetarium Now Operational 




Mr. Jack Blaiue, Director of Plauetari luu, Views New Projection lutitriuueut 



Page 6 



THE CALL — Clarion State College. Clarion, Pennsylvania 



Friday, October 4, 1968 




Wickstrom, Oberdorf Named 
Football Players of the Week 
For Delaware, Geneva Contests 



Coach Al Jacks and his coaching staff 
named sophomore wingback Bob Oberdorf 
Player of the Week for the Delaware State 
game played September 21. 

Bob, seemingly unaffected by the long bus 
trip to Dover, was able to turn in a tremen- 
dous individual performance. He caught five 
passes for 79 yards and collected 29 yards 
rushing, only 20 yards less ihan Clarion's 
total rushing yardage for the afternoon. Un- 
fortunately, Bob's .efforts were in vain as 
the Eagles went down to defeat at the hands 
of the much bigger Delaware team. 

"Obie," a sophomore from Leechburg, was 
a standout athlete on last year's freshman 
team, and it appears that he will be a con- 
tinued asset to Coach Jacks' Eagles in the 



future. Although only five feet 10 inches tall 
and weighing 160 pounds, he has become 
a star through his desire, his fine moves, 
and his excellent hands. 

Bob is definitely in the winning habit; the 
Delaware game broke a personal string of 
30 consecutive wins, including two W.P.I.A.L. 
high school championships. With the help of 
individual players like Bob Oberdorf, the Ea- 
gles will be able to accumulate just such 
an impressive winning streak in the future. 

Fred Wickstrom was chosen Player of the 
Week from last week's 42-7 victory over Gene- 
va. Fred's number 22 jersey was featured 
in several of the game's highlights. 

His interception on the two-yard line, to 
stop a Tornado threat, with the score tied 



seven-all, was a preview of his grandstand 
play. His second interception was picked off 
from Clarion's own three; from there, he 
traveled 97 yards, down the left sidelines, 
t') the Geneva endzoue. The score gave Cla- 
rion what proved to be the winning margin. 
The interception followed Haney's injury, and 
took the wind out of the Tornadoes. 

In addition to his Iwo interceptions, as de- 
f»;nsive halfback, he contributed a key tackle 
when he caught a Geneva receiver along 
the sidelines who was touchdown bound. The 
five foot, nine 180-pound senior managed to 
put all that football into the first half. 

He attended high school in Edgewood where 
ho was a standout on the local team. 




PRESIDENT AND MRS. GEMMELL greet new students during an opening 
reception at Venango's campus. 



MODERN DINER 

Where Friends Meet to Eat 

Enjoy Life . . . Eat Out Here Often 
We Are Always Open 

We Cater to the Fainily Children Are Always Welcome 



Archaeological Lab to 
Cooperate With State 

The Archaeological Laboratory at the col- 
lege has been selected by the Penn.sylvania 
Historical and Museum Commission as a co- 
operating institution in an agreement between 
the Commission and the Pennsylvania De- 
partment of Highways concerning highway 
salvage archaeology. 

The new plan is designed to prevent un- 
necessary destruction of archaeological sites 
in the course of needed highway construction. 
Until now, no such state- wide program exist- 
ed in Pennsylvania, although federal regula- 
tions specifically allov; for salvage funds in 
connection with road construction. 

Under the new setup, Clarion's Archaeolo- 
gical Laboratory will be primarily responsi- 
ble for the counties of Armstrong, Butler, 
Clarion, Indiana and Jefferson in reviewing 
future construction plans and conducting on- 
site inspections of proposed roadways to de- 
termine whether archaeological sites are pre- 
sent. 

The only other state college participating 
in this plan is California State College having 
responsibility for some of the counties In 
the southwestern portion of the Common- 
wealth. 



Did Old Seminary 
Hall Have Cornerstone? 



By Gary Daurora 

With last week's placing of the cornerstone 
in the New Fine Arts Center, our thoughts 
turn to old buildings and old cornerstones. 
Did Seminary Hall have a cornerstone? and 
if so what was in it? 

When asked these questions. Dr. David Hil- 
ton, assistant to the president, said that as 
far as he and the demolition crew could 
a.sccrtain, Seminary Hall didn't have a cor- 
nerstone. However, due to the incomplete 
records kept at the time of its erection, no 
one can say positively whether or not Semin- 
ary Hall had a cornerstone. 

All that was salvaged from Seminary Hall 
v.'fs the dale stone from the front and the 
vr.rious class ivy blocks along the sides. 
These stones will cveiitually form a memorial 
on campus, which will probably include a 
scale model of Seminary Hall. 

President to Attend 
Conference at Hershey 

Dr. James Gemmell, president of Clarion 
State, will attend a conference on Monday, 
October 21, in Hcr^hcy, Pa. The meeting 
is being sponsored by the Pennsylvania As- 
.sociation of Colleges and Universities (PA- 
CU) and approximately 100 presidents will 
represent their schools for this conference 
at Hershey Hotel. 

The program for th's event includes a panel 
discussion on the topic, "New Concepts of 
Student, Faculty, and Administrative Cooper- 
ation." President Gemmell is one of three 
college presidents who will serve on the pan- 
el. He will be responsible for contributing in- 
formation to the discussion, and will be fea- 
tured as one of the key figures of the confer- 
ence program. 

Student Poems Wanted 
By National Poetry Press 

The National Poetry Press is seeking ma- 
terial for its annual college student's poetry 
anthology. 

Any student attending a junior or senior 
college is eligible to submit his verse. Due 
to space limitations, the board of judges pre- 
fers shorter work; however, there is no hmi- 
tation as to form or theme. Each po^m 
niu.st be typed or printed on a separate sheet 
of paper, and must bear the name, home 
address, and college address of the student 
submitter. 

Closing date for the manuscripts is Novem- 
ber 5; send all material to the office of 
the press, National Poetry Press, 3210 Selby 
Avenue, Los Angeles, California 90034. 

Decorations Planned 
For Homecoming Days 

Campus decorations are being planned for 
Homecoming Weekend, October 11 and 12. 

The committee, under the chairwoman Bev 
Reed, has decided to construct a platform 
with a model of Seminary Hall. Above Sem- 
inary Hall will be a revolving golden eagle; 
under it the phrase: Clarion Welcomes Edin- 
bcro, Homecoming 1968. 

The committee hopes to have the dorms 
decorated also. Anyone interested in helping 
in any way, please contact Bev Reed at 
Forest Manor, phone 226-9918. 

Hacker Book Mobile "" 
Visits Clarion Campus 

On Tuesday, October 1, the Hacker Book 
Mobile was on the Clarion Campus. The pur- 
pose of this service was to introduce to the 
faculty and students the new books published 
in the field of art. 

The majority of dooks on aisplay were 
not for sale, but all rare and unique volumes 
v/ere for sale. The list price v/as approximate- 
ly $20 per volume. 

Roy Lindquest, the representative, said the 
book mobile visits the majority of colleges 
iind universities east of the Mississippi. Cla- 
rion's faculty and students compared favor- 
ably with other schools in the amount of 
interest shown. 



Women's Housing Dean Named 



Betty Rcisman, ns.sls(ant dean of student 
affairs, will be in charge of women's housing. 

Her undergraduate i^tudy was done al Wes- 
tern Reserve University, where she majored 
in comprehensive ocionce with a concentra- 
tion in chemistry. Miss Reisman is certified 
to teach in the secondiiry science curriculum. 

Dean Reigman's graduate study was done 
a? Kent State University, where she received 



her master's degree in counseling and stu- 
dent personnel work. 

Previously, Miss Reisman serv ?d as assis- 
tant dean of student;; at Uuffalo State Univer- 
sity. She functioned as director of residence 
halls, and worked to establish junior-senior 
dormitories. 

Miss Rcisman came to Clarion because 
of the opportuniti"s it offered and its prox- 
imity to her home in East Palestine, Ohio. 



Jim Alcorn Continues Winning Ways as QB 



CLARION 
DRY CLEANING CO. 

OFFERS YOU: 

• 1 Hour Dry Cleaning: 

• Shirt Laundry • Tailoring 

• Formal Wear Rentals 

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CLOSE SAT. AT 6 P.M. 



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CLARION 



Jim Alcorn, former quarterback, and T)8 
graduate of Clarion, continues his winning 
ways for the Ohio Valley Iroiuncii in the 
Continental Football League. 



In a recent game against the Charleston 
Kockets^.rim threw touchdown passes to John 
Kmbree lor G9 yards and to Curt Lucas for 
7.1 yards for a final victory score of 28-17. 



An Anxious Moment for 
Lignelli During Game 




IMPORTANT REMINDER . . . 



Homeeomi ng 
Next Weekend!! 




It's not all coffee and doughnuts. 



It's Red Cross help with an emergency leave. It's 
being there to lend a hand. It's a cable to Vietnam 
telling a new father the happy news. It's anything 
•nd •verything your Red Cross can do for a serv- 
iceman. Whcever he is. Last year, every month 



nearly 100,000 military men were aided by th« 
Red Cross. This year, even more will need help. 
The Red Cross can do this only with your financial 
support. Your voiimteer service. Help us help. 
The American Red Cusss- 




Homeeoniing^is Here; Hiitiitierliiig lis ^ueeii 



The 1968 Homecoming; Weekend is here, 
along with the 15th Annual Autumn Leaf 
Festival, sponsored by the people of the Cla- 
rion community. 

As always, events will be highlighted by 
tomorrow's Autumn Leaf Festival Homecom- 
ing parade and the 2 p.m. football game 
with Edinboro. Heading the gala parade will 
be the Golden Eagle Marching Band and 
a Une of 25 convertibles containing campus 
organization representatives, including Miss 
CSC, Kathy Sepos, and the Homecoming 
Queen, Barbara Dimmerling. 

Attending Barb will be two representatives 
from each class and Venango Campus. They 
are seniors Sandy Brody and Laura Williams; 



juniors, Sharon Hall and Marsha Kramarik; 
.sophomores, Michel Sam and Beverly Lech- 
ner; freshmen, Pat Angel and Peggy Lus- 
conib. Leading the notables in ihe parade will 
be Dr. and Mrs. James Gemmell and mem- 
bers of the Clarion State College Board 0f 
Trustees. 

Dr. Bruce Dinsmore, college representative 
on the Autumn Leaf Festival committee, as- 
sisted by Willie Sanders, has announced the 
following college float entries and their spon- 
sors: Fraternities: Theta Xi, ^ei-vomation 
Mathias, Inc.; Tau Kappa Epsilqn, C|anrpus 
Shoes; Sigma Tau Gamma, Rea Wholesale, 
Inc.; Alpha Chi Rho, Clarion Motor Co.; Phi 
Sigma Epsilon, L. S. Taylor Engineering, 



Phi Sigma Kappa, First Seneca Bank. 

Sororities: Delta Tau Lambda, Thrift Plan; 
Sigma Sigma Sigma, S and M Harley-David- 
son Sales; Delta Zeta, Clarion County Volun- 
teer Firemen's Association; Alpha Sigma Al- 
pha, C & K Coal Co.; Alpha Sigma Tau, 
Emerson's Drivein Restaurant; Zeta Tau Al- 
pha, Central Electric Cooperative. 

Others include McKean and Jefferson Halls, 
Pennzoil Distributors; Clarion Day Students 
Association, Watson Dry Cleaning Co.; As.so- 
elation of Women Students, Clarion Builders 
Supply Co.; Senior Class (Homecoming Queen 
Float), Clarion Students Association; Venan- 
go Campus, Venango Campus Student Senate; 



Alpha P.si Omega, The Community Theater, 
and Ski Club. 

The action begins tonight with a pep rally, 
which will start in Chandler parking lot at 
6:30 p.m., followed by a snake dance through 
town led by the band and convertibles carry- 
ing the coaches and players to an area near 
the Memorial Field for a bonfire. Windmg 
up tonight's activities will be a dance from 
9 to 12 at Fore.st Manor, sponsored by the 
social committee, and featuring the 'Enter- 
tainers'. Admission will be 75 cents, with 
ID. cards. 

The Homecoming Campus Decorating Com- 
mittee erected a replica of Seminary Hall 
topped by the Golden Eagle as the central de- 



coration on the main campus. Co-chairmen 
for this committee were Beverly Reed and 
Maggie Beierle, assi-sted by Rose Slebodnik, 
Dick Fuller and Ed Goldora. 

A special event this year will be the dedi- 
cation of Clarion's new $2.5 million dollar 
gymnasium natatorium at 9:30 a.m. tomor- 
row. The modern athletic plant is named for 
the former college athletic director, Waldo S. 
Tippin. who was a moving force in planning 
for the new unit. Mr. Tippin retired in 1966 
after 31 years on the Clarion faculty. 

Coronation ceremonies for the Homecoming 
Queen, Barb Dimmerling, will be a feature 
of the half-time activities at the football 



game, with Dr. James Gemmell president 
of Clarion State, doing the crowning. 

Climaxing this full schedule of activities 
will be an Alumni Student Homecoming 
Dance in Chandler Hall from H.-M) to 11:30 
tomorrow night, with music provided by the 
■Contrails.' Following this at ll.VI to 12:30 
will be a concert with the Brooklyn Bridge.' 
an 11 -member group with four lead singers, 
two saxophones, two guitars, an organ, trum- 
pet and drums. Recommended by the Jag- 
gers, the 'Brooklyn Bridge' has played as 
back-up music in New York nightclubs. 

Closing the weekend activities will be open 
house Sunday at ail Clarion State College resi- 
dence halls from 1 p.m until 4 p.m. 




EDINBORO STATE 




Vol. 40, No. 3 



CLARION STATE COLLEGE — CLARION, PENNSYLVANIA 



Friday, October 11, 1968 



CSC Queen Barbara Dimmerling and Her Attendants 




PICTURED ABOVE are the Homecoming Queen and her attendants, chosen 
Tuesday as representatives of their classes. From left to right, the girls 
are: Peggy Luscomb, freshman; Sharon Hall, junior; Laura WilUams, sen- 



ior; Pat Angel, freshman; the Queen, Barb Dimmerling, senior; Sandy 
Brody, senior; Marsha Kramarik, junior; Bev Lechner, sophomore; and 
Michol Sam, sophomore. 



Something Has Been Done Student President Answers 
As Activities Are Scheduled Questions OH Activities 



By PEG FOLEY 

Something has finally been done! 

Three dances have been scheduled for Octo- 
ber, due to the efforts of social committee 
chairmen Suzan Albanesi and Dickie Riddle. 
These dances will be sponsored by the Greeks 
and by other organizations on campus. 

Following are the activities scheduled for 
October: Tonight the Entertainers will play 
at Forest Manor from 9 to 12 p.m., admission 
will be 75 cehts with I.D. cards. 

On October 18 the brothers of Alpha Gam- 
ma Phi will sponsor a dance in Chandler 
Hall from 9 to 12 featuring the New Hudson 
Exit, a new group fron Canton, Ohio, who 
play both psychedelic and soul music. The 
Jaggers, who recommended the group, say 
"This group can really do it." Admission will 
be 75 cents if tickets are bougnt before Octo- 
ber 18; at the door $1 will be charged. I.D.'s 



must be shown; anyone not from CSC must 
also pay $1. 

The Charades will be featured October 25 
at a dance in Chandler Hall sponsored by 
the sisters of Zeta Tau Alpha. Admission 
price is 75 cents at the door; if purchased 
before, the cost is 50 cents. 

One student put it this way: 

"With student support. Clarion can continue 
to have entertainment on weekends, and we 
can have a full schedule with no more open 
weekends. Without student support, the social 
committee and the other campus organiza- 
tions are powerless. Back your fellow stu- 
dents who are trying to bring a social life 
to this campus. 

"Edinboro has always paid for their enter- 
tainment; show that the Clarion student body 
will pay for their entertainment— top rate 
entertainment." 



Gym Dedication Tomorrow 
To Highlight Homecoming 



The long-awaited dedication of the Waldo 
S. Tippin Memorial Gymnasium-Natatorium 
will take place at 9:30 a.m. tomorrow. 

Mr. H. Ray Pope, Jr., president of the 
board of trustees at Clarion, will accept the 
building on behalf of the college. Mr. Tippin 
and President James Gemmell will both 
speak; the Reverend Dr. Eldon Somers of 
the Campus Ministry will deliver the invoca- 
tion. 

Appropriate music will be provided by the 
Clarion State College Band under the direc- 
tion of Dr. Stanley Michalski. Various elected 
and appointed state, county, and local offi- 



cials have been invited. Governor Raymond 
P. Shafer declined an invitation due to a 
previous engagement. Various friends of Mr. 
Tippin, former and present members of the 
Clarion State College faculty and board of 
trustees will be present, as well as the super- 
intendent of public instruction, a number of 
congressmen and several state representa- 
tives. 

Tours will be conducted by members of 
the Health and Physical Education Depart- 
ment preceding and following the dedication 
ceremonies which will be held in the main 

gym. 




Waldo S. Tippin Gymnasium and Natatorium 



(EDITOR'S NOTE: Many students have 
been concerned about the changes made in 
the social calendar. Tom Paolino, president 
of the Student Senate, promised to investi- 
gate this controversy in last week's Call. 
The following letter to the editor is a result 
of his efforts to answer the important ques- 
tions of the student body. 

To All Students: 

Did you ever stop to think that Dr. Elliott 
is not the person that we, the students, are 
after? Maybe he is just a scapegoat because 
we want someone to blame, and he is the 
most obvious person to blame as Dean of 
Students. 

If you were at the Student Senate meeting 
on October 2, and had listened closely to 
what Dr. Elliott was saying, you would have 
heard that he was not giving straight ans- 
wers because he did not know why the social 
functions had been canceled or changed. He 
did not know because he did not have any- 
thing to do with these social functions being 
changed. 

In last week's Clarion Call I stated that as 
President of the Student Senate, I would in- 
vestigate the matter and find out who made 
the changes and why. Well, after spending 
many hours in meetings, and in talking to 
many people I have found that it was not, 
and I repeat NOT, Dr. Elliott who made 
these changes. 

Dr. Nanovsky Appointed 

The changes came about because of three 
main factors. First, on June 1st, Dr. Nanov- 
sky was appointed as the new advisor to the 
social committee. Second, clearance for the 
use of the new gym was not given to the 
committee. Third, conflicts arose because of 
new people, new buildings, and schedules be- 
ing turned in late. 

There is only one way that this problem can 
be rectified, and that is by more students 
taking an active interest in what is going on, 
on this campus. Sure, it's easy for every 
student to sit back and bitch, but if you are 
really concerned why don't YOU, the stu- 
dents, take the initiative to go out and start 
something? A few students have already 
started, and I appreciate it. All social activi- 
ties on this campus should not be left only to 
the social committee. There are over 30 dif- 
ferent organizations on this campus that could 
easily sponsor social activities, but instead 
they are happy to sit back and have their 
own private parties. Besides that, what the 
hell do the different classes on this campus 
do? What's the matter? Are you class offic- 
ers afraid to have the students know you 
exist? 



Proposes Special Fund 

Every organization says sure they would 
like to sponsor a function, but they don't 
have the money to back it. Well, what's tlie 
matter? Are you afraid to charge admission? 
Are you afraid that the students won't sup- 
port you? Well, what's wrong with the stu- 
dent body? Does the student body really 
want social functions? If they do, why don't 
they support the functions that the social 
committee is already sponsoring? 

To help these organizations, I am presently 
proposing a special fund. This fund would be 
set up to help organizations sponsor func- 
tions. Now I would like to explain how this 
fund would be used. First, there would be 
anywhere from $5,000 to $7,000 in it. When 
an organization wants to bring in a big name 
group, they should come to the board that 
controls this money. The organization would 
tell the board what group they want to bring 
in, how much this group wants, and when and 
where they plan to have it. 

If the board feels that the affair will be a 
success, they will back the organization on 
certain conditions. If the group loses money, 
the board will only absorb one-half of the 
loss, but if the group makes money, then 
they will be asked to give 25 percent of the 
profit to the fund. This way the group has a 
backing, can only lose small amounts, and if 
they make a profit, it will help perpetuate 
the fund. This fund could also be used for 
dances or to bring in movies. 

Again I would like to remind the students 
of Clarion: If you are not satisfied with the 
way things are done on this campus, there 
is a way that you can be heard and a 
proper way to have things changed. It is not 
through demonstrations, or riots, or hanging 
people in effigy. The proper and most effec- 
tive way is to take the initiative and come 
to the Senate meetings and bring up these 
items so that they can be discussed and 
worked on in a civilized and mature, adult 
way. 

TOM PAOLINO 
President, Student Senate 



Social Committee 
Announces Dance 

The Social Committee of Stu- 
dent Senate would like to announce 
that a dance will be held at 9 o'clock 
tonight in Forest Manor. The dance 
will feature "The Entertainers" and 
an admission price of 75c will be 
charged. All students are welcome. 



Team Seeks Revenge 
For Indiana Defeat 



Edinboro State will come to Clarion's 
Homecoming tomorrow seeking revenge for 
a 58-0 humiliation at the hands of Indiana 
last week. 

The lopsided score is misleading. The Edin- 
boro squad has a traditional rivalry with 
CSC in hustle, aggressiveness and desire. 
It has a stacked lineup of sophomores and 
inexperience, but would like nothing better 
than to upset the Golden Eagle Homecoming 
and Clarion's chance to repeat as the Western 
Conference title winner. 

Quarterback Tom Mackey, a five-foot, 11- 
inch, 180-pound junior, scrambles well, can 
fire from the pocket, or throw the bomb. 
Charles Pollick at halfback is a converted 
quarterback and a replica of Mackey, less 
five pounds. He is a good rusher and tough 
competitor. Dan Bissontz, tight end, six-foot, 
one-inch, 216 pounds, is the only senior on 
the offensive lineup. Dan is looked for often 
downfield by Tom Mackey. 

Defensively, Dave Brandell, a six-foot, two- 
inch, 230-pound senior at right tackle, hits 



Class Officers 
Elected; Only 
326 Cast Ballots 

Only 326 Clarion students considered the 
elections important enough to 'devote two 
minutes of their time to vote in last week's 
election of student officers. Of the 2,912 stu- 
dents eligible to vote, only 59 seniors, 91 
juniors, 127 sophomores, and 49 freshmen 
cast their ballots. Obviously, the students 
of Clarion State College don't care who re- 
presents them. 

l^e results of the elections are as follow?: 

Senior class: Larry Cope, president; Hope 
Henry, vice president; Janice Huffman, se- 
cretary; and Tana Fairfak, treasurer. 

Junior class: Jim Ryland, president; Susan 
Patil, vice president; Ellen Blough, secre- 
tary; and Cheryl Bennett, treasurer. 

Sophomore class: Michael Bozick, presi- 
dent; Lorrie David, vice president; Lincja 
KUmkos, secretary; and Kathy Bergeson, 
treasurer. 

Freshman class: Larry Grudgen, presi- 
dent; Chuck Vogan, vice president; Mik^ll 
Yavell, secretary; and Jerry Jenkins, trea- 
surer. 



hard whenever he has the opportunity. Steve 
Hamm, a sophomore, standing six one and 
weighing 205 pounds, is another linebacker 
to watch. 

Coach Al Jacks will probably try his full- 
backs up the middle again. He may roll 
out on either side, probably, working the 
right side more because of the inexperience 
there, and keep quarterback Bob Erdeljac 
mixing his plays and running the ends. Bob 
Oberdorf. with a wrenched ankle, from the 
Lock Haven game, amy be unable to play. 
The offense will miss him at the halfback 
spot. 

Eagle Band Will Lead 
Homecoming Parade 

In tomorrow's parade, the Clarion State Col- 
lege Golden Eagle Marching Band will lead 
the Autumn Leaf Festival Parade and will 
play "America, the Beautiful" and "The Na- 
tional Emblem." 

The show during the half at the Clarion- 
Edinboro game will feature the 1968 entrance 
with fanfare and "It's ^ Big Wide Woolerful 
World." Two intricate drill routines to "I 
Got Rhythm" will be executed featuring line 
drills and floating diamonds. Next the band 
will perform a kick-down dance to "Wrap 
Your Troubles in Dreams." Concluding the 
program, the band will feature an outstand- 
ing alumnus in an intricate drill routine in 
honor of homecoming. 



Coming Events 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12 

— Football: Clarion vs. Edinboro, Home- 
coming, College Memorial Stadium, 2:00 
p.m. 

— Homecoming Dance, Chandler, 8:30 p.m. 

MONDAY, OCTOBER 14 

— Freshmen Football: Clarion vs. Califor- 
nia, away 

— Cross Country: Clarion vs. Edinboro, 
away 

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15 

—Quarterback Club Dinner, Chandler Hall, 
6:30 p.m. 

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16 

— Recital: Chapel 



IN MEMORIAM 



y/ancy y. u/escott 



Funeral services will be held today in 
Pittsburgh for Nancy J. Wescott. Mem- 
bers of her sorority. Alpha Sigma Alpha, 
will be attending the services. 

In addition, a memorial service is being 
planned for Nancy by the members of the 
sorority. The time and place will be an- 
nounced at a later date. 

Nancy, who was a junior, died early 
Tuesday morning from severe injuries af- 
ter being struck by a car Friday night, 
October 4. 

Dr. Robert Hayes, attending physician, 
reported that Miss Wescott suffered a 
fractured right elbow and right leg, in- 
ternal hemorrhaging, and also suffered a 
cardiac respiratory arrest Saturday morn- 
ing. An attempt was also made to stop 
bleeding Friday night. 

She never regained consciousness. 

Nancy, in company with her roommate, 
Linda Sherman, was returning from the 
Bull Barn on Route 322, east of Clarion, at 
11:20 p.m. They had been working on the 
Alpha Sigma Alpha float for the Home- 
coming parade on Saturday. 

The operator of the car was Edward R. 
Schimp, 44, of Strattanville. Schimp was 
traveling east on 322 and failed to see the 
girls, who were walking west towards the 
college. 

Nancy was walking in a ditch closest to 
the road when the car came off the side of 
the road and hit her on the right side. She 
was thrown into a nearby field. 

She was rushed by ambulance to Clarion 
Osteopathic Community Hospital, where 
she remained until her death. 

Born March 28, 1948, in Bristol, she was 




Nancy J, Wescott 

a daughter of James G. and Rose Marie 
Opfermor Wescott. She was a graduate of 
Peters Township High School at Canons- 
burg and was majoring in special educa- 
tion at Clarion State. 

In addition to her parents, she is sur- 
vived by two sisters, Barbara, a freshman 
at Temple University in Philadelphia, and 
Martha, 7, at home; two brothers, Mich- 
ael, 15, and Neal, 11, both at home. 

Removal was made to the Gerald Goble 
Funeral Home in Clarion and later to the 
Robert E. Wilson Funeral Home, McMur- 
ray Road, Donaldson Crossroads, Route 
19, south of Pittsburgh. 

Funeral services were conducted today 
(Friday) at St. Benedict Church in Peters 
Township, Washington County. Interment 
was in Queen of Heavens Cemetery in 
Peters Township. 



Page 2 



THE CALL — Clarion State College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



Friday, October 11, 1M8 



Editorially 
Speaking 



We Have Student Power 



students on this campus should 
realize the potential power they hold 
as members of a growing and increas- 
ingly progressive student body. Some 
undesirable conditions can be changed 
with proper organization and with uni- 
ty. 

If students unite and become in- 
volved in securing what they want and 
in the rights they feel they deserve, 
changes can be made in a satisfactory 
way. 

Many students, Jor example, com- 
plain about the food service at the cafe- 
teria, but little action resrilts from 
these complaints. If, however, the 
students were to organize a committee 
to investigate specinc problems and 
secure pertinent information to use as 
a basis for action, changes might be 
possible. 

Petitions can be distributed for 
student signatures, letters can be is- 
sued, and the Call can be used as a 
medium to express views. In other 
words, the students can apply pressure 
until they achieve their desired goals. 

Complaints are also often heard 
about sign-out procedures for women 
students. Here again is an example 
of a situation that can be changed if 
the procedure is planned and is exe- 
cuted in a proper way. Dorm regu- 
lations can also be reviseil by similar 
means. '"* 

Some questions are frequently 
raised conrcrning academic situations 
th.-^t exist on this campus. Students 
rebel about registration procedures be- 
cause they feel that they should be 



able to choose the professors they want, 
and should be able to plan the time 
schedules of their classes. Some stu- 
dents prefer all morning classes; oth- 
ers would rather have afternoon clas- 
ses. Why shouldn't classes be sched- 
uled according to personal prefer- 
ences? 

If these changes were made, stu- 
dent-faculty relations could be im- 
proved because students would have 
the teachers they want, and would 
yierefore appreciate their classes more. 
Thus a better learning situation would 
be created. Other academic problems 
would also be eliminated because the 
students would be responsible for any 
problems that would arise such as per- 
sonality conflicts and unsatisfactory 
instruction procedures. 

The current method of registra- 
tion is not permanent; it is subject to 
change. Why therefore shouldn't we 
play a part in securing these changes? 

Most aspects, m laci, of student 
life can be manipulated to student 
satisfaction. This assertion can be il- 
lustrated by the current student activi- 
ties rebellion. The students became 
involved, and as a result, there will be 
more and better social activities on 
this campus. 

Student power is relevant; it is a 
means to secure rights and to change 
outdated regulations. Don't just com- 
plain. Do something about what you 
want — the changes you create may 
make you g'ad you did. 



— C. W. 



Why Sign Out? 



The women of Clarion State Col- 
lege have in the past been subjected 
to obeying the bothersome rule -per- 
taining to signing out. This regula- 
tion has been obeyed but only with 
half-hearted approval. 

The purpose of signing out is that, 
in the case of an emergency, the y^- 
man student can be notified. tWdmen 
students are required to sign oiit at 
V p m. What if there is an emergency 
before 7 p.m.? Class schedule cards 
may help but what about the time be- 
tween classes? What would happen if 
there was an emergency on Saturday 
or Sunday aficrnoons? 

As the schedule cards are j^^i^w, 
they do not fulfill their intended p^ur- 
pose. Suppose a girl goes to meet her 
date in the lobby and asks him where 
they are going. He replies, "I don't 
know." She ultimately signs out for 
"town." How could this help in an 
emergency? As another example, a 
girl who signs out for the library meets 
some friends there, and they go to the 
diner. How would anyone find her 
there, especially since she signed out 
for the library? 

Many women students do not sign 
out for where they are going because 
some of the housemothers and some of 
the students read the cards. These 
people have no right to read them; the 
cards are there in the case of an emer- 
gency and they should be read only in 
case of an emergency. 

It may be the right of the parents 



to know what their daughter is doing, 
but this right should not be extended 
to the housemothers. The housemoth- 
ers do not fulfill any particular ser- 
vice as far as the personal life of a 
woman student is concerned. The 
Housemothers are there if a woman 
'Student wants to confide in them or 
if she wants guidance. The very prac- 
tice of the housemothers reading the 
<|ards causes many women to take il- 
' legal overnights or to sign out improp- 
©rlv. 

f Signmg out on weekdays and week- 
ttnds is ridiculous because it does not 
fccompHsh its intended purpose. If 
a woman student intends to be off 
mpus for an extended duration of 
me, she should then be required to 
^gn out, but this card should be placed 
in a locked file. This file should not 
be opened unless an emergency should 
arise. As the sign-out cards are now 
placed in the open for all to read, pri- 
vacy is at a minimum. If a woman 
student wanted everyone to know 
where she was going, with whom, and 
how she was getting there, she would 
^ost it in the daily bulletin. 

The present system of signing out 
.should be revised or done away com- 
pletely. As it exists now, the sign-out 
system is accomplishing nothing. By 
adhering to this system, we are lim- 
iting our rights to privacy and to fur- 
thering our own better judgment. 

— S. M. D. 




Letters to The Editor 



To all students: 

In the first issue of this year's Call, we 
three members of the social committee wrote 
a letter because we were concerned about 
the lack of social life on this campus. 

At that time, our major concerns were who 
made the changes and why. Numerous meet- 
ings with Dr. Elliott, Dr. Nanovsky, Dean 
Vairo, Tom Paolino, the social committee, 
and the Student Senate gave us some ans- 
wers. 

Now our major concern is where do we go 
from here. At a meeting with Dr. Elliott, Dr. 
Nanovsky, Dr. Nair and Dean Vairo, Tom 
PaoHno, Sue and Bev recommended that, 
first of all. the calendar of events be drawn 
up in February, instead of May, so students 
can resolve conflicts. 

Now in reference to the poll featured in last 
week's Call: 

Miss Zvonik, we agree that students should 
schedule events— and these students include 
ail campus organizations working with the 
social committee to plan activities for this 
campus. Discussion at the last two Senate 
meetings has led us to believe that a fund 
will be available for the sororities and fra- 
temitif^s and all other social and r^^ademic 
groups to use when they work in conjunction 
with the social committee to plan activities. 

Mr. Zener, as our first letter stated, we 
ARE concerned about the weekends when 
"there ain't nothing to do!" 

It is our hope that the social committee 
can include a few more members immedi- 
ately, and we hope concerned freshmen and 
sophomores will show an active interest in 
the social committee. 

In the next few weeks, it is our desire to 
have combos on weekends, and with the co- 
operation and support of interested fraterni- 
ties and sororities, such dances will most 
likely be scheduled immediately. If, and only 
if, students show their interest in CSC's soc- 
ial life by attending and supporting these 
combo dances, can the social committee 
work in conjunction with campus organiza- 



tions to provide students with weekends filled 

"with something to do." 

BEV BANYAY 
LINDA MASON 
SUE ALBANESI 



Editor. The Call: 

Apathetic— that's the Clarion student body. 
No spirit— that's our student body. Disinter- 
est—that's Clarion's student body, also. Ap- 
athy, lack of spirit, and disinterest— that's 
whqt^ is wrong with Clarion's student body. 

Clarion students could not care less whe- 
ther their activities schedule was changed. 
They don't have the least idea how their 
activities fees are spent or how the Student 
Senate operates. Few have figured out why 
the dining hall serves mostly carbohydrates 
or why they added the pop machine. Yet, 
two hours after supper most everyone feels 
obliged to supplement the cafeteria meal with 
one from the diner or elsewhere. I must ad- 
mit, students are less than apathetic con- 
cerning the quality of the food served in 
Chandler. Many even question the credita- 
bility of the head cook. 

It doesn't matter to the students whether 
they listen to second or eighteenth rate 
groups when they could obtain the best. 

This college is run by deans. Students take 
it for granted that the dean's authority is 
divine in nature and, therefore, not subject to 
questioning. The deans of students are the 
masters of a puppet show knovra as the Stu- 
dent S mate, and they are the dictators of an 
organization known as the CSC student body. 

Where does the student body store school 
spirit. The Big Psyche, exhibited for instance 
during the Clarion West Chester football 
game? Everyone can find the time to make 
an appearance at the Union, but what be- 
comes of that time when a pep rally is an- 
nounced? 

Students— prove me wrong: snow me that 
the student body does have a mind of its 
own and that the above statements are un- 
justified. 

DICK MEARS 



Opinion Poll 



The Clarion Call 

CALL Office, Room i, Utirroy 11 all 
Clarion State College^ Clarion^ Penna. 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Carolyn Welesko 

BUSINE.SS MANAGER ; Tom Smith 

NEWS EDITOR ^ Sandy Diesel 

FEATURE EDITOR Sue Fair 

COPY EDITOR Rosemary Slebodnik 

E.XCHANGE EDITOR Peg Foley 

CIRCULATION MANAGER Lynn Hannold 

CO-SPORTS EDITORS Gene Herritt, Gary Andres 

Advisor: Richard K. Redfern 

■ Fifrtti 
PEimSTlFAinA 
TrtirDA ( ITEVSPAPER 

ASSOCUTU)! 



I 



By ROSEMARY SLEBODNIK 

This week the question posed in our opinion 
poll was: "Would you pay to see first-class 
entertainment on our campus?"' 

Richard M. Deriso said, "I could see pay- 
ing for top entertainment such as the Temp- 
tations or the Supremes, providing that, and 
only that, the funds in the Student Senate 
entertainment account are completely ex- 
hausted through providing previous first-class 
entertainment " ' 

Though some students feel that we should 
only have to pay for entertainment if the 
Student Senate has exceeded its budget, hav- 
ing outstanding free entertainment would ne- 
cessitate limiting the audience to our students 
only, since it would be these students who 
would be paying for the groups. Rod Flick 
feels having paid entertainment would allow 
us to advertise to the public, ^rawing inter- 
ested people from the surrounding area. 

Joe Filia expressed his chagrin about our 
social situation with these words: "I am thor- 
oughly embarassed when sonteone asks me 
who is playing for our homecoming when 
all I can answer is 'The Brooklyn Bridge,' 
whoever they may be. The smaller schools 
—Grove City and St. Vincent— constantly 



have top-rate groups like the Temptations, 
Smokey, Dionne Warwick, and the Impres- 
sions. 

"The big question is, 'Why can't we?' Is 
it because we have no money? No, it's be- 
cause the 'older' people running oar Social 
Comm<ttee just don't give a damn ... I'd 
much rather pay two, three, even five dol- 
lars every time we could get a top rate 
group. Irather than throw away my $25 for 
nothing more than the Brooklyn Bridge " 

Tom Wcrthman. who has been a member 
of the Student Senate for two years, said 
that the Student Senate passed a bill last 
spring allowing an admission to be charged 
for good entertainment, yet nothing has been 
done about it. Now he, and many other stu- 
dents would Uke to know just one thing: 
"Why?" 



Wanted: Cast 

Being an election year, 1968 will 
be designated the beginning and end- 
ing of many eras. I would like to 
make an addition to this ever-growing 
list and declare this the end of the 
"suitcase college era" here at Clarion. 
However, it remains up to the students 
to prove, through their interest, in- 
volvement, and participation, that this 
declaration is indeed a true one. 

Perhaps in the past, students were 
justified in complaining that there was 
nothing tO'do on campus, packing their 
bags and fleeing to the big city for the 
weekend. But now, with the variety 
of opportunities presented, there is no 
excuse for this attitude. 

It was only through the coopera- 
tion and plain hard work of many par- 
ties that these opportunities became 
available to you. And it can only be 
through the genuine interest and in- 
volvement of the students that these 
people will be able to realize the final 
result of their labor. 

New facilities now opened or pres- 
ently being completed will provide 
students with the long-clamored for 
"pla^ to go." However, a place in 
itself can do nothing, it is merely a 
setting, a backdrop, the stage on which 
a play can make big-time or close on 



opening night. It is up to the stu- 
dents, the actors and actresses, to make 
or break it. 

Stage-center: The Waldo S. Tip- 
pin Gymnasium has probably contri- 
buted the greatest variety of opportun- 
ities in the history of this school. What- 
ever your sport — swimming or bridge, 
handball, soccer or squash, golf, table- 
tennis or touch-football, there is a pro- 
gram designed for you. 

Stage-Right: The new student un- 
ion — soon to be opened and soon to be- 
come the place to meet and greet — 
will feature pool tables, color T.V., 
card tables, carpeting, and many ex- 
tras. 

Stage-Left: Converted locker rooms 
are becoming the setting for much 
activity. One houses the busy staffs 
of the Call and the Sequelle, while the 
other, in sunlight disguised as the 
"Day Room," will soon be the scene of 
the debut of a Readers' Theatre cof- 
fee house. 

So here it is: Opening night, the 
stage is set, the light man ready, there 
is a shuffling of cue cards, a hush 
spreads through the audience, the cur- 
tain is about to rise, and the show — • 
the show is yours for the stealing. 
— Margaret Beierle 



CAMPAIGN CLARION 

Apathy run rampant; 
Elections very chancy. 
Not near as many votes 
As there were signs for Clancy. 
A. R. Grape 



Aliimnus Returns 
As Instructor 

By EUGENE WALTERS 

R. Dennis Hetrick, a 1965 graduate of Cla- 
rion State, has returned as an instructor in 
the Department of Speech Pathology and 
Audiology. Mr. Hetrick was gratified at being 
hired by his Alma Mater because he feels 
that it shows that the teachers he studied 
under have faith in his ability and feel that 
he has something worthwhile to contribute 
to his field. 

Mr. Hetrick is 28, single, and a native of 
Rimersburg, Pa. He attended Union High 
in Rimersburg, lettered in football four years, 
and was voted all-conference quarterback 
during his senior year. He comes from a 
family of athletes; his father and older bro- 
ther were also all-conference quarterbacks, 
and his younger brother is presently playing 
guard oa the Union Joint High School team. 

Boxed as a Marine 

After gra>.'uating from high school, Mr. Het- 
rick enlisted in the Marine Corps and served 
for three years. While in the Marines he 
boxed for a time as a middleweight (150 
pounds) and was undefeated. He also served 
as an admiral's guard. This is considered 
a great honor and the men serving as ad- 
miral's guards are traditionally the cream 
of the corps. 

In 1961 Mr, Hetrick enrolled at Clarion 
State. While a student he was president and 
honor member of Sigma Alpha Eta, a pro- 
fessional fraternity concerned with speech 
and hearing. He was president and a char- 
ter member of the Council for Exceptional 
Children. He was also an active member 
of Phi Sigma Pi, education's honor fraternity. 
Mr. Hetrick majored in speech and minored 
in speech correction. 

From September 1965 to January 1968, Mr. 
Hetrick studied at Purdue University in West 
Lafayette, Indiana. He wrote his thesis on 
"The Influence of Vowel Articulations on the 
Position of a Nares-Esophageal Catheter." 
This investigation proved useful in the study 
of transillumination of the larynx and the 
indirect determination of subglottal air pres- 
sure. In January 1988, Mr. Hetrick was grant- 
ed a Master of Science degree in Speech 
Pathology. 

Teaches Three Courses 

From January to June of 1968, Mr. Hetrick 
was employed by the Alfred I. duPont Spe- 
cial School District in suburban Wilmington, 
Delaware. He served as a speech pathologist 
and also participated in a federal research 
project" (Project Child) concerned with the 
early identification of learning disabilities. 

Currently Mr. Hetrick's work is keeping 
him extremely busy. He is teaching three 
courses— Education of Exceptional Children, 
Neurological Impairment, and Professional 
Practicum. In addition to his classroom dut- 
ies, Mr. Hetrick is the college supervisor 
for five student teachers in speech pathology 
and audiology. 

When asked how he felt about his present 
position Mr. Hetrick replied, "I'm quite sat- 
(isfied with my present situation and feel pro- 
fessionally stimulated by the Speech Patho- 
logy and Audiology Department. I feel my 
colleagues have made and will continue to 
make valuable contributions both to the col- 
lege and to the field of speech pathology 
and audiology. I am very happy to be a 
part of a department of this caliber.' 

Clarion to Host 
Anthropology Group 

Next Friday and Saturday the Archaeolo- 
gical Association of Clarion State College will 
host an anthropology class from the Corning, 
New York, Community College. The trip, 
which is sponsored by the Corning .Anthro- 
pology Club, will give the students an oppor- 
tunity to see the CSC club in action. 

Overnight housing is needed for the 2^ 
students and their instructor. Any person in- 
terested in hosting a student is urged to 
contact Dr. Gustav Kcmitzky. 



Becht Hall Elects 
Dormitory Officers W 

Janie Ohop was elected president of Becht 
Hall in last week's election. The vice presi- 
dent is Mary Palmer; secretary is Lynn Mor- 
row; treasurer, Diane Knapp; and referral 
board chairman is Marcia Evanko. 

This year's committee heads have also been 
chosen. They are: fire, health, and safety, 
Michele McCafferty; budget chairman, Cay 
Weldon; public relations, Elizabeth Curley; 
social affairs, Louise Muzyka; hospitality, 
Chris Hayes; house management, Carol Wiu- 
kleman; food and dining services, Mary 
Burke; women's athletic representative, Ka- 
thy Peterson. 

Mrs. Robinson, after suffering an accident 
at Forest Manor, has returned to Becht Hall, 
joining the head resident, Mrs. Thompson. 

Math Department 
Offering Film Series 

A weekly film series is currently being 
offered to Clarion students by the Mathema- 
tics Department. 

These films are shown every Tuesday eve- 
ning in Peirce Science Center. Although these 
films are shown especially for elementary 
and secondary mathematics majors, any in- 
terested student or faculty is welcome. 

There are two film series provided by the 
Madison Project Mathematics Films and the 
Mathematics Association of America. The 
Madison Project shows an actual elementary 
school class dealing with the newer mathe- 
matics concepts, with classes conducted by 
Dr. Robert Davis of Syracuse University and 
Webster College. The second series deals 
with more advanced topics. 

Some of the recent showings included 
"Three Faces of Mathematics," "Matrices," 
and "Complex Number.-, Via Matrices." On 
Tuesday, October 15, the Mathematics De- 
partment will be showing "Open Sentences 
and the Number Line" and "Introduction to 
Postman Stories." Time listing will be in 
the daily bulletin. 



A.F.L. opened its 70-game schedule Sep- 
tember 6. 



Student agitation m Italy continues una- 
bated. 







Friday, October 11, 1968 



THE CALL 



Clarion Stfett College, Clarion, Penn sylvania 

f t. ^ ^ 



Pa««f 



Bechf Hall Sophomore 
Spent Year in Sweden 



By JERRILYN JONES 

Most American students are intrigued by 
Sweden. Much has been printed about Swed- 
ish "lack of morality" and odd Swedish cus- 
toms. But how much do we as Americans 
know about the Swedes besides the fact that 
their country is the economic leader of Eur- 
ope? 

Larilyn Andre, a resident of Chicora, Pa., 
qnd a sophomore at Clarion, can provide 
us with some answers. Larilyn is an English 
Biajor here and lives in Becht Hall. In the 
summer of 1966, Larilyn went to Sweden 
as part of the American Field Service's stu- 
dent exchange plan. She spent a httle over 
a year there, returning in August 1967, in 
time to come to Clarion. 

Stayed in Baden 

Larilyn traveled extensively in Sweden. 
Some of the places she visited were Norrbo- 
ten (in northern Sweden), Lapland, Skane, 
Stockholm, and the North Sea. Most of the 
time, however, she stayed at Boden, the main 
military and hospital center of northern Swe- 
den. Boden is located 10 miles inside the 
Arctic circle, and it took awhile for Larilyn 
to accustom herself to the long periods of 
dark and daylight. 

Did it take Larilyn long to adjust to life 
in Sweden? She says about three months— 
the time given her to learn the Swedish lan- 
guage. "I tried not to be a tourist; I tried 
to get inside the Swedish culture and way 
of life." It took a while, Larilyn claims, 
to get used to eating purposely rotted fish 
and food with blood in it. She also accus- 
tomed herself to drinking wine with meals. 
The Swedish attitude towards children took 
• while to get used to; children are treated 
as adults once they graduate from elemen- 
tary school. 

Like Pop Music 

Larilyn believes that there are several sim- 
ilarities between Swedish students and their 
American counterparts. "They are both hunt- 
ing for happiness in life." Swedish students, 
according to Larilyn, like pop music but don't 
restrict themselves to the American brand. 
Their favorite group is the Beach Boys. 

The differences between American and 
Swedish students are more pronounced. Swed- 
ish students, says Larilyn, know more about 
world affairs. They shov; hardly any social 
bias and are open-minded about life, especial- 
ly sex. To the typical young Swede, sex it 
not a subject to be talked about behind closed 
doors. Parents do not frown or disinherit 
their daughter when she goes to a special 
lodge to spend a week or two with the boy 
she plans to marry; her action is logical 




LARILYN ANDRE 

for such a period tests the compatibility of 
the couple. 

Enjoyed Her Stay 

What impressions do the Swedes have of 
Americans? They're not flattering. Larilyn 
stated that most Swedes believe American 
students are narrow-minded and prejudiced: 
"They say we don't understand ourselves." 
Swedish opinion is that Americans are phy- 
sically lazy and that we don't get enough 
fresh air. Swedish advice to Americans: Slow 
down. Think. Enjoy life. 

When asked if she enjoyed her stay, Larilyn 
responded with an emphatic "Yes!" Her 
main reason was that in Sweden she was 
given a chance to better understand herself 
and others. She found a tranquility there 
thJit she believes is lacking in American life. 
She enjoyed the country, especially the tun- 
dra where she spent most of her vacation. 
Most of all she enjoyed the sports: "Every- 
one there is engaged in some sport . . . ski- 
ing, bicycling and even birdwatching." 

Larilyn was greatly impressed by Sweden 
and its people. She plans to return to Sweden 
after graduation to teach English. 



Members Selected for 
New Concert Season 



Edward Roncone, assistant professor of 
music and conductor of the Clarion State 
College Symphony Orchestra, announced this 
week the forty-three instrumentalists who will 
play in the orchestra's 1968-1969 concert sea- 
son: 

Violins: David Mallory, concertmaster; 
Lynne Mason, Nicolas Rutherford, Sally Hil- 
lard, Sherley Allison, Joyce Fisher, Beverly 
Rhoades, George Barber, Francis Greco, 
Bong Hi Kim, Orrie Boring. 

Viola: Barbara Hardin. 

Cellos: Vahe Berberian, principal; John 
Heyser, Barbara Douglass, Chai Kim. 

String Bass: Roger Horn. 

Flutes: Linda Harriger, Karen Grinder. 

Oboes: Richard Abel, Lillian Pfaff, Carolyn 
Harpster. 

Clarinets: Christian Bohlen, principal; Ken- 
neth Show, James McKelvey. 

Bassoons: Judy Stoneburner, Judy Wagner. 

Piano: Annette Roussel-Pesche. 

French Horns: Burton Hardin, principal; 
James Kypta, Linda Bogovich, Nancy Young, 
Janet Crawford. 

Trumpets: David Weible, Ronald Dehner, 
Claus Oglesby. 

Trombones: Richard Darg, Dennis Steiner, 
David McElheny, Charles Siegal. 

Tuba: Ronald Allaman. 
' Tympani: Joan Douglass. 

Percussion: William Lee. 

The orchestra is composed of twenty-six 
students, seven individuals from the commun- 
ity, and ten faculty members— six of whom 
are members of the music department. 

Mr. Roncone has been active with the re- 
cruitment of personnel since early summer, 
and the orchestra has been in rehearsal since 
the beginning of the academic year, meeting 
every Tuesday evening from 7 to 10 p.m. 

The orchestra will present three concerts 
during this season. The first will be held on 
Wednesday, November 6. It will feature three 
student soloists: Lynne Mason and Nicolas 
Rutherford, violin; and Jeanne Matlack, pi- 
ano. The second concert will be on Monday, 
December 16, together with the Clarion State 
College Concert Choir, under the direction of 
William McDonald. This program will consist 
<rf the performance of J. S. Bach's Cantata 
Lobet Gott and Luigi Cherubini's Requiem 
Mass in C minor. 



STUDENT CEI^TTER OPENING DELAYED 

The Student Center, which was lo have 
been officially opened tomorrow, will not be 
^en for at least a month. Dr. Jfhn Nanov- 
sky, director of the center, said this week 
that pool tables and c^er furniture have not 
yet arrived. 



The final concert will be held on Friday, 
April 1,8, 1969, featuring a program which 
will be of special appeal to the young at 
heart. 

Fantasy Writers 
Hold Workshop 

From June 24 to August 2 last summer 
a writers' workshop in science fiction and 
fantasy was held in Clarion. 

The workshop, directed by Dr. Robin Scott 
Wilson, professor of English on the Clarion 
faculty, was open to everyone of college 
age or above. The copyrights to three of 
the stories produced in this workshop were 
sold. One story will appear in the work Orbit 
5, and the other two will appear in the work 
entitled Again Dangerous Vision. 

The visiting staff at the Clarion workshop 
were Judith Merril. Fritz Leiber, Harlan El- 
lison. Damon Knight, and Kate Wilhelm. Jud- 
ith Merril has been a writer and an editor 
for 20 years. Fritz Leiber has been writing 
fiction for 30 years. His novel Conjecture Wife 
has been twice made into a movie. The es- 
sential idea for the television series "Be- 
witched " came from Leibers novel. Harlan 
Ellison has written 500 short stories and 17 
novels. Many of his short stories have ap- 
peared in Playboy. Mr. Ellison has also writ- 
ten scripts for the television series "Man 
From Uncle," "Star Trek," "Twilight Zone," 
and several others. Damon Knight, a fore- 
most critic in speculative fiction, and his 
wife, Kate Wilhelm, conduct the annual Mil- 
ford Writers Convention. 

This type of workshop was unique since 
it was the first one ever held in this country 
or in the world. There were 25 participants; 
the personalities of these participants is per- 
haps the most interesting facet of the work- 
shop. Their ages ranged from 18 to 64 years. 
The professions represented included a re- 
tired surgeon, college students both graduate 
and undergraduate, housewives, teachers, a 
computer programmer, two journalists, and 
a research plant pathologist. Dr. C. Davis 
Belcher, the retired surgeon, wrote a 12,000 
word novelette on the foreseeable legal pro- 
blems of organ transplants. This work will 
appear in Damon Knight's forthcoming col- 
lection of short stories, Orbit 5. This novelette 
is also being considered for television. 

Dr. Wilson is planning on holding this work- 
shop again this coming .summer. Dr. Wilson's 
mo.st recent story, "A Chair of Comparative 
Leisure," will appear in the forthcoming issue 
of Amalog. 



A PEEK AT GREEKS 



BELLS 

James Stockdill to Donna Stuart, AJpba 
Sigma Tau. 



DELTA ZETA 

Pink roses go to Susie DeRiggi, who has 
been chosen Theta Xi Homecoming Queen. 

Leona Acquaviva and Debbie Lewis have 
become den mothers for the Cub Scout troop 
in Clarion. 

Congratulations to Lorrie David and Lyn 
Klimkos, two of our sisters who were recently 
elected vice-president and secretary, respec- 
tively, of the sophomore class. 

ZETA TAU ALPHA 

The Zetas extend tlieir deepest sympathies 
to the sisters of Alpha Sigma Alpha for the 
loss of their sister, Nancy Wescott. 

A belated congratulations to Chris Nevel on 
making the Dean's List. 

White violets go out to Ruth Anne Swartz- 
welder for her engagement to Ralph J. Papa. 

Our float is nearing completion, and with 
great anticipation we look forward to Home- 
coming. 

ALPHA SIGMA TAU 

Alpha Sigma Tau is busy with the last-min- 
ute touches to complete our float. 

Yellow roses go out to Maureen Super on 
her recent pinning to Jim Serafin. 

SIGMA TAU GAMMA 

The brothers of Sigma Tau Gamma would, 
like to extend a belated "welcome" to the 
returning students of Clarion State College, 
and especially to the Class of 1972. We wish 
everyone a happy and successful year. Also, 
we extend a special thanks to the women 
who helped in the construction of the Sigma 
Tau Gamma Homecoming float. We appreci- 
ate your efforts very much. ^ 

This year, the Sig Tau house has seven 
men who represent us on the football field. 
They are: Fran Sirianni, Art Tragesser, Ed 
Tappe, Paul McDowell, Bob Cunningham, 
Larry Morris, and none other than the mdn 
who gets those interceptions when they count, 
our Rich Eddie. A sincere congratulations 
goes out to Brother Fred Wickstrom for" his 
fine performance during the Geneva game, 
which gave him a share of the title as player 
of the week. 



i 



The Sig Taus increased their ranks by 
seven pounds, two ounces, as Bill Laughlin 
came through with a winner. Congratulations, 
Bill. 

THETA XI 

The brothers of Theta Xi are diligently 
working on their float for the Homecoming 
Parade this year. Word has it the brothers 
are reserving two spaces on their mantle 
for the trophies. 

Congratulations go out to Sue DeRiggi, our 
Homecoming Queen, and Lynn Meyers, the 
Theta Xi Sweetheart. 

The brothers wish to extend their deepest 
sympathy to the sisters of Alpha Sigma Al- 
pha on the recent loss of their sister, Nancy 
Wescott. 

We would also like to send out a special 
thanks to the girls who spent many long and 
cold hours helping us with our float. 

TAU KAPPA EPSILON 

We would Uke to extend congratulations 
to brother Larry Cope who was elected senior 
class president. 

We are proud to announce our sweetheart 
for the 1968-69 year, Vicki Wilcox, Delta Zcta. 
Congratulations Vicki. 

The officers this year are: Gary Wilsher, 
president; Ken Edwards, vice president; Ron 
De Woody, secretary; Ralph Preffer, treasur- 
er; Jack Moravetz, sergeant-at-arms; Pete 
DeLuco, historian; Tom Elverson, social 
chairman. 



Mathematics Club 
Will Present Program 

On Wednesday the Mathematics CJlub will 
present a program in the planetarium lecture 
hall in Peirce Sq^ence Center at 7:30 p.m. 

The program, "Sets and the Singleton 
Mathematician," will consist of mini-lectures 
by some of the mathematics professors. 



MODERN DINER 

Where Friends Meet to Eat 

Enjoy Life . . . Eat Out Here Often 
We Are Always Open r 

We Cater lo the Family Children Are Always Welcome 



Gather's Health and Beauty Aids 



MAIN STREET 



CLARION 



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TOOTH BRUSH 

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Instamatic Kodaks 

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Pins, Rings and Bells 

PINS 

Jim Serafin, Tau Kappa Epsilon, to Mau- 
reen Super, Alpha Sigma Tau. 

Glenn Smith, Alpha Chi Rho, to Martha 
Condriet, Penn State. 

Dan Gilbert, Alpha Chi Rho, to Leafy Mc- 
Millen, Indiana University. 

Harvey Hull, Alpha Chi Rho, to Sandie 
Merten, Alpha Sigma Alpha. 

RINGS 

Russ Graeff, Alpha Chi Rho, to Connie 
Ireland, CSC. 

Private Bill Kimball to Pam Comich, CSC. 

Ralph Papa, Pcnn State, to Ruth Anne 
Swartzwelder, Zeta Tau Alpha. 

Robert Nixon, Sigma Tau Gamma, '66, to 
Nancy Henderson, CSC. 



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THE CALL — Clarion State College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



Friday, October 11, 1968 



BATTLE OF EAGLES 



Berberian to Present Cello 



Golden Eagles Scalp Recital Wednesday in Chapel 

Bald Eagles, 14-3 



The Clarion defense hung tough Saturday, 
October 5, as the Golden Eagles romped over 
the Lock Haven Bald Eagles, 14-3, in a night 
contest for their first win of the season in 
the PSCAC conference. 

Taking the ball to the Clarion 12 on the 
third play of the game, Lock Haven drew 
first blood on a field goal by Huntzinger. 

All the rest of the scoring came in the 
second quarter as Bill Wise accounted for 
two TD's. In the first case, the Etna full- 
back crashed over from the five after the 
Jacksmen had sustained a 72-yard drive from 
their own 28. In the second instance, Lock 
Haven punted to the Clarion 46, and Bob 
Oberdorf ran it back to the l.<K:k Haven 
26. Wise then plunged over from the nine- 
yard line on a 17-yard pass from Bob Erdel- 
Jac. 

Tightness of the Golden Eagle defense was 
evident as the Clarion squad gave up only 
35 yards rushing and 136 yards passing to 
the Bald Eagles. Clarion intercepted two pas- 
ses, one by Fran Sirianni and one by Art 



Tragesser, after Lock Haven's deepest pene- 
tration of the day to the six-yard line. 

What looked at first glance like the play 
of the evening came in the third period as 
Art Triveri recovered a fumble on the Cla- 
rion 18 and ran 82 yards for naught as the 
play was called back due to the college rule 
prohibiting running with a fumble. 

Jim Becker made four catches for 71 yards 
before going out via the injury route. Larry 
McNulty had four for 60, and Rick Terza 
had three for 33. Bill Wise rushed 29 times 
for 109 yards, Jim Kocan rushed nine for 
32 and Mike Giunta, recapturing his old 1967 
form, made five for 22. 

Standouts in the contest which gave Clarion 
a 3-1 record for the season thus far, werel 
Jim Jones, Art Triveri, Fran Sirianni, Elmer 
S^huetz, and Art Tragesser. 

The Golden Eagles are looking ahead with 
somewhat more confidence to tomorrow's 
Homecoming game with Edinboro, particular- 
ly after the 58-0 drubbing taken by the Fight- 
ing Scots last weekend at the hands of In- 
diana. 



As I See It . . . 



By GARY ANDRES 

Football players are a special breed of 
men. They heal faster and bleed less than 
most people. 

Clarion came back with a 14-3 victory over 
the Bald Eagles of Lock Haven. In the first 
quarter. Clarion had to give up the football 
on the Lock Haven 42-yard line, when the 
Bald Eagle linemen blitzed CSC quarterback, 
Bob Erdeljac. Quarterback Denny Rhule and 
end Tim Ryan moved the ball to the Clarion 
eight-yard line. 

The Clarion defense never gave an inch. 
In three attempts, the Clarion defense took 
back four yards from Lock Haven. The wall 
stood and forced Craig Huntzinger and the 
JLock Haven squad to settle for a field goal. 
Lock Haven three, and Clarion zero. 

Andy Brindger moved the kickoff from the 
18 to the 28-yard line of Clarion. A 22-yard 
pass to Larry McNulty brought the ball in 
on the Lock Haven 43-yard line. With 14:22 
left in the second quarter, 6ill Wise, on brute 
power, bulled into the end zone from five 
yards out. John Dorish booted the point. CSC 
seven. Lock Haven three. 

Three and a half minute« later, Clarion 
added its second tally. A poor punt and look- 
in pass to Larry McNulty put the ball on 
the Lock Haven nine-yard line in two plays. 
Bill Wise at fullback drove it in for the 
touchdown. Iron Toe kicked his seventh ex- 
tra point of the season without a miss, to 
make it CSC 14, Lock Haven 3. 

The 14 points proved to be all the Clarion 
offense was going to get, and the three for 
Lock Haven, all the Clarion defense was go- 
ing to give, but neither conclusion was ob- 
vious until the final gun. 

Jim Becker had to leave the game before 
the close of the first half. He was slammed 
by a Lock Haven pass defender breaking 
up Clarion's 12 to 20 combination. 

In the second half, in the chill autumn 
air, the defense of both teams locked horns. 
Despite this being Clarion's first night game, 
neither team could find any daylight in the 
opposing team's line. Lock Haven wa$ given 
a break when a fumbled punt gave them 
the ball on Clarion's own 41-yard line. The 
drive carried 35 yards to the CSC six-^ard 
line. On the first and goal situation, Fran 
Sirianni of CSC intercepted a pass in the 
Bald Eagle endzone. The breaks canceled 
each other out and Lock Haven defense was 
improved from the first half. 

With 13:14 left in the fourth quarter, Art 
Triveri of Clarion romped downfield amidst 
dazed Lock Haven tacklers. The touchdown 
was called back because the Lock Haven 
fumble was ruled a dead ball. 

The fourth quarter ended after Lock Haven 
and Clarion defense took turns mauling each 
other's offense. Gang tackling, scrambling, 
and muscle football kept the final period 
in suspense. 

The ability to score and stop the other 
team from doing the same wins football 
games. It was never quite so apparent as 
In the Lock Haven game. A Clarion defense 
led by Jim Jones, Rich Smith, Rich McWil- 
liams, and Art Tragesser selfishly allotted 
hoclt Haven rushing, nine yards the first 
half, and a total rushing offense of 35 yards! 

The whole team, a total team effort, com- 



bined in a solid unit to win. Coach Al Jacks 
said, "It was Clarion's toughest game this 
season." 

GAME STATISTICS 

CSC Lock Haven 

9 First Downs Rushing 2 

8 First Downs Passing 8 

First Downs Penalties 1 

17 Total First Downs 11 

187 Net Yards Rushing 35 

159 Yards Gained Passing 126 

22-11 Passes Attempted & Completed 30-14 

346 Total Offense 162 

14 Score 3 

Plaver of the Week 

Jim Jones has been named player of the 
week by Coach Al Jacks for his performance 
last Saturday night in the game against Lock 
Haven. 

Jim, a senior defensive tackle from La- 
trobe, stands six foot one-inch and weighs 
223 pounds; he shares the honor of co-cap- 
tain with another defensive tackle, Bob Ge- 
vaudan. 

Jim played football as a freshman and 
earned his starting position as a sophomore. 
Since then, Jim has become an integral part 
of the Clarion defense. He was a member 
of the 1966 state championship team and 
last year's Western Conference champions. 
If the Eagle defense can continue to hold 
its opponents to 35 yards as it did against 
Lock Haven, Jim Jones may play in yet 
another state championship game. 

In citing Jones, Coach Jacks said that Jim 
played "a real tough game" and that the 
coaching staff felt "he was an inspiration 
to the Eagles in helping them defeat a real 
good Lock Haven team." 



GARBY THEATRE 

NOW SHOWING 

"Guess Who's Coming To Dinner" 

SAT. & SUN. MATINEE 
"TINDERBOX" 

SUN. 13th — TUE. 15th 
"PETULIA" 

STARTS WED. 
"RACHEL RACHEL" 



ORPHEUM THEATRE 

NOW SHOWING 

•'SECRET LIFE OF THE 

AMERICAN WIFE" 

SUN. 13th to TUE. 15th 
"DEADFALL" 



WED. BARGAIN SHOW 
"THE PARTY" 



STARTS THURSDAY 17th 

"NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD" 

and "DR. WHO" 



EMERSON DRIVE-IN 

Dining Room and Take Out 

FEATURING 

ASTRONAUTS SUBMARINES 

BASKET DINNERS STEAKS 

25c Car Wash In Rear 



OPEN FROM 6 A. M. TO 12 MIDNIGHTS 
2 MINIJTES EAST OF THE COLLEGE 



Vahe Berberian, associate professor of mu- 
sic at Clarion State, will present a cello 
recital at 8 p.m. Wednesday in the College 
Chapel. The public is cordially invited to 
attend this event. 

The program for this recital will be Bach's 
Sonata No. 1 in D major; Mendelssohn's Son- 
ata No. 1 in B flat major, opus 45; and 
Brahm's Sonata No. 2 in F major, opus 99. 

Mr. Berberian holds the diploma of music 
in violoncello from the Lebanese Academy 
of Fine Arts in Beirut, Lebanon, where he 
was a student of Nicolas Dale. After gradua- 
tion, Mr. Berberian pursued further musical 
training at the Benedetto Marcello Conserva- 
tory of Music in Venice, Italy, and the Moz- 
arteums International Summer Academy in 
Salzburg, Austria. This was followed by two 
years of private cello studies with Enrico 
Mainardi in Rome, Italy. 

At the present time, he is a doctoral candi- 
date in performance at Indiana University, 
Bloomington, Indiana, where he has studied 
with Fritz Magg. Mr. Berberian has received 
grants from the Italian Government, the Leb 
anese Government and the Calouste Gulben 
kian Foundation of Lisbon, Portugal. He has 
taught at the National Conservatory of Music, 
Beirut, Lebanon, and at the Lamar State 
College of Technology, Beaumont, Texas, be- 
fore coming to Clarion State College. 




Naval Team Will 
Visit Campus Moii. 

On Monday a naval aviatioh officer infor- 
mation team from the Naval Air Station 
at \VillQw Grove, Pa., will be here at Clarion 
State. This team will counsel male college 
students on the opportunities as a naval avia- 
tion officer. 

. Seoidlll can qualify for pilot, flight officer, 
/f or air Intelligence officer. Students are en- 



couraged to inquire into these programs dur- 
ing their junior year. 

Second semester sophomores and juniors 
can apply for summer training programs 
which lead to a commission and flight train- 
ing. These summer programs are a part 
of aviation reserve officer candidate training. 

Interested students should look for the team 
in the hall outside the placement office in 
the administration building. 



One out of five meter readers in the U.S. 
i3 bitten by a dog at least once a year. 



^ 



o (2) World Series, Team Autographed Baseballs 

from the members of 

The Detroit Tigers and The St. Louis Cardinals 

FUNDS FOR STUDENT COUNCIL FOR EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN 

DONATION — $1.00 

Winners Announced October 23, 1968 

Contact Any Special Education Major or Mr. L. D. Sauvage 

Special Education Building, Rm. 4 



VAHE BERBERIAN 



New Building Planned; 
Clarion State is Expanding 



This year's Homecoming gives most alumni 
and visitors to Clarion State their first op- 
portunity to see the newly completed Waldo 
S. Tippin Gymnasium and Natatorium as well 
as the Donald D. Peirce Science Center, 
which was opened last January. 

It is evident that the once-a-year visitor 
to campus should be impressed by Clarion's 
rapidly expanding campus. But what lies 
ahead for future homecomings? A talk with 
Dr. David Hilton, assistant to the president, 
provides some of the answers. 

By next year. Homecoming of 1969, there 
should be three more new buildings open 
for use. The first will be the newly renovated 
Davis Hall, which will house the communica- 
tions division on campus plus an FM radio 
station. 

New Administration Building 

The second will be the new Administration 
Building at the corner of Ninth and Main 
streets which will house offices of the pre- 
sident, his assistants and several deans. 

The third and largest new building next 
year will be the Fine Arts Center. It will 
contain two theaters with a total seating cap- 
acity of nearly 2,000 persons. But this is 
only the beginning. 

Two years from now, at the 1970 Home- 



coming, visitors will be greeted by five new 
buildings. One will be the newly completed 
first phase of the Library addition; it will 
consist of the first four stories of the even- 
tual nine-story library tower. 

Two other new structures will be the seven- 
story dormitories now being started on Main 
Street near McKean Hall; each of these will 
have a capacity to house 450 students. 

I Health Center Planned 

The two other buildings that year will be 
the Health Center and the first phase of 
the Student Center. The Health Center will 
provide an infirmary and an out-patient clin- 
ic, while the first phase of the Student Center 
will provide a snack bar and lounge area. 
Also during Homecoming, 1970, visitors will 
be able to view a grassy plain where Becht 
Hall and Old Music Hall now stand. 

These are the buildings which are being 
constructed or are near construction. There 
are more in the hands of the architects and 
the same number approved, but not placed. 
So. as you return year after year for Home- 
coming, keep your eyes open, there will be 
more and more each year for you to see. 



East Germans bar Berlin Mayor from auto- 
bahn. 



CHANEL 

N05 SPRAY COLOGNE 



NOW REFILLABLE 




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522 MAIN ST. 



$6.00 Plus Tax 
REFILL $4.00 Plus Tax 

A PLEASURE TO GIVE 
-A TREASURE TO OWN 

GALLAGHER DRUGS 

Telephone 226-7100 



CLARION, PA. 




Miss America- Shoes 

By SMARTAIRE, 



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LINED FOR 

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fashion casuals 

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continental 

flair 




ALSO 
IN MEN'S 
STYLES 



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TO 10 




by DURHAM'S 



Youil step beautifully along' 

the fashion beat in Capers, 

with their well-rounded 

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with deep coordinate color 

tones. Magnificent examples of 

foot-flattery that will get you everywhere! 



Hop, skip and romp-away in Miss America's' 
ankle boot. In traditional dirty buck. Fab 
with your favorite pantsuit. 
You Saw them on TV's AMERICAN BANDSTAND 



CROOKS SHOES 



MAIN STREET 



CLARION, PA. 



Prexy Crowns Queen 




BARBARA DIMMERLING, CSC Homecoming Queen, is crowned 
by President Gemmell. 



Trophies Are Presented 
For Outstanding Floats 



At the Annua! Autumn Leaf Festival Par- 
ade last Saturday, trophies were presented 
for outstanding floats. 

Theme of this year's parade was "Am- 
erica the Beautiful" and Clarion State Col- 
lege was well represented in the parade 
through the efforts of its sororities, frater- 
nities, and other college organizations, who 
created some magnificently colorful and ori- 
ginal floats. 

Among the sororities, prizes went to Delta 
Zeta, first place; Sigma, Sigma, Sigma, se- 
cond place; and third place to Zeta Tau 
Alpha. The sisters of Delta Zeta won with 
a "Horn of Plenty" overflowing with colorful 
fruit. The Tri Sigs had for their theme, 
"America— Dreams to Reality." The theme 
was represented by a water wheel and scen- 
ery as seen in the dreams of a small boy. 
Last year, Tri Sigma sorority won first prize 
Alphas* origmal fioat was entitled ''America 
— God's Crucible." It pictured a melting pot 
supported by hands of all races. 



by DIANNA CHERRY 

In the fraternity division, the Theta Zi's 



won first place with their float "The Beauty 
of Liberty", complete with a flaming statue 
of liberty. Phi Sigma Epsilon took second 
place with "Keep America Beautiful." It fea- 
tured a car on a map with the driver litter- 
ing the highways. Sigma Tau Gamma placed 
third with "You Make America Beautiful," 
a series of mirrors arranged interestingly 
under a rotating Uncle Sam. 

In the dependent category, Venango Cam- 
pus placed first with "Stamp out Litter Bugs" 
depicting a huge foot stamping out a litter- 
bug. Jefferson and McKean Halls were second 
with "America Welcomes a Short Way to 
Beauty." They pictured a huge autumn leaf 
and a highway with Uncle Sam and the CSC 
eagle at the front of the float. The Day 
Students were third with the Santa Maria in 
honor of Columbus Day. 

Best float of the parade went to the Lions 
Club of Clarion. 



OPINION POLL 



By Rosemary Slebodnik 

This week a poll was taken among 100 
of our college women. The question posed 
to them was: "Are you for or against the 
present sign-out system?" The result of the 
poll was 86 percent against the present sys- 
tem, nine percent for it, and five who chose 
to remain non-committed. 

Some of the girls were then asked to com- 
ment upon the present system. Here are some 
of their individual replies: 

Sue Flood— "I don't think it serves its pur- 
pose, because girls take it too much for 
granted that you can sign out for anywhere, 
as long as you sign out. I feel if your par- 
ents give you permission to go anywhere, 
th sign-out system should be used only in 
the case of an emergency, and since it does- 
n't work for this purpose, it should be 
changed to a more permissive system." 

Lynn Mason— "I dont like it. The problem 
is that it's hard to say where you're going 
to be. If you want to go three or five places, 
how can you sign out for all those places? 
Actually, its ^n invasion of privacy." 

Marilyn Reber — "I think it's too much fuss. 
It's none of anyone's business where we go 
or with whom." 

Nancy Henderson— "The sign-out system is 
a necessary thing, but here it is, for all 
purposes, worthless. Since most weekend so- 
cial events are illegal, what girl would sign 
out legally, when all the housemother has 
to do is check her card to find that there 
is an illegal party? 

"Maybe the dorms could be operated like 
apartment houses, eliminating sign-outs, and 
placing all responsibility on each girl. Maybe 
we could put a 'senior dorm' into operation 
which would have different hours, or a dif- 
ferent sign-out system than other dorms." 

Pat Dobson— "I think it's useless and a 
waste of time to sign out. I feel this way 
because when signing out, you may have no 
idea where you're going, thus they cannot 
find you in an emergency, anyway. I'd re- 
commend that the system be done away with 
completely." 

Debbie McKelvey — "I think it's necessary 
to have in case of an emergency, but I 
know it's not being used right. I think it 
would be sufficient to say with whom you 
are going out." 

Dodie Fleming— "Since we have certain 
hours, we should be expected to sign in and 
out. But nobody has to know where you are 
going, and whom you are going with, as long 
as you come in on time." 

Dee Menozza — "I don't think it's anybody's 
business where we go. I think it would 
be a good idea to turn the sign-out books 



in to the housemother, so that the boys are 
not able to read them." 

Most women students merely amplify what 
these women have already said. It is the 
consensus that sign-outs are almost unnec- 
essary and an invasion of privacy. CSC wo- 
men are bearing with the obsolete system 
while waiting and hoping for something 
much better. 

Tomorrow's Concert 
To Feature McCoys 

The Social Committee is proud to announce 
that the "fabulous," "marvelous," and "su- 
preme" McCoys will be appearing in concert 
Saturday, October 19, in the Waldo S. Tippin 
Gymnasium, from 9 to 12 p.m. There will 
be no admission fee charged for this event. 
The McCoys are remembered for their rendi- 
tion of that all time favorite, "Hang on 
Sloopy." This concert will be highlighting 
the month of October. The Symbols, another 
great group, will be appearing along with the 
McCoys. All students are urged to attend. 



Calendar of 
Coming Events 



OCTOBER 18 

—Dance: "New Hudson Exit," Chandler 
Hall, 9 p.m. 

OCTOBER 19 

—Football: Clarion vs. Indiana, College 

Memorial Stadium. 1:30 p.m. 
—Cross Country: N. A. I. A. at Gannon 
— S. P. S. E. A. Conference: Qarion 
—Concert: "McCoys," Gym, 8:30 p.m. 

OCTOBER 20 

—Movie: "Robin and the Seven Hoods," 
Chapel, 8 p.m. 

OCTOBER 22 

—Quarterback Club Dinner: Chandler Hall, 
6:30 p.m. 

OCTOBER 23 

—Cross Country: Clarion, Indiana, Carneg- 
ie-Mellon, at Indiana 





Vol. 40, No. 4 



CLARION STATE COLLEGE — CLARION, PENNSYLVANIA 



Friday, October 18, 1968 



Homecoming Is A Success; Former Penn State Professor 



Tippin Gym Is Dedicated 



Sunny autumn skies set the mood for the 
past weekend as hundreds of alumni and 
students turned out for the 1968 Homecoming 
events at Clarion State College. 

Beginning Friday night, October 11, a pep 
rally was held in the parking lot near Chand- 
ler Hall; later that evening the social com- 
mittee of the Student Senate sjwnsored a 
dance featuring the "Entertainers" at Forest 
Manor. 

The scene Saturday morning was centered 
around the dedication of the new Waldo S. 
Tippin Gymnasium-Natatorium. Attended by 
alumni, faculty, students, and honored guests 
from state agencies and political life, the 
ceremony and the college honored Waldo S. 
Tippin, for 31 years Clarion State's athletic 
director and now living in retirement near 
Clarion, by dedicating its new spacious $2.5 
million gymnasium-natatorium to him. 

Tippin Tribute Paid 

During the ceremony, Robert E. Lenker, 
executive assistant. General State Authority, 
gave H. Ray Pope, Jr., vice president of 
the Board of Trustees, a symbo'ic key in 
presenting the building to the college. In 
his acceptance remarks, Mr. Pope paid tri- 
bute to Mr. Tippin and gave him the in- 
scribed key, saying: "He (Tippin) has the 
ability to pass on to others the character- 
istics of his life which made it so full and 
abundant." 

In response, Mr. Tippin reminisced on the 
experiences and associations of his athletic 
career and envisioned the full use of the 
new facility in providing a greatly-expanded 
athletic program at Clarion. He expressed 
deep appreciation for himself and his family 
to college officials, alumni, and students for 
the honor bestowed in giving the building his 
name. 

Distinguished guests introduced by Dr. 
James Gemmell, Clarion State's president, 
were the Honorable Grace M. Sloan, Pennsyl- 
vania Auditor-General; state senator and 
Mrs. Albert R. Pechan; state representatives 
George W. Alexander and Alvin Kahle; Cla- 
rion County Commission C. Brady Weaver, 
and Darl Callen, special assistant to the Aud- 
itor General and former business manager 
at Clarion State. 

Board of Trustees members recognized 
were Chester Byerly and Mrs. Byerly, New 
Bethlehem; H. Carl Wasson, Franklin. Dr. 
Philip W. Silviss, Tionesta; H. Ray Pope, 
Jr. and Mrs. Pope, Clarion; E. Clinton Stitt, 



Kittanning; and Mrs. WiUiam C. Hearst and 
Mr. Hearst, Clarion. 

Family Attends 

Also introduced were Mr. and Mrs. Waldo 
S. Tippin, Sr.; Mr. and Mrs. Waldo S. Tippin, 
Jr.; Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Tippin; Miss Myrtle 
Tippin; Mr. and Mrs. Orris Marshall; Mr. 
and Mrs. Allen George, and the grandchildren 
of the honoree. 

Guests from the athletic world introduced 
were athletic directors William B. Carson, 
Youngstown State University; and Eugene 
J. Hester, California State College, and Alex- 
ander V. Sandusky, Clarion '52, recreation 
specialist with the Department of Chesapeake 
Bay Affairs, state of Maryland, and former 
pro football player with the Baltimore Colts. 

Stealing the midday scene was the 15th 
Annual Autumn Leaf Festival-Homecoming 
parade, a gala colorful two hour spectacle 
of floats, clowns, marching and musical units 
and officials. Participating in the parade, 
whose theme was "America the Beautiful," 
from the college were the Golden Eagle 
Marching Band, 19 campus organizations' 
floats, and college officials and trustees. 

Homecoming Court Presented 

Following the parade, the Clarion State 
Golden Eagles football team defeated the 
Highlanders of Edinboro, 37-13. The half-time 
show featured the coronation of CSC's Home- 
coming Queen, Barbara Dimmerling, by Pre- 
sident Gemmell, and the presentation of her 
court: Peggy Luscomb and Pat Angel, fresh- 
men; Michol Sam and Beverly Lechner, soph- 
omores; Sharon Hall and Marsha Kramarik, 
juniors; and Sandy Brody, senior. These girls 
were escorted onto the field by Tom Paolino, 
Ed Gladora, Rich MihaUc, Bob Dragovich, 
Joe Filia, Larry Cope, Mike Johnson, and 
Rich Flore. Laura Williams, the second senior 
attendant, was unable to attend because of 
a family illness. In additon, there were per- 
formances by the Golden Eagle Band under 
the direction of Dr. Stanley F. Michalski, 
and the Fighting Scots Band from Edinboro 
directed by Dr. Donald Paiuitrui. 

Completing the day's activities was a semi- 
formal alumni-student dance in Chandler 
Hall, which featured the Contrails and the 
Brooklyn Bridge, who put on an excellent 
show. 

Concluding the weekend activities of Cla- 
rion State College's 1968 Homecoming was 
an open house at all campus residence halls 
Sunday afternoon. 



Law and Order Labeled 
Code Word for Racism 



by ED 

The panel of the campaign discussion of 
last Monday evening seemed to be in agree- 
ment about the law and order issue of Cam- 
paign 1968. To wish for law and order, it 
seems, is tantamount to being a racist. At 
least this is what the decision of the panel 
would lead us to believe. Law and order 
was tagged a "phony" issue, because the 
President of the United States has no author- 
ity over local law enforcement. 

The panel consisted of Dr. Joel Haines, 
moderator; Ngo Dinh Tu, Dr. Sarjitt Singh, 
Emmett Graybill, and Jay VanBruggen. 

The discussion was limited to two major 
issues; law and order, and Vietnam. Mr. 
Graybill began by saying that the crime rate 
of America is going up faster than the rate 
of population. He attributed this in part, 
to better recording methods of the police 
deparments. Mr. Graybill charged that law 
and order was a phony issue, because the 
president has only moral power over the na- 
tion's law enforcement agencies. This state- 
ment was later contested on the grounds that 
the president, as commander-in-chief of the 
armed forces, can authorize the use of na- 
tional guard and federal troops if it is deem- 
ed necessary. 

Mr. Van Bruggen made the charge that 
law and order was a code word for racism. 
He stated that law and order was a short- 
handed way to keep the Negro in his place. 
Mr. Graybill added that the local and state 
governments in the South have deprived the 
Negro of his rights. George Wallace, by the 
way, wants to return more power to the 
state and local governments. 

One member of the audience stated that 
rioting was nothing new in the history of 
America. He cited the Anti-Draft Riots of 
1863 in New York City, which cost a total 
of 2,000 lives, and said that when the poor 
are given justice, the riots will end. Unfortun- 
ately, the draft riots of 1863 are n(rt much 
consolation to the businessman of 1968 who 
has been ruined because of rioters and loot- 
ers. Families, both black and white, may 
lose their homes and possessions before tlte 



WOZNIAK 

poor decide that they have been given justice. 

The latter part of the discussion was dom- 
inated by the Vietnam issue. Mr. Tu accused 
Nixon of dealing with "glittering generali- 
ties." Wallace, he said, thinks in terms of 
a clearcut victory while Humphrey wants 
to stop bombing in Vietnam. Mr. Tu also 
speculated that we cannot win the Vietnam 
War. He said that contrary to some opinons, 
retired General Curtis LeMay would not advo- 
cate use of nuclear weapons in Vietnam. 

Mr Andor P-Jobb, a member of the aud- 
ience, then gave some first-hand information 
of his experience while living in commun- 
ist-dominated Hungary. He stated that the 
Communists teach the people not to fear 
nuclear war and that war is inevitable. Mr. 
P-Jobb criticized American professors for not 
educating their students about the Communist 
threat. 

Some of the ideas proposed by the panel 
were extremely controversial, and the re- 
sponses of the audience reflected it. It was 
quite obvious that many people do not be- 
lieve that law and order is a code for racism 
or a phony issue. The national election in 
November will show just how many peo|ne 
believe in law and order. 



NEW POLICY SET FOR 
CALL DISTRIBUTION 

A new policy for distribution of the Clar- 
ion Call goes into effect today, Friday, Octo- 
ber 19. The Call will NOT be delivered to 
the dorms. Instead, newspapers will be 
placed in key positions throughout the cam- 
pus. These positions include the Student 
Union, Library, Book Store, Chandler Din- 
ing Hall, and the Call office. Any student 
desiring a copy of the Call must pick one 
up in these designated places. 

—The EcHtors 



Joins Clarion Staters Faculty 



The appointment of Dr. R. Wallace Brew- 
ster to the faculty as professor of political 
science, was announced this week by Presi- 
dent James A. Gemmell. 

In addition to his teaching duties, Dr. Brew- 
.ster will serve as a special assistant to the 
president on matters of administrative struc- 
ture and will also serve as a consultant to 
the Social Science Department. 

Professor Brewster retired from the faculty 
of The Pennsylvania State University in 1966 
after having served that institution for 30 
years in the department of political science. 
He joined the faculty there in 1934 as assis- 
tant professor, was promoted to professor 
in 1947, and for several years served as 
chairman of the department. 

Taught at New School 

During his long career at Penn State, Pro- 
fessor Brewster took several leaves from the 
department to accept posts as visiting pro- 
fessor in various institutions. He has been 
a lecturer in comparative government at the 
New School of Social Science, New York and 
visiting lecturer at the Institute for American 
Universities under the auspices of L'Univer- 
site Aix-Marseille, France, which he also visi- 
ted in a similar post last year. 

He has also been visiting professor of poli- 
tical science at Haverford College; profes- 
sor and director for Penn State of the Study 
Abroad Program in Strasbourg, France; and 
for five years head of the Uniontown campus 
of Penn State. 

The former Penn State faculty member 
has been a member of the Governor's Spe- 
cial Committee on Government Reorganiza- 
tion, a member of the Advisory Committee 
on Wages and Hours for the Pennsylvania 
Department of Labor and Industry, and con- 
sultant for Brookings Institution, Washington, 
D.C. He has also served as arbitration pane- 
list for the Pennsylvania Bureau of Media- 
tion. 

During World War II, Dr. Brewster served 
in several administrative capacities for the 
Office of Price Administration. 

Lectured in France 

Dr. Brewster spent 1967 as visiting lecturer 
in three French universities, including the 




DR. R. WALLACE BREWSTER has 

been named a professor of Political Sci- 
ence and consultant by President James 
Gemmell. 



University of Paris. In 1968, prior to coming 
to Clarion, he was Visitinj^ Professor of Poli- 
tical Science at the University of Miami, 
Coral Gables, Florida. 

He earned his bachelor of arts and mas- 
ter of arts at The Pennsylvania State Univer- 
sity and his Ph. D. in Public Law at the 
Universit.wof California at Berkeley. 

Professor Brewster took un fhing as a 

hobby and soloed one week before uis rctire- 

jment. He now holds a private license issued 

Iby the Federal Aviation Authority and has 

•logged over 120 hours of flight time. 



Senate Meeting Held Wed.; 
Highlights Are Reviewed 



A regular meeting of the Clarion State 
College Student Senate was held on Wednes- 
day, October 9. At this meeting, the resigna- 
tion of a junior senator, Thom M. Werthman, 
was received and accepted by the Student 
Senate. Each Senator was requested to sub- 
mit a name of one person who qualifies for 
Student Senator to replace him. 

"the following other matters of concern were 
handled at this meeting: 

(1) $12,000 was transferred from the Student 
Union fund to the Fee Supported Fund, which 
will be used as additional funds to renovate 
Harvey Hall. 

(2) Dr. Nanovsky was assigned to work 
with Mr. Klingensmith in taking an inven- 
tory of all equipment not presently being 
used in order that a price be affixed for 



the sale of all equipment, and that all money 
from the sale be put in the Fee Supported 
Fund. 

(3) Flowers were sent to the Wescott fam- 
ily. 

(4) The budget was approved for publica- 
tion in the Call, and mimeographed copies 
will be ma.le available to all students who 
wish to see it. 

(5) A proposal was brought up to set up 
a fund to back any organization on campus 
which wants to sponsor an activity. It was 
decided that mimeographed copies of the pro- 
posal would be used in the next issue to 
further discuss the issue. 

All students are urged to attend future 
Senate meetings. 



Waldo Tippin Honored 




A PICTURE of Waldo S. Tippin was placed in the New Gymnasium-Na- 
tatorium in honor of his outstanding contributions to Clarion's Athletic 
Department at the dedication ceremony on Saturday. 



Page 2 



T H ECAL L - - Clarion State College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



Friday, October 18, 1968 



Editorially 
Speaking 



Rah, Rah, Rah?? 



A lack of support and enthusiasm 
was most evident at last weekend's 
Homecoming football game. The stands 
were packed, hundreds lined the fence, 
but there were no signs of support for 
our (lolden Eagles. Edinboro's cheer- 
ing section was approximately one- 
eight the size of ours, and they out 
cheered us. If we are number one, 
why don't we act like it? 

We have a championship team, 
and we ai e not the only ones who think 
so. Lock Haven's head coach, Herb 
Jack, stated, "They were just too good 
for us. They have a tough defense and 
Erdlejac is the best passer we've fac- 
ed." Jack also added, "They looked 
better than California." We aren't the 
only ones who know that we are NUM- 
BER ONE. 

Suzie Albanesi and Rainie Martin 
took it unon themselves to become 
"Golden Eagles." They spent many, 
long hours in prepaiation for the pep 
rally, bonfire, and the game. These 
girls, however, only number two, and 
two students are certainly not enough 
to merit praise. From the apparent 
lack of support, the general l3ulk of 
Clarion students do not care. 

Tomorrow, we are playing our 
long-time rival, Indiana. This is not 
a conference game, but Indiana is un- 
defeated and have allowed their op- 
ponents only 31 total points as com- 
pared to the Indian's total points of 
222. Our Golden Eagles can defeat 
Indiana, but they need the support of 
the entire student body. They need 
to know that you, the students, care 
whether they win or lose. 

We are all proud of our team when 
they win a championship game or a 
conference title, and we do support 
them THEN. But, it takes a winning 
season WITH student support to allow 
this to be accomplished. If we want 
the championship, if we want to retam 



our title of "Number One," then we 
must support our team now. 

This lack of support manifests it- 
self into all facets of (Marion's activi- 
ties. Clarion's pep rallies have in the 
past followed a tradition of lacking in 
attendance and lacking in spirit. Last 
Friday night a pep rally was held; there 
was a large attendance, but those who 
were present did nothing but stand 
around and stare. A pep rally is for 
CHEERING, SCREAMING, and PSY- 
CHING the team. Our pep rallies do 
not accomplish any of these; in fact, 
the only thing they do accomplish is 
show the team how much the .students 
don't care. The pen rallies are never 
any longer than 45 minutes. Don't 
you as students have 45 minutes that 
you can devote to supporting your 
team? 

The point being made is not that 
the students of Clarion don't care if we 
win or not, because they do WANT to 
win. But, our team has been winning, 
and we are used to winning. Conse- 
quently, the games are well attended, 
but attending is not enough. The team 
should be shown that the students are 
interested in other ways besides win- 
ning. 

We understand that many enjoy 
watching the football games, but do the 
fans JUST have to sit there and watch? 
The stands do come alive when we 
score a touchdown, but this is the only 
time our team knows we are there. 
Does it have to be this way? Can't we 
have a school spirit that is comparable 
to the quality of our football team? 

.Tomorrow at the game, let our 
team know that the students of Clarion 
are behind them. Show them that you 
care. Show them that they have YOUR 
support. Show them that they are 
NUMBER ONE, and YOU know it. 

~S. M. D. 



LeVs Become Involved in the 
Presidential Election of 1968 



National elections will be held in 
approximately three weeks. Tension 
is rising throughout the nation, and 
people everywhere are strongly sup- 
porting the candidates of their choice. 

Presidential elections seem to 
bring out the strongest emotions of 
both the old and the young. College 
age students are surely no exception; 
in fact, students generally become 
more involved, and are more interested 
in what is happening than any other 
American "age" group. 

Through our exchange system 
with other college newspapers, we have 
noted several strongly biased letters 
and articles written on the coming elec- 
tion by members of various student 
bodies. These students are expressing 
their views, and are becoming involved 
in controversies with their fellow stu- 
dents The national election is alive 
on other campu.ses. and these students 
seem to care about the outcome. 

Here at Clarion, however, there 
does not seem to be much concern 
about the presidential elections. Some 
students have definite opinions about 
their favorite candidates, but many are 
still uncommitted. In any event, those 
who do feel stront^ly are not express- 
ing their views. This does not say much 
for the Clarion student. Why can't we, 
at least, become as involved as many 
of our fellow-students; at other col- 
leges? 

Those who are now committed 
could have a definite influence on those 
who aren't. Whv not start an all-cam- 
pus campaign now? 

In the coming three weeks, we 
would like to see buttons being worn 
by students all over the campus, pos- 
ters plastered everywhere, and stu- 
dents openly supporting candidates. 



We wouM also like to have letters and 
articles turned in to this paper from 
students supporting all three of the 
major candidates. 

We are encouraging a controversy. 
We v/ant the political issue of the presi- 
dential election to come alive at Clar- 
ion. 

A mock election is now being plan- 
ned by the Call staff. We feel that this 
election will help students become 
more involved and will help make us 
feel like we play an active part in our 
nation's activities. 

In the next few weeks, we will also 
he conducting polls which are centered 
around the election so that the students 
can become ;iiore aware of where their 
candidate stands in proportion to the 
other candidates. 

We urge you, the students of Clar- 
ion, to help us conduct this political 
drive. This venture could prove to be 
fun as well as enlightening. 

This election more than any other 
in our history, is highly controversial. 
The issues are pertinent, and they, 
more than any other issue in our life- 
time, concern US. 

For this reason, we have a right to 
be concerned. Let's, therefore, show 
that we care — let's make Election '68 
a memorable part of our stay at CSC! 

— C. W. 



ITALIAN PROVERB — A man's 
own opinion is never in the wrong. 

GERMAN PROVERB — When 
one re-knots a broken cord it holds, 
but one feels the knot. 

POLISH PROVERB' — The wo- 
man cries before the wedding, and the 
man after. 




Economous and Cole Will Head 
Two New Divisions at Clarion 



TH/^T'S.-A" NO-NO!! 



Deans of two new divisions at Clarion State 
College have been named by college presi- 
dent, Dr. James Gemmell. 

They are Charles Economous, Dean of the 
Division of Library Science, and Dr. James 
H. Cole, Dean of the Division of Communica- 
tion. 

Since March 1967 the Division of Communi- 
cation had been known as the Division of 
Audiovisual Instructional Services. Prior to 
that time it held departmental status. In 
existence as a department since 1937, the 
Division of Library Science came into being 
just last month. 

Economous is a graduate of the University 
of North Carolina, where he rereived the 
B. A. degree in Education and the Master 
of Science in Library Science degree. He 
has done special course work in Audio-Visuai 
Education, library resources, medical libra- 
rianship and science literature. 

A native of North Carolina the newly named 
dean began his career as Director of the 
Learning Materials Center and teacher of 
social studies at Ferndale High School, Fern- 
dale, Mich. 

He was subsequently school librarian for 
Radcliff Junior High School, Garden City. 
Mich.; head elementary school librarian for 
tiio Birmingham Public Schools, Birming- 
ham, Mich., and held an assistantship in 
tlie Business Administration and Social S^i- 

t 
'i a 



ences Division, Louis Round Wilson Library, 
University of North Carolina, prior to coming 
to Clarion as instructor in Library Science 
in 1964. 

A native of Hammond, Ind., Dr. Cole saw 
service in the U.S. Navy in World War II 
and for several years ."afterward was self- 
employed in business. He received the B. 
S. degree in Educaton at Eastern Illinois 
University and the M. S. in Education and 
the Doctorate of Education at Indiana Univer- 
sity, Bloomington, Ind. 

Following his undergraduate studies, he 
served as graduate assistant and then as 
assistant production supervisor at the Indiana 
University Audio-Visual Center, during which 
time he completed requirements for the mas- 
ter's Degree in Audio-Visual Communications. 

The newly created dean wps for one year 
Science Supervisor and Audio-Vi.sual Director 
of Lake County (Indiana) Schools, and for 
two years director of the audiovisual pro- 
gram for the American Book Company, New 
York City. 

Dr. Cole returned to Indiana University 
in 19 as supervisor of the National Educa- 
tional Television Film Service, where he com- 
pleted his doctorate in ]9a4. He has .served 
as director of the Division of Audiovisual 
instructional Services at Clarion since Sep- 
tember 19'j7; recently becoming dean when 
the department became the Division of Cora- 
muniealion. 



Letters; to tlie Editor 



To All Students: 

Last week's dance held at Forest Manor 
was a di.sappoinlment to the members of the 
Social Committee because we anticipated a 
larger turnout. Everyone was complaining 
about a lack of social activities at CSC, but 
it seems that student support is lacking. Ap- 
proximately 375 students made their way to 
the confines of Forest Manor. Out of the 
2,912 students enrolled at Clarion, the num- 
ber that turned out was disgusting. If the 
newly scheduled activities are to be contin- 
ued, there MUST be a greater amount of 
support shown. 

To have $50Q and $800 groups for dances, 
you cannot expect the Social Committee to 
finance everything. We are allocated $11,000 
per semester, and to have the groups you 
want, you, the students, will have to pay. 

Everyone is saying that Pitt's and Edin- 
boro's Homecomings are far superior to ours, 
but do you realize the student enrollments at 
both these schools are larger than ours? Pitt 
pays approximately $75 per semester activi- 
ties fee. but to have Bob Hope and The New 
Hudson Exit for their Homecomitif, they have 
to pay an additional $6 per student to see 
this show. Clarion students pay $25 activity; 
how can we expect to have this same quality 
of performers, if we do not expect to pay 
for them? 

Student support is needed! Th^e will be a 
dance tonight at 9:00 in ChandBsr HaU fea- 
turing the "New Hudson Exit." This dance 
tonipht will determine if there will be further 
activities, if you care about the social activi- 
ties on this campus, YOU, the students, will 
be there tonight. 

DICK RIDDLE 

EDITOR'S REPLY 

Many students may feel that we are harp- 
ing on the same issue too often io this paper. 
But the fact is that this dance ' tonight will 
be a determining factor in whether or not we 
will continue to have paid entertainment on 
this campus. 

Several .students have stopped into the Call 
office this week with pleas of help in making 
the students aware of their responsibility on 
this issue. 

We, therefore, feel that it is our responsi- 
bility to back these organizations that want 
to make this campus socially active. 

Tho only way this will happen is with 
YOUR support, students. Go to the dance to- 
night. Help make "the suitcase college" a 
part of the past. 



Editor, The Call: 

In behalf of the James Wescott family I 
would like to thank the student body for 
their greatly appreciated concern. 

A special thanks to those students who 
on October 5, volunteered to give blood in 
Nancy's behalf, and to those who sent their 
condolences to the Wescott family. 

LINDA SHERMAN 



concert at Edinboro. The admission price 
was $1.25 per person, and I believe this was 
sponsored by the student government at Ed- 
inboro. Again, they charged admission for a 
big-name entertainer. I might add that Edin- 
boro students pay a $25.00 activity fee, also. 
My point is this: It is very simple to charge 
admission lor a concert; Edinboro does it, 
and I understand other colleges do so, too. 
The Sigma Tau Gamma fraternity had the 
right idea, but it failed, due to unforseen 
circumstances. Does anyone else have the 
intestinal fortitude to try again? 

ALFRED R. SERFF 

EDITOR'S REPLY 

In reference to an article in last week's 
Call, I would like to answer your question 
with a simple "something has finally been 
done!" Three dances have been scheduled for 
October, which will be sponsored by the 
Greeks and other organizations on campus. 

One of these dances will be held tonigiii at 
9:00 in Chandler Hall featuring 'The New 
Hudson Exit." An admission price of $1.25 
is being charged. 

My point is this: It is very simple to 
charge admission for a concert, and we are 
putting this principle into effect. Now the 
success or failure of this venture is in the 
students' hands. But do the students of CSC 
really want good entertainment? I hope this 
dance will prove that they do. 
To the Students of Clarion State: 

Thfere is one organization on campus that 
directly affects every student enrolled here, 
yet no one seems interested in the Student 
Union Board's actions. 

Uitiler the chairmanship of Owen Winters 
and the advisorship of Dr. Nanovsky, the 
Student Union Board allocated Harvey Gym, 
with the direct help of Dr. Gemmell, for use 
as a Student Center. The Student Union 
Board then approached the Student Senate 
for an appropriation of approximately $50,000 
to convert the gymnasium into a recreation 
center. Except for the arrival of a color tele- 
vision, some furniture and eight billiard 
tables, the new Student Center is ready and 
will be opened soon. 

The Student Union Board also asked for 
the coats of arms, no larger than five feet by 
five feet, of every campus organization to be 
submitted for display in the snack bar. Get 
busy, fraternities and sororities! 

At present the board is wrestling with a 
constitution for itself, so it can sen-o the 
students better. So, if you see Owen Wi-.ters, 
Tony Mattern, Ray Yutzy, Randy Bums, 
Tom Paolino, Ray lenzi. Bill Nanovsky, or 
Marg Butler, let them know of vour ideas 
and suggestions for the Student Union. They 
represent your interests! 

LARRY CARTER 



Dear Editors, 

Bev Reed, chairman of the Homecoming 
Decorating Committee, and I would like to 
thank all those who helped in any way with 
our campus decorations. We would especially 
like to thank the men from Wilson Dormitory 
who helped Ed Giadora to construct the 
scale model of Seminary Hall on the Carlson 
Library lawn. 

Sincerely, ROSEBUD 



Editor, The Call: 

We have thoughtfully reviewed la-st week's 
editorial concerning signing out procedures 
for women students. Reading this editorial 
made us realize how foolish the present sys- 
tem is, and we feel compelled to express 
our views on this matter. 

Signing out is childish. If we are mature 
enough to accept the responsibility of living 
away from home and of college life, both 
academically and socially, then surely we 
should be able to leave the do'm without 
filing a thoroughly unconfidential report. 

Besides questioning our maturity and in- 
vading our privacy, signing out is not a suc- 
cessful practice. Surely the housemothers 
can't think they can locate us at all times. 
We're not always sure exactly where we're 
going and at exactly what time we'll be 
there. 

In the event of an emergency, there is 
usually someone in the dorm who can find 
a way to locate us. If not, the student will 
nnt be gone forever; she will be notified 
sooner or later. If a girl is on a date at 
home, for example, she cannot possibly 
be notified of an emergency until she gets 
home anyway. What makes college so dif- 
'■"•"•■t? Why can't it work the same way 
here? 

There are just a few points, but the major 
point is this: We agree with the editorial 
and we hope that something can be done 
to change this situation. 

You have our support! 

JOANNE MECKLEY, GTNN^ ELISH, 
BONNIE ALLWEJN, SANDY COVEL 



and help the students learn for themselves. 
Yet the professors continue to teach much 
as they have lor the past several years. 
Should not the one who cries innovate also 
be an innovator himseli? Or is the dual-stan- 
dard in effect ... "Do what I say, not what 
1 do!" 

Sincerely, CURTIS L. BARRETT 

Two Federal Grants 
Received At CSC 

'Dr?' James Gemmell, president of Clarion 
State College, has announced receipt of two 
$5,000 Federal grants from the Department 
of Health, Education and Welfare. Similar 
grants were awarded in 1%7 and 1936. 

Both grants are from the College Resourcps 
Program, Title II A Higher Education Act 
of 19 5 and are to be used for the acquisition 
of library materials. One grant will be used 
to purchase sets of journals for the Venango 
Campus Library; the other will be used for 
journals and books for the Clarion Campus 
library. In 1967, in addition to the two $5,000 
grants, a special purpose grant of $12,000 
was awarded for the acquisition of serials 
and monographs to be u.sed in newlv esta- 
blished graduate courses and the new pro- 
gram leading to a Bachelor of Science in 
Business Administration. 

The grants will continue to be a'lministered 
by Dan W. Graves, Director of the Rena 
M. Carlson Library. 

The Clarion Seeks Manuscripts 

All students are invited to submit original 
manu.scripts of plays, poems, short stories, 
sketches, or essays for publication in The 
Clarion. Leave typed manuscripts at the En- 
glish office, second floor a (ministration build- 
ing, or give them to Linda Mason, Sharon 
Hall. Vicki Vockroth or Rosemarie Szezerba, 
officers of Sigma Tau Delta. 



Dear Editor, 

It has been noted by this student that the 
college is pressing the future teachers from 
this institution to innovate new ideas within 
the elementary and secondary schools. 

My question is, "Why, if we are to change 
the methods of teaching, cannot we expect 
the same thing from our professors within 
the college?" The professors say innovate 



ATTENTION STUdSNTS 

The brothers of Alpha Gamma Phi would 
like to announce that a daiwe will be held 
at 9 o'clock tonight in Chandler Hall. The 
dance will feature "The New Hudson Exit." 
An admission price of $1.25 will be charged. 
All students are urged to attend. 



To the editor. 

Concerning the question of paying for top- 
name entertainment, I would like to submit 
my experiences at Edinboro. I attended that 
school's Homecoming on October 5. Harold 
Betters played for the dance, which was 
sponsored by their "Varsity E" club. The 
admission price was $5,00 per couple. Before 
this time, I had barely heard of Harold Bet- 
ters, but apparently he is famous enough to 
command a fairly large fee. Here is an in- 
stance of a campus organization, not the stu- 
dent goi'ernment, sponsoring entertainment at 
a fairly large price of admission. I might 
state that the dance was held in the dining 
hall, and I estimate that perhaps five to six 
hundred people attended. 

Two weeks ago, Gkju Yarixvougb c«vc • 



To the Call Editor. 

I am writing in reference to last Saturday's 
Homecoming dance with its featured enter- 
tainment, the Contrails, and more important- 
ly, the "Brooklyn Bridge." 

I would like to congratulate the student 
body of Clarion State Collese for their ex- 
pressed recognition of excellent entertain- 
ment. The succe.ss of the Homecoming dance, 
and I DO feel it was successful, was due to 
the spontaneous reactirin of ov student body 
to the beat of the "Brooklyn Bridge." 

However, if such a snirit. as wns amp'y 
demonstrated on Saturday, is to continue, we 
must gain more assi.st.nnce from the student 
body. I feel that this support WILL be given 
by the students if groups such as the "Brook- 
lyn Bridge" will be a regular occurrence at 
CSC.' 

I' WILLIE SANDERS 



The Clarion (^all 

CALL Office, Room 1, Harve^l^^H 

Clarion State College, Clarion^ Penna. 

EDITOR-IN CHIEF : ' Carolyn Welesko 

BUSINESS MANAGER Tom Smith 

NEWS EDITOR Sandy Diesel 

FEATURE EDITOR Sue Fair 

COPY EDITOR Rosemary Slebodhik 

EXCHANGE EDITOR Peg Foley 

CO-SPORTS EDITORS Gene Herritt, Gary Andres 

STAFF MEMBERS Elizabeth Curley, Margaret Bei^rie, 

Ann Rohrbaugh, Ed Wozniak, Gary Daurora, Larry Carter, 
Georgana Winters, Linda Sonnenfeld, Owen Winters, Dianna 
Cherry, Larilyn Andres, Dick Mears, Bob Toth, Dennis 
Morrow. 

ADVISOR Richard K. Redfem 

mxmtt 
. PBtlSTLVAlU 



Friday, October 18, 1968 



THE CALL — Clarion State College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



Page 3 



A PEEK AT GREEKS 



ALPHA GAMMA PHI 

The Gammas are proud to announce their 
newly-installed officers: Andy Brindgar, pre- 
sident; Bob Ament, vice president; Jim Carr, 
secretary; Dan Novokovich, treasurer; Ber- 
nie Polski, chaplain; Bob Santille, guard; 
Dan Wolovich, social chairman. 

Once again the Gammas show that they 
are truly the leaders on campus. Bob Ament 
has been elected president of the Interfrater- 
oity Council, and brothers Jim Jones and 
Bob Gevaudan are co-captains of this year's 
future state football champions. Congratula- 
tions. 

The Gammas are doing their share to bring 
more activities to the campus. ^Ve are bring- 
ing the "New Hudson Exit" to Clarion tonighi 
for a dance in Chandler Hall from 9 to 12. 
Admission at the door is $1.25. Hopefully 
the student body will get behind the brothers 
and attend the dance. 

Plans are being made to present the "Jag- 
gerz" on campus in the very near future. 

ALPHA SIGMA TAU 

The sisters of Alpha Sigma Tau would like 
to congratulate all the float winners in last 
Saturday's parade. We want to thank all 
the guys who helped us in building our float. 
It was a lot of fun and we really appreciated 
the help. 

Our intramural volleyball team is unde- 
feated so far. Good Luck "Top Taus" in 
next week's game. 

PHI SIGMA EPSILON 

The Brothers of Phi Sigma Epsilon con- 
gratulate senior, Barbara Dimmerling, CSC 
Homecoming Queen of 1968. Congratulations 
are also extended to Brotlier Don Kress on 
his engagement to Joanne Long, CSC. 

The brotherhood is quite pleased with their 
second place trophy won in the Homecoming 
parade by their float, "Is America Beauti- 
ful?" This is by far the best endeavor made 
by the brothers since 19??. 

PHI SIGMA KAPPA 

The brothers of Phi Sigma Kappa congrat- 
ulate all the fraternities and sororities who 
won float prizes for Homecoming. We thank 
all campus women who helped on our float 
over the past weeks. 

Congratulations to Brother James Hubert 
on being elected vice president of I. F. C. 

Did you watch on campus for the new 
Kappa jackets? 



PINS, RINGS 
AND BELLS 



PINS 

Cadet Ron Musser, West Point, to Netch 
Gagich, CSC. 

RINGS 

Sandra IE. Beck, CSC, to Ron Dominick, 
Alpha Gamma Phi. 

Robbie Robinson, Phi Sigma Epsilon, to 
Linda Gwin Pitman, New Jersey. 

David Day, Phi Sigma Epsilon, to Sharon 
Hodder, Mushingum, F. A. D. 

Fred Gallo, Phi Sigma Kappa, to Carolyn 
Peirce, CSC. 

Ron Malta, Carnegie-Mellon University, to 
Linda Marshall, CSC. 

Sally Tylwalk, CSC, to Henry Sherren, CSC 
'68. 

Linda Marshall, CSC, to Ronald Malta, 
Carnegie- Mellon University. 

BELLS 

Tom Smith, CSC, to Dorothy Harley, Oil 
City School of Nursing. 



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ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA 

The sisters of Alpha Sigma Alpha would 
like to congratulate the Delta Zetas and the 
Theta Xis on their prize-winning floats. 

The Alpha Sigs welcome the new sorority. 
Delta Lambda Tau, to our campus and wish 
them success. 

This semester the sisters are selling per- 
fume for a money-making project. Start 
Uiinkinj; of perfume as a convenient gift for 
those special occasions coming soon. 

On behalf of the sisters and Mr. and Mrs. 
Wescott, ft special thank you goes Io all 
friends whose help and sympatliy were deeply 
appreciated, t 

DELTA ZETA 

The Delta Zeta's would like to thank every- 
one who helped in any way with the build- 
ing of our float. Special thanks to Merrianne 
Giffin for a job well done as float chairman. 
The effort was well worth first prize! We 
extend our congratulations to the other soror- 
ities and fraternities for their outstanding 
floats, and to the Lions' Club for taking first 
place for the whole parade. 

Welcome back to Sheila Pilger, Delta Zeta's 
traveling secretray who is here at Clarion 
for a week. Sheila is visiting us during infor- 
mal rush this fall. 

Delta Zeta's extend their deepest sympathy 
to the Alpha Sigma Alpha's on the loss of 
their sister, Nancy Wescott. 

Informal rush started Monday with the 
PanheUeoic Tea, followed by the Round Ro- 
bin on Thursday. We are glad to see so 
many interested girls and we hope all the 
Vushees will make a decision that will make 
them as happy as ours made us. 

Initiation was held on Tuesday, October 
15. Six girls are now official Delta Zetas: 
Susie DeRiggi, Lyn Klimkos, Linda Rockhili, 



Donna Scopel. Loretta Vastadore, and' Mar- 
sha Wurst. Congratulations and much DZ 
love to you all, 

SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA 

The Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority is proud 
to announce the initation of the foUowinif 
girls in the bonds of sisterhood: Carol Chris- 
tie, Shirley Taylor, Nancy Brendlinger, Joyce 
Chitello. Becky Davie, Merrilyn Firest9ne, 
Janet Price, and Amy Wladyka, 

Purple violets go to Rae Richards (;4 her 
secret pinning to Mike Dominick, SigmrTati 
Gamma, 

Congratulations to Sharon Hall on being 
voted Junior Homecoming attendant and to 
the queen and the other members of the 
court. Also congratulations to Shawn Williams 
being voted Theta Chi Dream Girl and Cathy 
Smith being voted Sigma Tau Gamme Sweet- 
heart. 

A big bouquet of violets to Linda ^reen 
for working .so hard as chairman of the tloat. 
A special thanks to Bob Ament the re.st of 
the Gamma's, Chi's, Siggies, dUd Teke's who 
helped us with our float. 

r 

Campus Pacs Coming 

R. B. Atchison, manager of the College 
Bookstore, announces that Campus Pacs will 
be available in the Bookstore on Monday, 
Pacs will be distributed on a one-to-student 
basis. Students will be checked off as they 
receive their pacs, so that as many as possi- 
ble can take advantage of their limited sup- 
ply. There will be a charge of 30 cents per 
p;;c to cover packaging, freight and handling 
costs. 



Around campus there are two words on 
everyone's lips: "Rosebud lives." 



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505 MAIN STREET 



CLARION 



Tea Is Held 

The Rush season for sororities on Clarion s 
campus was officially opened on Moncl.iy, 
when the Panilellenie Tea for Upperclass- 
women was held at Chandler Dining Hall. 
At this tea, all women desiring to rush a 
sorority registered, and the nuin'x'rs at Pan- 
Hellenic Council explained what it means 
to be a member of a Greek organization. 

The Round Rabin, the secona .step i'l Rush, 
was held on Thursday evening, for all tho.se 
interested in meeting the members ol the 
six sororities. On Monday evening, from 7 
to 9, there will be an informal party, et^* 
which girls maj- become better atquuinli'd 
wifVi one anothlr. Following a preferential 
bidding system* all tho.se who have been 
chosen for menroership in a sorority will be 
notified sometime Tuesday. 

Rotary Sponsored Trip 

The .story on page three of last week's 
Call about Larilyn Andre lacked one piece 
of information it should have included. Miss 
Andre's year in Sweden was spon.sored by 
the Chicora, Pennsylvania, Rotary Club as 
part of the Rotary International Youth Ex- 
change Progran}. 




DANNY WOLOVICH is trying hard to sell Shelley Ricken.s a ticket to the 
dance tonigiii reaturing "The New Hudson Exit." Pictured above, from 
left to right, are Danny Wolovich, Shelley Rickens, "Mole," Mr. Caesar, 
Mike Giunta, Joe Filia, Bob Collier, and Bob Amend. 



FUTURE ILIUK!)^ 



Clarion's theaters are offering a wide range 
of entertainment for the coming week. 

At the Garby, "Rachel, Rachel" will 
start on Sunday, October 20, and will run 
through Tuesday. On Wednesday, October 23, 
the Garby will have a bargain night featuring 
"Penelope." Admission price will be 50 cents. 
Climaxing next weeks featured films will be 
"Legend of Lylah Clare," which will run 
from Thursday, October 24, until Saturday, 
October 26. 



The Orpheum will open on Thursday, Octo- 
ber 17 with "Night of the Living Dead" which 
will run through the 18th. On the 19th, "Dr. 
Who and Daieks" will be playing. 

Award winnin:^ "Dr. Zhivago" will start 
on Sunday, October 20, and will run through 
Tuesday. Tho 'Scalphunters" will have a 
one day showing on Wednesday, October 23. 

Also at the Orpheum will be "Pretty Poi- 
son," a movie (hat will run from Thursday, 
October 24, until Saturday of the same week. , 




NOW SHOWING THRU OCTOBER 22 

Paramount Pictures Presents 

Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau 

ARE 

The Odd Couple 

CLARION COUNTY'S MOST iMODERN THEATRE 



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THE CALL — Clarion State Collie, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



Friday, October 18, 1968 



Friday, October 18, 1968 



THE CALL 



Clarion State College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



Page 5 



Venango News 

The Venango student body chose Pat Mos- 
er and Rosie Downs to represent the fresh- 
man and sophomore classes in the Clarion 
homecoming ceremonies last Saturday. 

Pat Moser, the freshman class representa- 
tive, comes to Venango Campus from Cabot, 
Pa., and is an elementary education major. 
Pat is a graduate of Knoch Hinh School, 
where she was a member of the student 
senate and the student executive council. Pat 
is now a freshman member of the Venango 
Student Senate. Her main interests are swim- 
ming, sewing and ice skating. Pat's reaction 
to the news that she was a representative 
was a startled, "I don't believe it!" 

The sophomore homecoming representative 
from Venango Campus was Rosie Downs, 
who is also an elementary education major. 
She is a ^;raduate of Montour High School 
at McKecs Ilocks, Pa. Rosie was very active 
in hif»h school as a memoer of the French 
Club, the Pep Club, and FTA. She also let- 
tered in all sports in the Girls' Athletic As- 
sociation. This year at Venango Campus, 
Rosie is working as a resident's assistant. 

Acting in this position. Rosie and Pat rode 
in he Venango Campus car during the Aut- 
umn Leaf Festival Parade last Saturday and 
wore the guests of honor at the Venango 
Campus fall semiformal. Escorting Pat was 
Charles Seigel, while George Vano accom- 
panied Rosie. 

McNutt is President 
Of Venango Senate 

The officers of the Venango Campus Stu- 
dent Senate were chosen by the student body 
on September 20. Chosen as president was 
Barbara McNuit, Dave Reitz was elected vice 
president, and Debbi Michaels as secretary. 

Barbara McNutt of Philadelphia is a sopho- 
more at Venango Campus. As a freshman. 
Barb also served on the Venango Campus 
Student Senate. 

Dave Reitz. a freshman at Venango from 
Portsmouth, Virginia, is one of the four newly 
elected freshman class senate representa- 
tives. 

Debbi Michaels is a sophomore who comes 
to Venango from Pittsburgh. She was elected 
to the Senate last Spring to act as one of 
the five sophomore class senate representa- 
tives. 

Sue Kagle, Pat Moser, and Tom Pfeiffer 
are the other newly elected freshman class 
senate representatives. 

Representing the sophomore class on the 
Student Senate are Tim Dunkle, Kathy Rod- 
gcrs, and John VViliszowski. 

This year's faculty advisor i^ M.r. John 
Reinhardt. ' " 

Dorms Elect Officers 

The girls' dormitories on and off campus 
have held elections recently. The results of 
these for the main offices are as follows: 

Jefferson Hall: president, Janet Kochin; 
vice president, IJnda Emerick; secretary, 
Jean McEwen; treasurer, Pat Angel. 

Given Hall: president, Sue Pelino; vice 
president, Bonnie Siepiela; secretary, Kathy 
Kinlcy; treasurer, Sandy Sroka. 

Ralston: president, Phyllis Romano; vice 
president, Cathy Smith; secretary, Sally Wet- 
zel; treasurer, Barbara Madigan. 

Forest Manor, North: president, Gayle La- 




JUDITH KARABINOS, '68, takes Air 
Force oatli. 

Judith Karabinos 
Enlists in USAF 

Judith Ann Karabinos, 1968 graduate of 
Clarion State College, repeated the enlistment 
oath and entered the Officer Training School 
Program of the United States Air Force. 
The Oath was administered by Major Nicko- 
la G. Milanovich, Commander of Detachment 
210. 

Following the oath. Miss Karabinos depart- 
ed by jet aircraft for Lackland AFB at San 
Antonio, Texas, where she is currently under- 
going 10 weeks of officer training prior to 
being commissioned a second lieutenant. 

Present for the enlistment ceremony was 
T/Sgt. John T. Madrishin, USAF Recruiter 
in McKees Rock. Sgt. Madrishin enlisted 
Judith for the OTS program and at the en- 
listment ceremony presented her with her 
first pair of second lieutenant bars that will 
be pinned on at Lackland at graduation. 

Judith is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs, 
Thomas Karabinos of Moon Run, Pa. 

College Readers 
To Prodnce J. B. 

Got a mind? Want it blown (or at least 
shaken a little)? Then the College Readers 
have something for you! 

On the evening of October 29, the College 
Readers will introduce to the Clarion campus 
the first production of their "Theater of the 
Mind." This production will be held in the 
Chapel and students and faculty alike will 
be able to view J. B. — the story of a modern- 
day Job, written by the noted poet, Archibald 
MacLeish. 

Future productions will include original as 
well as classical and contemporary material 
covering a wide and varied spectrum of liter- 
ary interests. If you've got an opinion, here's 
your chance; following each performance, 
the audience will be invited to engage the 
cast in a discussion as to the meaning and 
content of the production. 



Pierre; vice president, Kathy Lloyd; secre- 
tary, Kathy Wharton; treasurer, Linda Far- 
inclli. 




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Dr, Canning to Lecture Here Wednesday 



Dr. Thomas Canning, a distinguished music 
scholar and native of BrookviUe will present 
a workshop and lecture at Clarion State Col 
lege on Wednesday. The public is invited at 
no admission charge. 

Presently associate professor of music and 
composer-in-residence at West Virginia Uni- 
versity, Canning will conduct an afternoon 
workshop in the Rehearsal Hall, Old Science 
Building, from 1:30 to 3 30 p.m., followed 
by an evening lecture at 8 p.m. in the College 
Chapel. His topic will be "New Paths In 
Music Pointing to the 21:jt Century." 

The musician-compo-ser holds the Bachelor 
of Music degree from Oberlin College, where 



he studied composition with Normand Lock- 
wood, and holds the Master of Music degree 
frofti the University of Rochester's Eastman 
School of Music, where he studied with Ber- 
nard Rogers and Howard Hanson. 

Canning has taught theory and composition 
at Morningside College, Sioux City, la.; In- 
diana University of Pennsylvania; the Royal 
Conservatory of Music, University of Toronto, 
and the Eastman School of Music. Following 
a two-year tour as exchange professor at 
the University of Hull, England, he assumed 
his pre.sent post in the newly organized Crea- 
tive Ai^s Center at West Virginia University. 

Catiting's compositions have been widely 
used io colleges and churches and one of 



his hymns appears in the new edition of 
the Methodist Hymnal. His complete setting 
of John Wesley's Convenant Service is to 
be released by Abingdon Press in 1968. 

Canning is probably best known for hi.s 
"Fantasy On a Hymn by Justi Morgan," 
whih has been performed by a number of 
leading symphony orchestras. It has been 
recorded by both the Eastman-Rochester Or- 
chestra and Houston Symphony Orchestra. 

He is a member of the American Com- 
posers Alliance; the Hymn Society of Ameri- 
ca; Pi Kappa Lambda, national honorary mu- 
sic society, and was recently elected to na- 
tional honorary membership in Phi Mu Alpha 
Sinfonia, a professional music fraternity. 



Mass Spectometry Is Lecture Topic 
At Fall Meeting of Chem ists^ Oct. 23 



A Pittsburgh area research physicist will 
be speaker for the Fall Lecture of the Subur- 
ban Lecture Series for Chemists of the Cla- 
rion-Oil City area Wednesday, October 23, 
at 8 p.m., in the lecture hall of Donald D. 
Peirce Science Center. 

A. G. Sharkey, Jr., supervisory research 



FTA Students to 
Meet Tomorrow 

Clarion's PSEA will act as host to a group 
of approximately 400 students at the annual 
fall Regional FTA Convention on Saturday. 
The students will represent 38 high schools 
from five counties. 

The day will begin with Registration at 
8:15 in the Library of Peirce Science Hall. 
Members of PSEA will act as guides for 
the guests. At 9 a.m., the General Session 
will begin in the Chapel. Bill Santee, presi- 
dent of Clarion's PSEA, will extend greetings 
from this chapter. Dr. Harold Simmons will 
extend greetings from the college. The stu- 
dents will then be addressed by the new 
regional advisor, Mr. Theodore Merantes. 
The guest speaker of the day will be Mr. 
Roger Alexis, the former regional advisor, 
now the assistant director of the student as- 
sociation. 

Following this session, workshops will be 
held under the leadership of Clarion students. 
The subjects discussed will be centered 
around the theme, "Where Are We G9iqg, 
1970?" 

After a lunch in the Chandler Dining Hall, 
the FTA members will attend the Clarion-In- 
diana Football Game. 



physicist in spectometry at the Coal Research 
Center, United States Bureau of Mines, Pitts- 
burgh, will address the group on "Mass Spec- 
tometry; Instrumentation and Applications." 
Sharkey received the B. A. degree from 
the College of Wooster and the M. S. degree 
from Case Institute of Technology. He was 
employed at Westinghouse Research Labora- 
tories for three years before joining the Bur- 
eau of Mines in 1946. 

An adjunct associate professor and mem- 
ber of the graduate faculty at the University 
of Pittsburgh, Sharkey's major field of in- 
terest has been mass spectrometry and he 
has had 55 publications dealing with instru- 
mentation and analytical techniques. 

Speech Group Takes 
Trip to Washington 

Sigma Alpha Eta, the honorary speech and 
hearing fraternity, is planning a field trip 
to Gallaudet College in Washington, D.C., to 
give interested students additional profession- 
al experience. Gallaudet College offers an 
elementary, high school, and college educa- 
tion for deaf students as well as a graduate 
program for tho^e who teach the deaf. Be- 
cause Gallaudet is the only college for the 
deaf in the United States, its students come 
from all 50 states and from several foreign 
countries. 

The 30 students from Qarion were to leave 
at 11 o'clock last night, and they expect to 
return on Sunday. Their plans include tour- 
ing the school, observing class sessions, and 
seeing the research that is being done in the 
field of audiology at Gallaudet. 

The fraternity, Sigma Alpha Eta, was start- 
ed at Clarion in November of 1964 and is 



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In every lab test against the old cardboardy kind, 
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open to anyone interested in the field of 
speech and hearing. In addition to the trip 
to Washington, D.C., its plans for the year 
include a Christmas party for all the children 
who come to the clinic and their parents, 
demonstrations of new audiology equipment, 
speakers from speech and hearing profes- 
sions, panel discussions, and another profes- 
sional trip in the spring. 

Officers of the honorary speech and hear- 
ing fraternity for this year are Sharon Bridge, 
president; Pam Kielty, vice president; Judy 
Selker, treasurer; and Mary Ott, secretary. 




JIM JONES was named as player of 
the week for his performance in the 
game against Lock Haven on Saturday, 
October 5. 



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PRESIDENT GEMMELL oongraliilales Queen Barbara 
Diniiiierliiig as Student ProHitlcnt Tuin Paulino loukn on. 




Barbara Dimmerling 
Homecoming Queen 




PRESIDENT AND MRS. GEMMELL pose after parlieipal- 
inp in the eorunatiun eereniony during Iialf-tinn> at the 
Edinboro game. 



Many Colorful Floats Highlighted the Autumn Leaf Parade 




/••• 





Page 8 



THE CALL — Clarion State College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



Friday, October 18, 1988 



As I See It . 



By GARY ANDRES 

Tomorrow, for the first time tliis season, 
Clarion yoes on the field as the underdog. 
They will be playing the Indiana team that 
crushed Pldinhoro two weeks ago, 58-0. There 
arc .seven regulars from last year's team 
on both the offensive and defensive units. 
Their are only two sophomores who start 
out of their top 22 men. 

Their basic philosophy of offense is very 
much like the Golden Eagles. They love to 
pressure the opposition into making a mis- 
take; they will seize a fumble, interception, 
or bad punt capitalize on it, and drain the 
opposition's morale. 

They have run on everyone with their op- 
tion — Blucas, often, keeps the ball on a roll 
out. When passing, Blucas likes to hit the 
slot back with a quick pass in the flat. They 
believe in repeating success. If they gain 
good yardage on a certain play, you can look 
for that play again from either side. The 
Big Indians are undefeated in their first five 
encounters in what portends to be one of 
their greatest seasons. 

Blucas, quarterback, a six foot, one inch, 
205 pound junior does everything well; he 
uses his head, arms and powerful frame with 
good results. Draganac, at split end is a 
five foot, seven inch, 180 pound senior with 
good hands, speed, and fine fakes. 

CSC Injured May Return 

Although Jacks had been without the ser- 
vices of defensive end Rick McWilliams, 
guard Joe Lavella, and offensive halfback 
Bob Oberdorf for the last week's game, he 
has high hopes that at least two of them 
will be back in harness for the Indiana tilt. 

Bob Erdeljac will have his work cut out 
for him. Coach Al Jacks, with a full team, 
will be putting his be.st up against Indiana's 
best in years. The Big Indiana's line is bigger 
than Clarion's. Number 87, Smith at wing 
back is six foot, two, 205 pounds and ex- 
perienced. He is a senior who will merit 
watching. Coach Jacks said: "We are being 
hurt most by typical unseasoned sophomore 
players, but we are on the upswing and feel 
we have a good solid squad, especially on 
defense. 

Offensively, the Golden Eagles will have 
to contain them on the outside. 

Erdeljac Ably 
Replaces Alcorn 

Clarion State sophomore Bob Erdeljac, for- 
mer Oakmont High School star gridder, is 
off to a flying start toward filling the quar- 
terback slot vacated by the graduation of 
Jim Alcorn. 

Alcorn's shoes, now of the G. I. variety, 
following a brilliant start with the Wheeling 
Ironmen this season, are not easy to fill. 
However, the five foot, 11 inch, 172 pound 
Oakmont flash, one of Al Jacks' real hope- 
fuls, has already made the NCAA and NAIA 
individual college leaders lists. 

Latest available releases from the two foot- 
ball associations show the speedy youngster 
to be making outstanding headway in passing 
and total offense. 

With the first four 1968 games in the hop- 
per, the Golden Eagle quarterback ranked 
seventh in total offense in the NCAA book, 
being involved in 143 plays for 849 yards. 
Add to that last week's tiff with Edinboro 
and he has 27 more plays and 166 yards 
for a present total of 170 and 1015. The NAIA 
ranked him 24th in individual total offense 
and 21st in individual passing. 

Tagged as a question mark at the begin- 
ning of the season, since he had not been 
tested under fire, Erdeljac has more than 
shown his mettle in the first five encounters. 
His good arm has put him in ninth place 
on the NCAA passing list. In four games 
he had attemtped 110, completed 60 and had 
five intercepted for a .545 percentage and 
798 yards gain. 

Against Edinboro. the speedy quarterback 
completed nine for 19 tosses and 168 yards, 
and accounted for three TD's for an overall 
average to date of .534. 

It seems safe to say that Bob Erdeljac 
is no longer a question mark at Clarion State. 




Player of the Week 



C.AI.L Laoking For Sportg Writera 

Any student who may be interested in be- 
roming a sports writer for the Clarion Call 
please report to the (all office some after- 
noon this week. — The Editors 



CSC's Jaii Uctkci Hum After Catching An Erdeljac Pass 

CSC Eagles Defeat Edinboro, 
37-13, In Homecoming Game 



The Clarion Golden Eagles were victorious 
in the annual Homecoming game against the 
Highlanders of Edinboro, defeating them 37- 
13 on the arm of Bob Erdeljac and the run- 
ning of Mike Giunta. Erdeljac threw three 
touchdown passes and Giunta ran for 131 
yards and one touchdown. 

In the first quarter the teams traded the 
ball back and forth, Clarion's first touchdown 
came when Frank Sirianni intercepted his 
second pass of the quarter. The interception 
took place on the Edinboro 40-yard line, and 
he returned it to the Edinboro 22. A 15-yard 
penalty against Clarion put the ball back on 
the Edinboro 34. On the first play, Erdeljac 
threw to Jim Becker for 33 yards putting 
the ball on the one. Two plays later Giunta 
put it over for the touchdown. 

In the second quarter, the Golden Eagles 
exploded for three touchdowns in about four 
minutes. The first coming when Clarion drove 
70 yards in five plays. Mike Giunta led this 
drive with a 51-yard run and Bob Erdeljac 
capped the drive with a 19-yard touchdown 
pass to end Larry McNulty. Clarion's second 
touchdown of the quarter came two minutes 
later, when Edinboro punted from their own 
two-yard line on the third down. After the 
short punt, the Golden Eagles took over on 
the Edinboro 17-yard line. Two plays later, 
Erdeljac passed to McNulty for 16 yards 
and a touchdown, his second of the quarter. 
The Golden Eagles drove 60 yards in four 
plays for the third touchdown of the quarter. 
Mike Giunta also helped set up this touch- 
down with a 38-yard run. Erdeljac ended 
this drive when he passed 16 yards to Jim 



Band Prepares for Indiana 

After an active weekend of three perfor- 
mances, the CSC Golden Eagles Marching 
Band is preparing for the half-time show 
of the Indiana-Clarion game. 

This past Saturday, the band performed 
for the dedication of the Waldo S. Tippin 
Gymnasium, led the 15th annual Autumn Leaf 
Festival Parade, and provided music and 
entertainment for the Homecoming game be- 
tween Edinboro and Clarion. 

For this Saturday's game, the band is pre- 
paring a show dealing with popular television 
programs. The first formation will be the 
well-known Mission: Impossible tape record- 
er, featuring spinning wheels that will self- 
destruct to the music of the "Mission: Impo.s- 
sible Theme." Then the band will form a gun 
for the show. Gunsmoke. The third formation 
executed will be the champagne glass re- 
presenting the Lawrence Welk Show, with 
the music of 'Bubbles in the Wine," ar- 
ranged by Mr. B. E. Hardin, a new member 
of the Music Department. The band will exit 
in the form of a jet airplane to the strains 
of "Fly the Friendly Skies with United." 



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Becker for the touchdown. John Dorish had 
kicked the three preceding extra points, but 
he ran this one over for a two-point conver- 
son. Score at halftime was Clarion 29, Edin- 
boro 0. 

After an uneventful third quarter, Edinboro 
finally made the scoreboard in the fourth 
quarter with 13 points. Their first touchdown 
was scored when they drove 56 yards in 
five plays. The drive was capped by a 44-yard 
touchdown pass from Tom Mackey to Chuck 
Pollick. Edinboro's second score came mid- 
way in the quarter when they drove 64 yards 
in 15 plays. Santillo scored the final High- 
landers' touchdown on a seven-yard run. Ed- 
inboro tried a two-point conversion, but it 
was stopped by an alert Clarion defense, 
which had proven tough all day. The Golden 
Eagles closed out the scoring with 18 se- 
conds left in the game, when Jim Kocan 
replaced Bob Erdeljac at quarterback with 
the ball on the Edinboro 35-yard line. The 
Eagles drove for the touchdown in six plays 
with Kocan throwing for 24 yards. Kocan 
ended the scoring with a five-yard run; after 
the touchdown, Kocan then ran the two-point 
conversion. 

GAME STATISTICS 
Clarion Edinboro 

13 Total First Downs 12 

223 Net Yards Rushing 55 

21 Passes Attempted 43 

12 Passes Completed 18 

168 Total Passing Yardage 168 

388 Total Offense Yardage 223 

6 Penalties 5 

60 Yards Penalized 45 

Fumbles 2 

Fumbles Lost 2 

2 Interceptions ' ' 2 



The coaching staff of the Golden Eagles 
football team has named FMmer Schuetz as 
player of the week for his performance last 
Saturday in the Homecoming game against 
Edinboro. 

Elmer is a junior linebacker from North 
Catholic High School; he is five feet, 11 inches 
tall and he weighs 197 pounds. One of the 
25 returning lettcrmen from Clarion's 1967 
Western Conierence championship team, El 
mer has proven himself a valuable asset 
to the Eagle defense. 

Coach Al Jacks' comments when citing El- 
mer as r'nyer of the week brought rtut the 
fact that it was a tough decision to make. 
So many of the players played an excellent 
game that it was difficult to choose one man 
who stood out from the rest of the team. 
One thing that was not hard, however, w^s 
deciding that Elmer Schuetz and the rest 
of the Eagle squad played a fine football 
game for the alumni and student body 
against Edinboro. 

Eight Basketball 
Lettcrmen Return 

Practice began on Tuesday for the return- 
ing varsity basketball players, as well as 
many members of last year's freshman team 
and other interested young men. 

This year the basketball team will not be 
a rebuilding team, but one with many sea- 
soned varsity players. Only two key players 
were lost; Jim Alcorn graduated, and Jim 
Carter, who sat out last semester due to 
academic difficulties, is in the Army. 

Coach John Joy has announced that eight 
lettermen will be returning for the 1968-69 
basketball season. They include the team cap- 
tain, Joe Chalmers, Regis Ruane, Joe Polo- 
dak, and the 1967 team's top scorers Dennis 
Luce, with a 16 points per game average; 
Buddy Martin, with a 14-point per game aver- 
age; and George Lawry, who scored an aver- 
age of 9 points per game. 

Rejoining the team after a year's absence 
will be Larry Kubovchick and Bob Fusco, top 
scorers of the 1966 team. Larry, a unanimous 
choice for the 1956-67 Western Conference 
all-star first team, and Bob, CSC's leading 
rebounder and an all-star second team choice, 
were ineligible to play because they had par- 
ticipated in a postseason tournament at the 
end of the 1966-67 season; this is in violation 
of a ruling of both the National Collegiate 
Athletic Association and the Pennsylvania 
State College Conference. However, they 
have been reinstated and will play this year. 

With these eight men as a nucleus, Coach 
Joy, his assistants, Thomas Beck and Stan 
Hallman, and the students of Clarion State 
look ahead to the first game, December 4, 
and to a successful season. 




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A Letter to the Editor 



A WS Officers Express Views 
On Sign 'Out Procedures; 
Clarion Call Editor Replies 



Editor, The Call: 

In regard to previous articles in the Call 
concerning women's sign-out procedures, we, 
as members of the A.W.S. Council would 
like to express our views. 

We are pleased to see the women of this 
campus talcing .such an active interest in 
their government. There are many regula- 
tions concerning the women which need re- 
evaluation. It is a good thing that the Call 
has brought .such issues to the attention of 
the students, but who did the authors of 
these articles plan to have investigate these 
problems? Could it be they themselves? We 
have not seen any indication of such initia- 
tive. 

The A.W.S. Council has had the sign-out 
procedure under consideration since the be- 
ginning of the semester., We more than realize 
the inadequacies of the present system. We 
felt, however, that proper investigation should 
be conducted by the organization concerned 
with women's residence halls — who ultimately 
will be the ones affected by any change. 

This organization is the Women's Residence 
Board. The WRB consists of the president 
and vice president of each women's residence 
hall. These officers were just recently elected 
in their respective halls and are now function- 
ing as the WRB. AWS Council has advised 
the board that the present system of signing- 
out is ineffective and asked that they investi- 
gate the procedure. Any recommendations 
or proposed changes will be brought before 
all of the women for approval. This is the 
same procedure used last year in lengthening 
hours. 

There is a way to get results from a justi- 
fied complaint. There is a way to bring about 
changes in an out-dated regulation or proced- 
ure. There is a way to have more effective 
representation in student organizations. You, 
as students, have elected people to represent 
you, to get things done for you. These leaders 
are more than willing to help you fight for 
a cause, providing they know what you want. 
Changes don't happen overnight. 

Last year. WRB worked for a whole semes- 
ter changing women's hours. If you're dis- 
satisfied, talk to your representatives and 
give them a chance to work for you. The 
students you elect to officeswant to repre- 
sent your feelings, but it is impossible for 
them to do so when they don't know what, 
or even how, you feel. 

AWS officers ~-^ 
Leslie Hudak, president 
Marg Butler, vice president 
Pat Losik 
Sandra Bordick 
Marsha Kramarik 



The Editor's Reply: 

It is genuinely satisfying to know that steps 
are being taken to change the sign-out regu- 
lations for women students, and we appre- 
ciate the concern that AWS and WRB have 
exhibited in this matter. 

In answer to the charges made against 
the Call, we would like to take this oppor- 
tunity to clarify a few specific and import- 
ant points. The authors did not propose to 
take these issues upon themselves, but rather 
proposed that these issues be brought to the 
attention of the students. 

It is not within our scope to personally 
tackle these problems, but rather to print 
stories and editorials on issues as we see 
them. If any (or part) of our assertions are 
incorrect, any student on this campus has 
the right to challenge us. 

We did not propose a solution to the pro- 
blem nor did we accuse any party of neglect. 
Instead, we strongly pointed out that a 
change is both appropriate and necessary. 

We also had hoped that the students of 
Clarion would realize the problems, and take 
the initiative to seek the proper channels 
for amendment. For this reason, we felt ob- 
ligated to keep the issue alive until some 
action has been started. 

We, therefore, included this topic in our 
opinion poll. Its purpose was to create and 
maintain interest, and not to condemn or 
accuse anyone for not taking immediate ac 
tion. We also realize that change does not 
occur overnight, but a dormant issue never 
receives attention. 

The Editor 



College Readers 
Present *J.B/ on 
Tuesday Evening 

On Tuesday evening at 8 o'clock College 
Readers will introduce to the Clarion campus 
the first production of their "Theater of the 
Mind.' This production will be held in the 
Chapel and students and faculty alike will 
be able to view J.B., the story of a modern- 
day Job, written by the noted poet Archibald 
MacLeish. 

This production, directed by George Hall, 
will feature John Solomon, Mike Elliott, Steve 
Brezzo, Lorraine Martin, Ken Miller and Su- 
zan Albanesi. 



Democratic Regime Termed 
^Sick^ by Nixon Supporter 



William Of fit, regional director for United 
Citizens for Nixon-Agnew in Western Pennsyl- 
vania, called the present administration in 
Washington "sick." 

Mr. Offit, speaking at a lecture sponsored 
by Clarion's Young Republicans, cited instan- 
ces of "defacing and disgracing" at Ameri- 
can embassies around the world. He also 
cited problems such as deficit spending, high 
crime rate, and inflation as signs of the 
sickness of the present administration. Mr. 
Offit said that the Democratic nominee Hu- 
bert Humphrey was not chosen in any state 
primary to run for president. 

Mr. Offit went on to say that Richard Nixon 
"understands the forces that threaten world 
peace." He said that Mr. Nixon would use a 
combination of military, economic, and diplo- 
matic pressures to settle the Vietnam war. 



"Mr. Nixon," he said, "will bring peace and 
prosperity to America." 

Concerning economics, Richard Nixon 
would cut Federal spendings and lower the 
cost of living. He would get people off the 
welfare roll and on to the payroll, thus re- 
lieving the over-burdened taxpayer. Mr. Offit 
said that Nixon would give the poor "a help- 
ing hand not a handout." Mr. Nixon has 
proposed tax incentives to private industries 
to develop factories and offices in underde- 
veloped areas. 

Mr. Offit said also that Richard Nixon 
would curb crime and civil disorder by his 
appointments of supreme court Judges and 
of an attorney general. Humphrey was de- 
nounced for his statement in New Orleans 
that if he lived in a ghetto he would be 
a good rioter himself. 



Bloodmobile Visits Clarion — 




TOM SMITH, business manager of the Clarion Call, looks on as Catherine 
Yonick, registered nurse, takes a blood sample to determine if Tom's iron 
content in his blood is sufficient to allow him to donate a pint of blood 
to the Red Cross. It was. The Bloodmobile visited Clarion State College 
on Tuesday. 





Vol. 40, No. 5 



CLARION STATE COLLEGE — CLARION, PENNSYLVANIA 



Seven Returning Lettermen Nucleus 
Of Clarion State 's '68-69 Cage Team 




RETURNING varsity basketball lettermen 
and their coaches take a time-out from their 
daily practice sessions to pose for a picture. 
In the front row are Buddy Martin, Dennis 
Luce, Captain Joe Chalmers, Larry Kubov- 



chick, and Joe Podolak; standing are Coach 
John Joy, George Lawry, Bob Fusco, and 
Assistant Coaches Thomas Beck and Stan 
Hallman. 



OPINION POLL 



Students Voice Opinions 
On Wallace as Candidate 



In an attempt to break away from local 
campus issues, we have concerned ourselves 
in this poll with an item of national import 
— the upcoming elections. The question asked 
this week was: "Do you feel that George 
Wallace has any chance of winning the pre- 
sidency, and if so, why?" These are some 
of the individual responses: 

Carl Gaffron— "I don't think that he does 
have a chance, because he is too much of 
a radical. As the election approaches, people 
will realize that all he expresses is negative 
attitudes. He is against many things but there 
is little upon which he has a positive or 
corrective opinion." 

Carlo Sabato— "No I don't think Wallace 
has a chance to win. But I don't think he 
should be so easily written off. The fact 
that many Democracy-loving Americans 
would support such a man shows political 
unrest that had better be answered by either 
the Republican or Democratic candidate." 

Michael Elliott— "He doesn't stand a 
chance of winning; but then, he is not out 
to win. He is out to throw the election into 
the House of Representatives, where he will 
make a deal with the major candidate to 
give his electoral votes in exchange for either 
a high appointed office, such as Secretary 
of State, or some other office, for certain 
major political concessions." 

Larry Peer— "At first, I did feel Wallace 
had a chance, but he is making too many 
radical moves and is throwing his candidacy 
into Nixon's lap. I feel Nixon has the election 
in his pocket, and has had it there for quite 
some time." 

Willy Sanders— "No, I don't feel this man 
stands a chance. His very presence as a 
third party candidate is indicative of the 
American white society's racist tendencies. 
Nevertheless, he can not win, because within 
this country we have some people who are 
rational and will vote for a more representa- 
tive candidate . . . fire and flame are both 
the same, and so, too, is smoke." 

Nick Rutherford— "People judge the candi- 
dates not so much from what they say, as 
from the overall impression they make. They 
try to imagine the candidates with the res- 
ponsibility of the most powerful man in the 
world. And the closer the election gets, the 
more people feel shivers down their backs 
at the thought of Wallace and the bomb. 
No, we need a cool man as president, and 
besides, an outright anti-intellectual is hard- 
ly going to get much support from intellec- 
tual circles." 

Don Hastings— "No, Wallace doesn't stand 
a chance. Too many people are registered 
Democrats and Republicans; too many be- 
lieve in the two-party system. I don't think 
they would trust a third party yet. " 

When asked if this was the only reason 
he felt Wallace would lose the election, Don 
said this, "No, his personality would pro- 



bably play a greater part in his not being 
elected. He can't take in a wide enough scope 
of people in his policies. Wallace is to the 
conservative what McCarthy was to the liber- 
al. Wallace is al.so similar to McCarthy in 
that he attracts young people. He also sym- 
bolizes the great dissatisfaction that people 
have with the present administration." 

Bill Botti expressed a different A'iew of 
the third party candidate: "Yes, I feel Wal- 
lace could win, since the people in this coun- 
try are tired of the way they are being pushed 
around. Two, I'm tired of the war in Vietnam. 
If Wallace gets in office, he has promised 
we'll come to the peace table. Three, I'm 
sick of people using civil rights as an excuse 
for rioting. Wallace would bring about some 
law and order." 

Bill Maxwell was reported as having said 
he is for Wallace becau.se he is tired of 
our "pussy-footing around" in Vietnam, and 
also feels Wallace would help instill law and 
order. 

Richard Smarick said, "I think that Wal- 
lace is a good thing for politics, because 
all too often the voting populace has only 
two, virtually alike candidates to choose 
from. The reason I think tliis is good this 
year is because George Wallace has much 
more on the ball than the run-of-the-mill pol- 
iticians and 'kingmakers' care to admit. As 
far as Wallace's chances of winning are con- 
cerned, let me say that I am a realist, there- 
fore, I don't believe that he will get more 
than 20 to 25 percent of the popular vote. Un- 
fortunately, I feel that he is going to be an- 
other political scapegoat and martyr, just 
as Barry Goldwater was in 1964. It's a shame, 
but the name of the game is politics." 

We hope that all those who are affected 
by the forthcoming elections— meaning pri- 
marily those voting this November— have 
carefully weighed the abilities and disabilities 
of all the candidates. We also hope that all 
those who are able to vote will do so, thus 
giving our electors a more flattering picture 
of the candidate they are to choose as our 
next President. 



WRB Will Hold 



COMING EVENTS 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26 

—Football: Clarion vs. California, Away 
—Sock Hop, Combo, Gym Balcony 

MONDAY, OCTOBER 28 

— Frosh Football: Clarion vs. Slippery 
Rock, 3 p.m. 

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29 

-Quarterback Club Dinner, Chandler, 6:30 

p.m. 
—Indian Music Concert, Chapel, 8 p.m. 

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER SO 

—Recital: Milutin Lazich, Chapel 8 p.m. 

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31 

—Halloween Movies, Chapel 8 p.m., "Re- 
venge of the Creature" and "The Raven" 



Meeting Tuesday 



V 



A committee composed of the Women's 
Residence Board members, who are the pre- 
sidents and vice presidents of the women's 
residence halls, and other interested women 
students will hold a meeting at 6:30 Tl^s- 
day in Room 251 of the Administration Build- 
ing. 

The purpose of the meeting is to discuss 
a new sign-out procedure for women stu- 
dents. All women who can contribute worthy 
ideas should plan to attend. 



Canning Outlines 
New Paths in Music 

Three major changes are occurring as mu- 
sical idiom expands. So said Dr. Thomas 
Canning Wednesday night in the College Cha- 
pel as part of Clarion's Distinguished Scholar 
Series. 

Dr. Canning, who has composed in a va- 
riety of styles, traced the mainstream of 
music from antiquity to the present and point- 
ed out that the tendency toward expansion 
of musical idiom has caused three major 
changes in music. The first occurred when 
the first chromatic notes were introduced 
to modal music; the second occurred about 
1600, when the Florentine Camerata compo- 
sers began to attempt to bring into music 
the expression of the meaning of the text. 
The third change occurred after Richard 
Wagner, with the breakdown of the major 
iXid minor scales. 

Professor Canning, who is composer-in-re- 
sidence at the University of West Virginia, 
chose as his topic "New Paths in Music 
Pointing to the 21st Century." Wednesday 
afternoon he held a workshop for students. 

Illustrating his lectures with musical ex- 
amples via piano, tape recording, slides, and 
a group of student musicians, Profes.sor Can- 
ning illustrated the control of traditional mu- 
sic, and spoke of the breakdown of control 
which occurred prior to the end of each 
of the above eras. He predicted a future 
for music relying heavily on mathematical 
music, electronically devised music and 
"chance music," an idiom in which the per- 
former shares the creative duties with the 
composer. 

Dr. Canning indicated that dissonance, ton- 
al centers and methods of composition are 
three major elements of control in music 
which, when one or more gets out of control, 
need to be brought back into control in order 
to produce great music in any idiom. 

Finally, he prophesied that in the 21st cen- 
tury, electronic music, 12-tone music, chance 
music and popular music would consolidate 
into one form. 



Friday, October 25, 1968 



Aippointed Committee 
Befines Purposes, Goals 

An organizational meeting of the Clarion 
Student Association Constitutional Committee 
was held Monday in Peirce Center. The com- 
mittee is composed of three student senators 
and the six members of the executive council 
of the Intercollegiate Conference on Govern- 
ment, all of whom arc appointed by the 
Student Senate. 

The main purpose of Monday's meeting 
was to define the purpo.ses and goals of the 
committee in writing a new student constitu- 
tion. Other matters discus.sed at the meeting 
were the proposal to hire a secretary to 
record the minutes of the meetings. It would 
lessen the confusion and free committee 
members so that they could devote their 
attention to the drafting of a new constitution. 
Discussion of the topic was deferred until 
additional information could be obtained. 

An election for parliamentarian was held 
and Owen Winters was unanimously elected. 
It was also decided that an explanation be 
prepared to support the adoption of each 
point of the proposed constitution; this ex- 
planation would give detailed rea.sons for the 
committee's actions in drafting each particu- 
lar article. A proposal was raised to have 
a committee representative contact a lawyer 
regarding the incorporation papers of the 
Clarion Student Association so that all re- 
strictions may be clearly understood. Action 
was delayed until a future meeting. 

It was approved that representatives from 
the committee be sent to the faculty senate 
meetings reviewing student rights and re- 
sponsiblities. This action was taken in order 
to ascertain the purpose of these faculty sen- 
ate meetings and their possible effect on the 
Constitutional Committee. 

The next meeting will be held at 7 p.m. 
Monday in Room 223 of Peirce Center. All 
students are urged to attend and take an 
interest in the drafting of their new consti- 
tution. 

New Numbering System 
To Be in Operation 
Before Second Semester 

Dr. Dana Still, assistant dean of academic 
affairs, has requested that all .students obtain 
a social security number by pre- registration 
for the spring semester. 

Clarion State College in its process of grow- 
ing and expanding has outgrown its present 
numbering system. The student population 
has now surpassed the five-digit system in- 
troduced five years ago. 

The present enrollment, those graduated, 
and those who have never graduated are 
included in this system. The system is divided 
so as to enable the alphabetizing that is nec- 
essary for filing. Because of certain nation- 
alities and ethnic groups, numbers set aside 
for a particular letter are rapidly being de- 
pleted. Another flaw that must be remedied 
is the duplicating of numbers that confuses 
the filing system. For these reasons, it is 
necessary to move over to a more flexible 
system. 

The administration plans on initiating a 
new system involving the use of social secur- 
ity numbers. There are numerous advantages 
of using this system. The social security num- 
ber is something every student has or will 
have to have at some time. The general 
tendency today in all personal accounting is 
to use the social security number. 

For example, students who have graduated 
with a degree in teaching have been certified 
from the Department of Public Instruction. 
This certification is coded with the social se- 
curity number. The college payroll which 
is handled by data processing in Harrisburg 
uses social security numbers. The tendency 
is for all state agencies to use social security 
numbers in their numbering systems. With 
the use of social security numbers, coding 
operations tend to become universal in scope. 
It will also provide a greater breadth for 
numbering. 

The administration would like to begin op- 
erating under the new system as soon as 
possible. During pre-registration for tlie 
Spring semester, a space will be provided 
for both the present student number and 
also the social security number. If you do 
not have a social security number as of now, 
it is suggested that you obtain one as soon 
as possible. 



To Get The Call, 



Just Dial 278 



Ttie CLARION CALL has, at last, a cam- 
pus telephone extension in its new office in 
Harvey Hall. The number is 278. 

Hear ye, all students, faculty members, 
and administrators: H you have a news 
item or story that the college community 
would be interested in, please call 278 (pre- 
ferably in the afternoon) and tell us about 
It. 



MMMaMMaaaaiaaaaMia 



Page 2 



THE CALL -- Clarion State College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



Friday, October 25, 1068 



Editorially 
Speaking 



Do CSC Studetits Really 
Want More Social Activities? 



It was discovered this past week- 
end that the students of Clarion would 
rather sit in the dorm or go home, 
rather than attend a social activity. 
There were two activities planned, a 
dance Friday night and a concert Sat- 
urday night; instead of attending, many 
students chose to sit in the dorm and 
do nothing. 

These same students, who do nqt 
attend any social functions, are the 
very ones who complain about a lack 
of social activities. They are the first 
to blame the administration, they are 
the first to criticize the activities that 
arc planned, and they are the first to 
condemn anything new that is tried. 
These students needed a scapegoat, 
and they found it in the administration. 
It is always easier to place the blame 
on someone or something else rather 
than place the blame where it belongs. 
Students of Clarion examine your- 
selves and see who really is to blame. 

If this is any indication o£ the type 
of citizens you will become, our coun- 
try is in grave danger. The very stu- 
dents who feel they do not need to 
support school and student-sponsored 
activities will be the very ones who 
will not vote at election time. They 
wil be the ones to feel that one vote, 
their vote, will not be of much impor- 
tance, but they will be the first to com- 
plain if the candidate of theiiv.«teoice 
is not elected. They will be -the ones 
to complain about governmental poli- 
cies, but they will only coniplain; they 
will do nothing about it. TTiese same 
people will always be looking for a 
scdpcgoat, and they will always be 
blaming the wrong person or persons. 



Unrest: A Promising Sign 



The atmosphere of Clarion has 
changed in the last few weeks, and 
this isn't a reference to the approach- 
ing cold weather. Rather, we mean 
to bring to your attention the increased 
concern and involvement of Clarion 
students. 

We see this unrest as a promising 
sign. It is an indication that dissatis- 
faction exists, but, more important, it 
is a sign that the students realize that 
soniethihg can be done to improve the 
situation here, and they are beginning 
to put forth some initiative toward ac- 
complishing this improverpent. One 
must also consider that the only al- 
ternative to unrest is rest, and nothing 
has ever been accomplished by resting 
on one's laurels, or l^ck of laurels, as 
the case may be. Uniest is movement, 
rest — stagnation. f 

A headline in the Call last week 
declared "Law and Order" rf^Code word 
for lacism. We see it as a code word 
for more than that. It can be a handy 
camouflage for a rigid and uncompro- 
mising authoritarian system; or it can 
be a cover for a student body that 
doesn't care enough to question the 
law or disrupt the order. Those who 
advocate strict adherence to law and 
order may actually be advocating the 
muffling of your voices. 

It is within the students' rights as 
American citizens to petition, demon- 
strate, paint signs and challenge of- 
ficials. According to one of the Presi- 
dential candidates "these precious 
rights are part of the right to dissent," 
and, even though dissent is "never a 
pleasant experience for those toward 
whom the dissent is directed," it, nev- 
ertheless, is something which must be 
preserved and protected as an integral 
part of our free society. 

However, as is always the case 
with rights, there are responsibilM^s 
v.hich accomnany them. Sometimes 
students, carried away with great en- 
thusiasm, defending, perhaps for the 



first time, rights which they feel they 
deserve, forget about the other side of 
t^e coin. It is important, if they hope 
-tj accomphsh anything, that students 
realize they must respect in order to 
be respected. Authorities are willing 
to listen to a carefully thought-out, 
it^asonable complaint, but rarely have 
time to hearing rounded criticism. 

f On the other hand, the people to 
whom students' complaints are direct- 
ed should be prepared to treat them 
as adults. A recent article in Ameri- 
can School and University was direct- 
ed to the faculty of a school which was 
anticipating trouble. The article ad- 
vocated the use of "electronic security 
devices, closed-circuit television sur- 
veillance cameras, smoke and fire de- 
tjfection systems, foolproof locks and 
padlocks. " It is a sad thing when the 
students of a school cannot be treated 
as human beings. 

It is regretful when the communi- 
cation between the administration and 
students deteriorate to the point where 
they must both be on the defensive. 
In our effort to improve situations at 
our school, let us not become involved 
in such antics. An atmosphere of 
mutual trust and respect is necessary 
in order that we may work together 
to bring about improvements which 
will benefit all, and which will make 
us proud to have been a part of the 
developing process. 

— M. B. 



QUESTION OF MOMENTUM 

Dean says— Who not me, 

maybe you. 
Studcnt.s say— Not us, 

surely them. 
So, Clarion swings 

like its pendulum do. 
It'.s a problem the world 

around; 
Who Rains or has respect 

for merely a Pro-noun? 

—A. R. Grape 



Any 



f. 



one Tor a 



m h? 



vu* 



They will never blame the right per- 
sons, themselves. 

Granted, it is easier to complain 
about a lack of social activities than to 
attend the ones scheduled. It is easier 
to sit in your rooms and vegetate. If 
activities were well-attended, and if 
there were activities enough to please 
everyone on campus, what would you 
have to complain about? You would 
have to sit down and actually think 
about something new to become dis- 
satisfied with. Of course, that would 
require time and effort, too much to be 
expected from the "typical" Clarion 
student. Just as supporting a social 
activity is too much to be expected 
from the "typical" Clarion student. 

Yes, it is easier to sit in the dorm 
or go home on weekends than support 
the respective activities. The money 
you spend for a ride home or the mon- 
ey you spend for food and beverages 
could be spent on the purchase of a 
ticket for a group supported dance. 
How great do you, the students, think 
you are? Is it below your dignity to 
be seen at a dance with a group of 
friends? If it is, the students of Clar- 
ion have suddenly developed a sophis- 
tication that has never been noticed 
before on campus. 

If you, the students of Clarion, 
are "down," it is your fault and yours 
alone. If you are not satisfied with 
the situation as it now stands, face up 
to it and accept the blame because it 
is your fault. You, the students of 
Clarion, are your own scapegoats. 

— S.M.D. 




Letters to The Editor 



Psychedelic Music vs. Soul Referee Decision Defended 



On Friday, October 11, and Saturday, Octo- 
ber 12, tlie true colors of thf student body 
of Clarion came through. We're sure the New 
Hudson Exit and the McCoys felt right at 
home witli the warm reception given to them. 
After all, they were probably honored when 
you, the students, hounded thejn to play your 

old favorite soul sounds. 

t 

Just as you wouldn't ask Johnny Unitas 
or Bart Starr to play polo, you don't ask 
a psychedelic group to play soul!!! Wake 
up students and don't stay in your rut. 

How many times have you said that your 
parents are still living in the Dark Ages? 
You're the ones that aren't progressing. A 
new generation gap is being formed right 
here in Clarion. Closed minds seem to be the 
fad and stale thoughts dominate. We see mini- 
skirts, mustaches, beards an^ peace signs 
throughout the campus, but listening to the 
musical notes of soul continues. 

You, the students are selfish and can only 
think one-sided. People must learn to be will- 
ing to pccept changes. Just because you aren't 
on the receiving end doesn't make the new 
ideas unacceptable. Soul music can't be torn 
down completely but living in a soul shelter 
can. The world around you is changing and 
is not going to stop and wait for the student 
body of Clarion to see the light. 

You say you're the majority but that ma- 
jority turns to the minority in the rest of 
our world!! "England swings like a pendu- 
lum do," but, just as the peodulum in Peirce 
Science Center stands still, so does our 
student body. 

THOSE WHO HAVE SEEN THE LIGHT 



Help Rebuild Your Campus 

The organizational meeting of the Clarion 
Students' Association constitutional commit- 
tee was held last Monday evening before 
an overflow crowd of one interested student 
and one faculty member. When one considers 
the recent uproar caused by supposed ad- 
ministrative intervention in student social ac- 
tivities, the attendance at this meeting is 
truly ironical. 

The encouraging upsurge in student con- 
cern and participation, which was so evident 
in the week prior to Homecoming, .seems 
to have suddenly reversed itself and setUed 
back into the complacency for which this 
campus is so well noted. 

Sadly enough, the majority of students 
seem more adept at criticizing the efforts 
of others than in putting forth any effort 
to bring about the changes which everyone 
so strongly demands, but are so unwilling 
to work for. 

Immediately after Clarion's victory in the 
state championship football game two years 
ago, petitions were spread requesting early 
dismissal with much success. This is a fine 
example of the advantages of a student cam- 
paign to alter a situation. Surely the creation 
of a new constitution, representative of the 
desires of the student body, will be more 
advantageous than a day's extension of va- 
cation. > 

Where are all those "concerned" students 
who are so free with their criticism after 
all the work has been completed by others? 

The basis of all .student government is the 
constitution, and it is through the power of 
this document that reforms must be carried 
out. In other words, start at the bottom and 
rebuild this campus into a place to be proud 
of. Attend this IMondays committee meeting 
at 7 p m. in Room 223 of Peirce Hall, and 
have a voice in your future. 

Ken Kalmar 



We arc writing this letter in reaction to 
a recent meeting of the Clarion Intramural 
Board. At this meeting, a protest was pre 
sented concerning the referee's decision on 
several crucial plays that occurred durin;' 
an intramural game between the Alpha Gam- 
ma Phis and the Sigma Tau Gammas. The 
Gammas were victorious over the Sig Thus. 

The protest was based upon the assumption 
that if these plays had been called differ- 
ently, the outcome of the game would have 
been different. In fact, this same protest 
could be presented in every disputed call 
made tliis season in professional and college 
football. I am sure that if Al Jacks could re- 
play the Indiana game on the grounds that the 
referees missed an off-side penalty, he would, 
but realistically, he can't. The best he can 
get is an apology from Indiana's coach. 

Being a referee in an intramural game 
is not an easy position, and I am sure that 
everyone playing the game realizes this and 
sympathizes with referees. But as soon as 
a call is made both teams expect these in- 
evperienced students to act as seasoned N.F.- 
L. officials. Usually in games such as these, 
the players spot infractions even Pete Royelle 
could not pick out. 

If we s«art playing over games on the 
grounds that the referees are missing calls 
and being indecisive, Mr. Nanz had better 
revise his intramural schedule to last until 
late July. 

Each intramural team is going to play 
to win every game, which is in the great 
spirit of competition. Whether the outcome 
is a win or a loss, the game is over when 
the whistle blows. The competition should 
end there and not be dragged into discussion 
groups for futher life. 

Brothers of Alpha Gamma Phi 



Sign Out System Blasted 

At the risk of beating this issue to death, 
I would like to add my voice in protest 
against the present sign-out system for wo- 
men. Those who defend this system say it 
is necessary so the students may be contacted 
in an emergency. This is nonsense. If this 
were the only purpo.se of the system, what 
difference would it make when we left, how 
we left and who we left with? If this is 
the only purpose why don't boys have to 
sign-out, or isn't it necessary to contact them 
in case of emergency? 

The sy.stem is bad enough but the hypo- 
crisy surrounding it is worse. Most deans, 
housemothers and .students know that the real 
purpose of the .system is to maintain the 
"innocence" of the women. Who are they 
kidding? 

MARLENE MILLER, Becht Hall 



: Thanks Extended 

May I take this opportunity to thank the 
Autumn Leaf FesUval Committee, the Cham- 
ber of Commerce, and sponsors of college 
floats for their cooperation with college or- 
ganizations in the production of a very suc- 
cessful Autumn Leaf Festival parade. Aut- 
umn Leaf Festival chairmen and Chamber 
of Commerce personnel were most helpful 
to us in planning and executing our portion 
of the parade. 

Congratulations to float winners but thanks 
to all who participated with the planning, 
building, and presenting of floats. 

I appreciate the help given by Deans Ethel 
B. Vairo and Dr. Donald Nair and congratu- 
late them for their handling of Homecoming 
activities. 

« f 

BRUCE H. DINSMORE, Chairman, 

Department of Biological Sciences 



John P. Saylor Will Speak 
At Clarion on Thursday 



John P. Saylor, candidate for re-election 
to the House of Representatives from the 
22nd Congressional District will speak at Cla- 
rion State on Thursday, October 31, in the 
north balcony of Tippin Gymnasium. 

Congressman Saylor, a graduate of Mer- 
cersburg Academy, Franklin & Marshall Col- 
lege, and Dickinson Law School, was first 
elected in a special election in 1949 and has 
been re-elected every two years since. He 
ranks No. 10 in seniority on the Republican 
side and No, 60 in the overall House member- 
ship of 435. Representative Saylor is the rank- 
ing member of the House Interior and Insular 
Affairs Committee, and is a member of the 
House Veterans Affairs Committee. 

Some of the stands taken by Congressman 
Saylor include: opposition to gun registration; 
favoring tax incentives to businesses to aid 
industrial decentralization and slum rebuild- 



ing; favoring reviews of welfare programs, 
federal aid to education programs, and the 
United States foreign aid and trade policies; 
sponsoring bills to check Supreme Court po- 
wer; favoring mandatory retirement of all 
federal elected and appointed officials at age 
70; and favoring the lifting of present restric- 
tions on the military if a negotiated settle- 
ment cannot be reached in Vietnam. He also 
sponsored the controversial Scenic Rivers Act 
which includes the Clarion and Allegheny 
rivers. 

Congressman Saylor, on campus under the 
sponsorship of the Clarion State College Young 
Republicans, will speak on the following is- 
sues: the Clarion River issue; conservation, 
law and order, his record in Congress, and 
his candidacy for re-election. 

Everyone is cordially invited to attend and 
to raise questions. 



President Gemmell Attends 
r- Conference in Hershey, Penna. 



Dr. James Gemmell, CSC president, attend- 
ed a conference in Hershey on Monday. The 
meeting was sponsored by the Pennsylvania 
Association of Colleges and Universities (PA- 
CU). 

At this convention. President Gemmell was 
a member of a panel which discussed the 
topic "New Concepts of Student, Faculty, 
and Administrative Cooperation." President 
Gemmell delivered a message on formulating 
long-range policies for a college or univer- 
sity, which developed into a worthwhile dis- 
cussion among the hundred college presidents 
that attended the convention. 

President Gemmell opened his remarks by 
stating that "college presidents spend too 
much time cleaning up the messes of the mo- 
ment to be very precise about the future." 
He then pointed out that part of the difficulty 
occurs because many of the presidents were 
appointed to their jobs with only the "vaguest 
kind of preparation." 

The president then offered a suggestion for 
dispelling this vagueness by proposing that 
presidents should seek "more cooperation 



among students, faculty, and administra- 
tion." But he also pointed out that "unless 
the financial cothrol behind the college is 
responsive to such cooperation very little will 
be accomplished." 

Further suggestions included a plea for 
better organizational mechanisms and for 
better ways to involve trustees in matters 
of student concern. 

President Gemmell urged that students be 
included in the technical aspects of planning 
and in consultative roles. A strong point for 
this argument was a suggestion to give stu- 
dents academic credit and to make institu- 
tional resources available to the students for 
participation in policy making. These two 
suggestions were well received by the pre- 
sidents, and a few stated that application 
of this idea at colleges could be effective. 

A remark of President Gemmell's which 
summed up his talk was: "The fundamental 
need is better communication, and communi- 
cation to me means candid answers to honest 
questions." 



Romoser^ Hill 
Lead Workshop 



The ability of teachers to diagnose learning 
deiiciencies, to prescribe strategies of in- 
struction that are consistent with the indi- 
vidual student's style of learning, and to eval- 
uate the effects of the strategies of instruc- 
tion — these are ideas being stressed by the 
directors of the college's Institute for Advan- 
ced Study for Teachers of Disadvantaged 
Youth. 

These ideas were explained this week in 
a one-day workshop in individualizing instruc- 
tion which was conducted by Dr. RicHard 
Romoser and Dr. Gene Hill for the Mercer 
County Principals' Association. Twenty-five 
principals, superintendents, and curriculum 
directors attended the workshop held at Mi- 
lan's Restaurant south of Mercer. Dr. Romo- 
ser is director and Dr. Hill is associate di- 
rector of the institute which is sponsored 
jointly by Clarion State College and the U.S. 
Office of Education under the provisions of 
Title XI of the National Defense Education 
Act. 

The purpose of the workshop was to illus- 
trate how a teacher would go about using 
an individualized approach in his classroom. 
To illustrate the points to be made, the ad- 
ministrators were asked to bring a news 
item, text book, and reference source related 
to Vietnam and Southeast Asia. These mater- 
ials were then used to show how a teacher 
could begin with current events and move 
into a formal social studies program while 
meeting individual needs of the students in 
the class. The administrators went through 
the process of gathering facts, grouping them 
in similar categories, and showing how these 
groupings were related. As the various steps 
were carried out, the theories of application 
in the classroom were discussed. 



This method leads a teacher to develop 
notions of individualized instmction in tho 
classroom as well as a research approach 
to the instructional problems of his students. 



Performances Scheduled 
For Madrisral Sin«:ers 



The Madrigal Singers, under the direction 
of Mr. WiUiam McDonald, will perform to- 
morrow at the wedding of Miss Kathy Gem- 
mell, daughter of President and Mrs. James 
Gemmell, in the College Chapel. This is only 
one of the many performances scheduled for 
this group. 

Already this season, the Madrigal singers 
have performed at the cornerstone ceremony 
of the Fine Arts Center, at the memorial 
service for Gloria Yough, and at the Ross 
Memorial Library for the Clarion Women's 
Club. 

Slated for the future are performances at 
Clarion Area High School, New Castle High 
School, Grove City Area High School, the 
Belle Lettres Club in Oil City, Riverside High 
School in EUwood City, and Freedom Area 
High School. Monaca Boro High School, Mt. 
Lebanon High School, Hickory High School 
in Sharon, and Monaca Center Township High 
School will also be stops on their tour. The 
month of November will be rounded out with 
an appearance at the Ladies' Nile of the 
Clarion Kiwanis Club. 

Members of the Madrigal Singers are Ka- 
thy Barron, Nancy Brendlinger. Patricia Tay- 
lor, Mary Jane Kirby, Deborah Baird, Re- 
beckah Drake, Kathy Young, Kandis Rodda, 
Johnanna Camp, Linda Anric, Candace Skin- 
ner, Carolyn Bower, Carol Christie, Jackie 
Gerard, Chris Daniels, Geoffrey Litz, David 
James, Ray Lichauer, Albert Womer, Pat- 
rick Ditty, Richard Flage, Theophil Ross, 
Donald Blanchard, and David Klindeinst. 



The Clarion Call 

CALL Office, Room i, Harvey Hall 

Clarion State College, Clarion, Penna. 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Carolyn Welesko 

BUSINESS MANAGER Tom Smith 

NEWS EDITOR Sandy Diesel 

FEATURE EDITOR : Sue Fair 

COPY EDITOR Rosemary Slebodnik 

EXCHANGE EDITOR Peg Foley 

CO-SPORTS EDITORS Gene Herritt, Gary Andres 

STAFF MEMBERS Elizabeth Curley, Margaret Beierle. 

Ann Rohrbaugh, Ed Wozniak, Gary Daurora, Larry Carter, 
Georgana Winters, Linda Sonnenfeld, Owen Winters, Dianna 
Cherry, Larilyn Andres, Dick Mears, Bob Toth, Dennis 
Morrow. 

ADVISOR Richard K. Redfem 

■ft ti 
finRTLVMU 




Friday, October 25, 1««8 



'^ THECALt — Clarion State College. Clarion, Pennsylvania 



Vagf • 



Geography Club A Prize Winner from Venango 



New on Campus 




The Clarion Geographical Society is a new 
organization on campus this year. Although 
it was started this past spring, it did not 
become a part of the campus organizations 
until this faU. At the first meeting on Sep- 
tember 23, officers were elected. They are: 
Gloria Kerestan, president; Eugene Krueger, 
vice president; Melody Laverick, secretary; 
and Pam Shaw, treasurer. 

The Society hopes to facilitate geographical 
interest among students and faculty. Anyone 
interested in attending these meetings or be- 
coming a member will be welcome. To be- 
come a member, you need not be a geography 
student or a part of the geography faculty; 
the only requirement for an associate mem- 
bership, one who does not vote, is an interest 
in the field of geography. 

Currently, the Society is making plans to 
present membership cards to the members, 
both associate and full members. If you wish 
to join, the meetings are listed in the daily 
bulletins. 

The aarion Geographical Society is re- 
sponsible for obtaining guest speakers con- 
cerned with the field of geography. Lectures 
by the geography faculty at Clarion are also 
planned. 

In the near future, the Society hopes to be- 
come associated with the honorary geogra- 
phical fraternity, Gamma Theta Upsilon, 
which has its national headquarters in Qa- 
rion. Lester Oakes, a faculty member here 
at Clarion, is the secretary qt this national 
honorary fraternity. 

The organization has many plans for the 
future and it hopes to attract more mem- 
bers and interested people. The next meeting 
is October 30; it will include the presentation 
of slides by Miss Margaret Wiant. 











Victory Dance at Venango 
To most of the 45 couples attending, the 
Homecoming Dance on Saturday, October 12, 
was, the end to a perfect day. Eariier. Cla- 
rion had won the Homecoming game, and 
■yenango had won a trophy for its float. 

The dance, held at the Holiday Inn, fea- 
tured Cootie Harris and his combo Punch 
and coolcies were* served. The room and tab- 
les were decorated in an autumn motif. 

Guests were Mr. and Mrs, Garrison Mc- 
Caslin of the faculty and the sophomore 
Homecoming attendant, Rosie Downs, and 
her escort, George Vano. 

The fall semi-formal was sponsored by the 
social committee under the chairmanship of 
Tim Dunkle. The next semi-formal will be 
held in December. 



Venango Captured First 

Clarion's annual Autumn Leaf Festival par- 
ade on October 12 was the scene of a victory 
for Venango Campus. In accordance with 
the theme, "Keep America Beautiful," Ven- 
ango entered a float entitled "Stomp Out 
Litterbugs." 

The float was sponsored by Venango Cam- 



pus Student Senate. Tbe chairman of the toat 
committee was Deb Michaels. 



RINGS 

Judy Trotta, Delta Zeta. to Ed Codispot, 
Slipp«»ry Rock. 



Venango's i-.^v 



uiuii of "Keep America Beautiful" 



Venango News 



Melress Heads 
Shawnee Tribe 
Research Project 

In the depths of Egbert Hall, a little-known 
but fascinating project is being carried on. 
This work is being done by James Metress, 
associate professor of anthropology, and his 
two laboratory assistants, Andy Conway of 
St. Marys and Roxanne Grasso of Norwin. 

They are attempting to reconstruct and 
analyze the skeletons of 580 members of a 
17th century Shawnee Indian village from 
the Buffalo site on the Kanawha River in 
West Virginia. "The sk'^et6fi§WMfe Sfent to 
Clarion by the Archaeological Division of the 
West Virginia Geogical Survey to be analyzed 
to determine the physical type, the sex, and - 
evidence of diseases. 

The villagers were not particularly robust, 
possible evidences of tuberculosis, anemia, 
syphilis, and arthritis have been found jn 
the bones. The genetic traits of the villns- 
will be compared with other villages for biolo- 
gical relationship. The average height for 
males was 5 foot 4 inches to 5 foot 6 inches 
and that of the females was 5 foot to 5 
foot 2 inches. An analysis of the teeth reveals 
poor dental healUi; every adult had an aver- 
age of six cavities and had lost four teeth; 
all teeth had disappeared in those individual's 
over 50 years of age. 

Paget's Disease Found ■'"■ 

One of the Indians may have had Paget's 
disease, a rare malady which leaves the vic- 
tim with heavy, very thick, and twisted 
bones. There have only been three or four 
recorded cases in the entire world. Other 
evidence of infectious disease had been isola- 
ted and the etilolgy of specific pathology 
is under analysis. 

Most of the adult inhabitants died between 
30 and 40 years of age, although there was 
also an extremely high infant mortality rate. 

The findings of this research work, in ad- 
dition to the information collected about the 
animal bones from the site, which are being 
studied by the Carnegie Museum, and the 
report on the artifacts of the group by the 
West Virginia Archaeological Survey, will be 
compared to similar sites from the same 
time period in the midwest. The results of 
Mr. Metress' work will probably be pub- 
lished as "The Osteobiography of a Shawnee 

Village." 

The Clarion laboratory of bioanthropology 
plans to bring in more material from Penn- 
sylvania and New York; it is equipped to 
handle skeletal analysis as efficiently and 
as quickly as any lab in the Eastern United 
States, and is one of a small number of 
places in the nation that do large scale skele- 
tal analysis. 

The Village Itself 

The village in which this particular Shaw- 
nee tribe lived was a settled one; they hunted, 
fished, grew crops, and engaged in tribal 
warfare. A large, oval, half-mile-long stock- 
ade surrounded all the main village. In the 
center was a large ceremonial plaza, around 
which clan lodges were located. These in 
turn were enclosed by three concentric rows 
of closely-spaced log houses with thatched 
roofs. 

Dog skeletons represent the only animals 
these people domesticated. An abundance of 
fish bones and clam shells, nut shells and 
charred corn cobs give clues to the foods 
the tribe consumed. Flint, wood, sandstone, 
mussel shells, and bones were utilized in 
the construction of tools and weapons. Pot- 
tery was used in making pipes, figurines, 
cooking pots, and many other vessels. 

Due to attacks by the League of Iroquois, 
Indians, the coming of the European settlers, 
and diseases carried by the white man, the 
tribe was forced westward into Ohio and 



Montgomery Hall Activities 

The House Council's idea of a $1 dorm 
fee was accepted by most of the residents; 
yet many questioned the use of the money. 
To clear any doubts you may have concern- 
ing the use of the money collected: 

1. A Halloween party is being planned for 
the residents. 

2. Food will be provided! 

3. The money will cover costs of the dorm 
Christmas party and Christmas decorations. 

4. The cost of any dorm dances held during 
the year in the cafeteria will be covered. 

5. Expenses for any Rec Room supplies 
(ping-pong balls, darts, etc.) will be paid 
from this fund. 



Members of the House Council are: Harry 
Hont, chairman; Lynn Shuler, secretary; 
Claudia Kramer, Andrea Accardi, Judy Wil- 
son, Harry Buhay, John Shaffer, and Ted 
Pappas. 

Members of the Referral Board are: Ken 
King, chairman; Rosie Wolf, secretary; Joet- 
ta Satkovich, Barbara Winkler, Karen Mueh- 
leisen. Dale Gliptis, Don Stemmler, and Brian 
Musselman. 

During the warm nights of early fall, the 
students at Venango Campus developed a new 
pastime— dancing in the parking lot. C|ld 
weather has ended this activity, but with 
the snow coming, maybe a new pastim^ will 
be found. Snow sculpturing classes? 



CHIKOSKY'S 
PHARMACY 

BONNE BELL 
COTY 

CoameticB 

.RUSSELL STOVER 

Candie* 

Clarion 226-8450 



CLAMON 
^DRY CLEANING CO. 

OFFERS YOU: 

• 1 Hour Dry Cleaning 

p Shirt Laundry • Tailoring 

• Formal Wear Rentals 

541 LIBERTY STREET CLARION 

PHONE 226-6121 

OPEfi MON. . FRL 'TIL 9 P.M. 

CLOSE SAT. AT 6 P.M. 



1 



GATHER'S HEALTH & BEAUTY AIDS 

CLARION 

"GO WIDE" WATCH STRAPS IN ASSORTED COLORS 

Reg. $1.50 — NOW $1.23 

Cover Girl "Plus 3" Medicated Make-up In 3 Shades 
(Light, Medium, Brunette) Reg. $1.50 — NOW $1.23 

— Best Prices Are Just Off Campus — 



Caravelle* 

is made like a^ 

expensive 

watch 




i 



- ' " " *■ ^ 



RHEA'S MAIVOR 

SHIPPENVILLE 

OPEN EVERY WED., THUR., FRL, AND SATURDAY NIGHTS 

Friday ISight Fish Special Only $1.35 

Dine and Dance Each Saturday ISight 

Dinners from 5:30 P. M. 

Dancing 10 P. M. — 1:00 A. M. 



yet it's only 

•10.95 



fiUlovs waited years uiitiniitfy 
could make a good $10.95 watch, 
^ne with a jeweled-lever move- 
ment, unbreakable mainspring, pre- 
cision fitted parts. A watch -that's 
, shock-resistant, and waterproof,* 
too. The result is the Caravelle by 
Bulova. A very expensive watch for 

oniymss. 

Caravelle 

division of BULOVA 

McNUTT JEWELRY 

528 Main Street Clarion, Pa. 

Member American Gem Society 

*Wh«n cast. cry»tal and crown art Intact. 




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Page 2 



■T" 



Editorially 
Speaking 



• • 



Do CSC Studeiits Really 
Want More Social Activities? 



It was discovered this past week- 
end that the students of Clarion would 
rather sit in the dorm or go home, 
rather than attend a social activity. 
There were two activities planned, a 
dance Friday night and a concert Sat- 
urday night; instead of attending, many 
students chose to sit in the dorm and 
do nothing. 

These same students, who do n(^t 
attend any social functions, are the 
very ones who complain about a lack 
of social activities. They are the first 
to blame the administration, they are 
the first to criticize the activities that 
are {)lanned, and they are the first to 
condemn anything new that is tried. 
These students needed a scapegoat, 
and they found it in the administration. 
It is always easier to place the blame 
on .'^omcone or something else rather 
than place the blame wheie it belongs. 
Students of Clarion examine your- 
selves and see who really is to blame. 

If this is any indication of the type 
of citizens you will become, our coun- 
try is in grave danger. The very stu- 
dents who feel they do not need to 
support school and student-sponsored 
activities will be the very ones who 
will not vote at election time. They 
wil be the ones to feel that one vote, 
their vote, will not be of much impor- 
tance, but they will be the first to com- 
plain if the candidate of ttierr'.«to»ice 
is not elected. They will be .the ones 
to complain about governmental poli- 
cies, but they will only complain; they 
will do nothing about it. These same 
people will always be looking for a 
scdpegoat, and they will always be 
blaming the wrong person or pprsons. 



They will never blame the right per- 
spns, themselves. 

Granted, it is easier to complain 
about a lack of social activities than to 
attend the ones scheduled. It is easier 
to sit in your rooms and vegetate. If 
activities were well-attended, and if 
there were activities enough to please 
everyone on campus, what would you 
have to complain about? You would 
have to sit down and actually think 
about something new to become dis- 
satisfied with. Of course, that would 
require time and effort, too much to be 
expected from the "typical" Clarion 
student. Just as supporting a social 
activity is too much to be expected 
from the "typical" Clarion student. 

Yes, it is easier to sit in the dorm 
or go home on weekends than support 
the respective activities. The money 
you spend for a ride home or the mon- 
ey you spend for food and beverages 
could be spent on the purchase of a 
ticket for a group supported dance. 
How great do you, the students, think 
you are? Is it below your dignity to 
be seen at a dance with a group of 
friends? If it is, the students of Clar- 
ion have suddenly developed a sophis- 
tication that has never been noticed 
before on campus. 

If you, the students of Clarion, 
are "down," it is your fault and yours 
alone. If you are not satisfied with 
the situation as it now stands, face up 
to it and accept the blame because it 
is your fault. You, the students of 
Clarion, are your own scapegoats. 

— S.M.D. 



Unrest: A Promising Sign 



The atmosphere of Clarion has 
changed in the last few weeks, and 
this isn't a reference to the approach- 
ing cold weather. Rather, we mean 
to bring to your attention the increased 
concern and involvement of Claiion 
students. 

We see this unrest as a promising 
sign. It is an indication that dissatii^- 
faction exists, but, more important, it 
in a sign that the students realize that 
soniethihg can be done to improve the 
situation here, and they are beginning 
to put forth some initiative toward ac- 
complishing this improvement. One 
must also consider that the only al- 
ternative to unrest is rest, and nothing 
has ever been accomplished Ijy resting 
on one's laurels, or l^ck of laurels, as 
tile ca.se may be. Uniest is movement, 
rest—stagnation. f 

A headline in the Call Isjst week 
declared "Law and Order" a'^'dode word 
for racism. We see it as a code word 
for more than that. It can be a handy 
camouflage for a rigid and uncompro- 
mising authoritarian system; or it can 
be a cover for a student body that 
doesn't care enough to question the 
Inw or disrupt the order. Those who 
advocate strict adherence to law and 
order may actually be advocating the 
muffling of your voices. 

It is within the students' rights as 
American citizens to petition, demon- 
strate, paint signs and challenge of- 
ficials. According to one of the Presi- 
dential candidates "these precious 
rights are part of the right to dissent," 
and, even though dissent is "never a 
pleasant experience for those toward 
whom the dissent is directed," it, nev- 
ertheless, is something which must be 
preserved and protected as an integral 
part of our free .society. 

However, as is always the case 
with rights, there are responsibil^ps 
which accomnany them. Sometimes 
students, carried away with great en- 
thusiasm, defending, perhaps for the 



first time, rights which they feel they 
deserve, forget about the other side of 
t^e coin. It is important, if they hope 
U| accomplish anything, that students 
realize they must respect in order to 
be respected. Authorities are willing 
to listen to a carefully thought-out, 
i*asonable complaint, but rarely have 
time to hearing rounded criticism. 

■>% On the other hand, the people to 
Whom students' complaints are direct- 
ed should be prepared to treat them 
as adults. A recent article in Ameri- 
can School and University was direct- 
ed to the faculty of a school which was 
anticipating trouble. The article ad- 
vocated the use of "electronic security 
devices, closed-circuit television sur- 
veillance cameras, smoke and fire de- 
tection systems, foolproof locks and 
iradlocks." It is a sad thing when the 
students of a school cannot be treated 
as human beings. 

It is regretful when the communi- 
cation between the administration and 
students deteriorate to the point where 
they must both be on the defensive. 
In our effort to improve situations at 
our school, let us not become involved 
in such antics. An atmosphere of 
mutual trust and respect is necessary 
in order that we may work together 
to bring about improvements which 
will benefit all, and which will make 
us proud to have been a part of the 
developing process. 

— M. B. 



QUESTION OF MOMENTUM 

Dean says— Who not me, 

maybe you. 
Students say — Not us, 

surely them. 
So, Clarion swings 

like its pendulum do. 
If.s a problom the world 

around: 
Who gains or has respect 

for merely a Pro- noun? 

—A. R. Grape 



THE CALL -- Clarion State College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



Friday, October 25, 1968 



Anyone T( 



or 01 



F.fih?.^^ 




Letters to The Editor 



Psychedelic Music vs. Soul Referee Decision Defended 



On Friday, October 11, and Saturday, Octo- 
ber 12, the true colors of thf student body 
of Clarion came through. We're sure the New 
Hudson Exit and the McCoys felt right at 
home with the warm reception given to them. 
After all, they were probably honored when 
you, the students, hounded thefei to play your 
old favorite soul sounds. 

Just as you wouldn't ask Johnny Unitas 
or Bart Starr to play polo, you don't ask 
a psychedelic group to play soul!!! Wake 
up students and don't stay in your rut. 

How many times have you said that your 
parents are still living in the Dark Ages? 
You're the ones that aren't progressing. A 
new generation gap is being formed right 
here in Clarion. Closed minds seem to be the 

y 

fad and stale thoughts dominate. We see mini- 
skirts, mustaches, beards an^ peace signs 
throughout the campus, but listening to the 
musical notes of soul continues. 

You, the students are selfish and can only 
think one-sided. People must learn to be will- 
ing to pccept cbonges. Just because you aren't 
on the receiving end doesn't make the new 
ideas unacceptable. Soul music can't be torn 
down completely but living in a soul shelter 
can. The world around you is changing and 
is not going to stop and wait for the student 
body of Clarion to see the light. 

Y^ou say you're the majority but that ma- 
jority turns to the minority in the rest of 
our world!! "England swings like a pendu- 
lum do," but, just as the pendulum in Peirce 
Science Center stands still, so does our 
student body. 

THOSE WHO HAVE SEEN THE UGHT 



Help Rebuild Your Campus 

The organizational meeting of the Clarion 
Students' Association constitutional commit- 
tee was held last IVTonday evening before 
an overflow crowd of one interested student 
and one faculty member. When one considers 
the recent uproar caused by supposed ad- 
ministrative intervention in student social ac- 
tivities, the attendance at this meeting is 
truly ironical. 

The encouraging upsurge in student con- 
cern and participation, which was so evident 
in the week prior to Homecoming, seems 
to have suddenly reversed itself and settled 
back into the complacency for which this 
campus is so well noted. 

Sadly enough, the majority of students 
seem more adept at criticizing the efforts 
of others than in putting forth any effort 
to bring about the changes which everyone 
so strongly demands, but are so unwilling 
to work for. 

Immediately after Clarion's victory in the 
state championship football game two years 
ago, petitions were spread requesting early 
dismissal with much success. This is a fine 
example of the advantages of a student cam 
paign to alter a situation. Surely the creation 
of a new constitution, representative of the 
desires of the student body, will be more 
advantageous than a day's extension of va- 
cation. ♦ 

Where are all those "concerned" students 
who are so free with their criticism after 
all the work has been completed by others? 

The basis of all student government is the 
constitution, and it is Uirough the power of 
this document that reforms must be carried 
out. In other words, start at the bottom and 
rebuild this campus into a place to be proud 
of. Attend this Monday's committee meeting 
at 7 p.m. in Room 223 of Peirce Hall, and 
have a voice in your future. 

Ken Kalmar 



We are writing this letter in reaction to 
a recent meeting of the Clarion Intramural 
Board. At this meeting, a protest was pre- 
sented concerning the referee's decision on 
several crucial plays tliat occurred durin^; 
an intramural game between the Alpha Gam- 
ma Phis and the Sigma Tau Gammas. The 
Gammas were victorious over the Sig Taus. 

The protest was based upon the assumption 
that if these plays had been called differ- 
ently, the outcome of the game would have 
been different. In fact, this same protest 
could be presented in every disputed call 
made this season in professional and college 
football. I am sure that if Al Jacks could re- 
play the Indiana game on the grounds that the 
referees missed an off-side penalty, he would, 
but realistically, he can't. The best he can 
get is an apology from Indiana's coach. 

Being a referee in an intramural game 
is not an easy position, and I am sure that 
everyone playing the game realizes this and 
sympathizes with referees. But as soon as 
a call is made both teams expect these in- 
evperienced students to act as seasoned N.F.- 
L. officials. Usually in games such as these, 
the players spot infractions even Pete Royelle 
could not pick out. 

If we start playing over games on the 
grounds that the referees are missing calls 
and being indecisive, Mr. Nanz had better 
revise his intramural schedule to last until 
'ate July. 

Each intramural team is going to play 
to win every game, which is in the great 
spirit of competition. Whether the outcome 
is a win or a loss, the game is over when 
the whistle blows. The competition should 
end there and not be dragged into discussion 
groups for futher life. 

Brothers of Alpha Gamma Phi 



Sign Out System Blasted 

At the risk of beating this issue to death, 
I would like to add my voice in protest 
against the present sign-out system for wo- 
men. Those who defend this system say it 
is necessary so the students may be contacted 
in an emergency. This is nonsense. If this 
were the only purpose of the system, what 
difference would it make when we left, how 
we left and who we left with? If this is 
the only purpose why don't boys have to 
sign-out, or isn't it necessary to contact them 
in case of emergency? 

The system is bad enough but the hypo- 
crisy surrounding it is worse. Most deans, 
housemothers and students know that the real 
purpose of the system is to maintain the 
"innocence" of the women. Who are they 
kidding? 

MARLENE MILLER, Becht Hall 



Thanks Extended 



May I take this opportunity to thank the 
.'Vutumn Leaf Festival Committee, the Cham- 
ber of Commerce, and sponsors of college 
floats for their cooperation with college or- 
ganizations in the production of a very suc- 
cessful Autumn Leaf Festival parade. Aut- 
umn Leaf Festival chairmen and Chamber 
of Commerce personnel were most helpful 
to us in planning and executing our portion 
of the parade. 

Congratulations to float winners but thanks 
to all who participated with the planning, 
building, and presenting of floats. 

I appreciate the help given by Deans Ethel 
B. V'airo and Dr. Donald Nair and congratu- 
late them for their handling of Homecoming 
activities. 

' BRUCE H. DINSMORE, Chairman, 

Department of Biological Sciences 



John P. Saylor Will Speak 
At Clarion on Thursday 



John P. Saylor, candidate for re-election 
to the House of Representatives from the 
22nd Congressional District will speak at Cla- 
rion Slate on Thursday, October 31, in the 
north balcony of Tippin Gymnasium. 

Congressman Saylor, a graduate of Mer- 
cersburg Academy, Franklin & Marshall Col- 
lege, and Dickinson Law School, was first 
elected in a special election in 1949 and has 
been re-elected every two years since. He 
ranks No. 10 in seniority on the Republican 
side and No. 60 in the overall House member- 
ship of 435. Representative Saylor is the rank- 
ing member of the House Interior and Insular 
Affairs Committee, and is a member of the 
House Veterans Affairs Committee. 

Some of the stands taken by Congressman 
Saylor include: opposition to gun registration; 
favoring tax incentives to businesses to aid 
indu.strial decentralization and slum rebuild- 



ing; favoring reviews of welfare programs, 
federal aid to education programs, and the 
United States foreign aid and trade policies: 
sponsoring bills to check Supreme Court po- 
wer; favoring mandatory retirement of all 
federal elected and appointed officials at age 
70; and favoring the lifting of present restric- 
tions on the military if a negotiated setUe- 
ment cannot be reached in Vietnam. He also 
sponsored the controversial Scenic Rivers Act 
which includes the Clarion and Allegheny 
rivers. 

Congressman Saylor, on campus under the 
sponsorship of the Clarion State College Young 
Republicans, will speak on the following Is- 
sues: the Clarion River issue; conservation, 
law and order, his record in Congress, and 
his candidacy for re-election. 

Everyone is cordially invited to attend and 
to raise questions. 



President Gemmell Attends 
r- Conference in Hershey, Penna. 



Dr. James Gemmell, CSC president, attend- 
ed a conference in Hershey on Monday. The 
meeting was sponsored by the Pennsylvania 
AssociaUon of Colleges and Universities (PA- 
CU). 

At this convention, President Gemmell was 
a member of a panel which discussed the 
topic "New Concepts of Student, Faculty, 
and Administrative Cooperation." President 
Gemmell delivered a message on formulating 
long-range policies for a college or univer- 
sity, which developed into a worthwhile dis- 
cussion among the hundred college presidents 
that attended the convention. 

President Gemmell opened his remarks by 
stating that "college presidents spend too 
much time cleaning up the messes of the mo- 
ment to be very precise about the future." 
He then pointed out that part of the difficulty 
occurs because many of the presidents were 
appointed to their jobs with only the "vaguest 
kind of preparation." 

The president then offered a suggestion for 
dispelling this vagueness by proposing that 
presidents should seek "more cooperation 



among students, faculty, and administra- 
tion." But he also pointed out that "unless 
the financial coritrol behind the college is 
responsive to such cooperation very little will 
be accomplished." 

Further suggestions included a plea for 
better organizational mechanisms and for 
better ways to involve trustees in matters 
of student concern. 

President Gemmell urged that students be 
included in the technical aspects of planning 
and in consultative roles. A strong point for 
this argument was a suggestion to give stu- 
dents academic credit and to make institu- 
tional resources available to the students for 
participation in policy making. These two 
suggestions were well received by the pre- 
sidents, and a few stated that application 
of this idea at colleges could be effective. 

A remark of President Gemmell's which 
summed up his talk was: "The fundamental 
need is better communication, and communi- 
cation to me means candid answers to honest 
questions." 



Romoser^ Hill 
Lead Workshop 



The ability of teachers to diagnose learning 
deiiciencies, to prescribe strategies of in- 
struction that are consistent with the indi- 
vidual student's style of learning, and to eval- 
uate the effects of the strategies of instruc- 
tion— tliese are ideas being stressed by the 
directors of the college's Institute for Advan- 
ced Study for Teachers of Disadvantaged 
YouUi. 

These ideas were explained this week in 
a one-day workshop in individualizing instruc- 
tion which was conducted by Dr. Richard 
Romoser and Dr. Gene Hill for the Mercer 
County Principals' Association. Twenty-five 
principals, superintendents, and curriculum 
directors attended the workshop held at Mi- 
lan's Restaurant south of Mercer. Dr. Romo- 
ser is director and Dr. Hill is associate di- 
rector of the institute which is sponsored 
jointly by Clarion State College and the U.S. 
Office of Education under the provisions of 
Title XI of the National Defense Education 
Act. 

The purpose of the workshop was to illus- 
trate how a teacher would go about using 
an individualized approach in his classroom. 
To illustrate the points to be made, the ad- 
ministrators were asked to bring a news 
item, text book, and reference source related 
to Vietnam and Southeast Asia. These mater- 
ials were then used to show how a teacher 
could begin with current events and move 
into a formal social studies program while 
meeting individual needs of the students in 
the class. The administrator,3 went through 
the process of gathering facts, grouping them 
in similar categories, and showing how these 
groupings were related. As the various steps 
were carried out, the theories of application 
in the classroom were discussed. 



This method leads a teacher to develop 
notions of individualized instcuction in the 
classroom as well as a research approach 
to the instructional problems of his students. 



Performances Scheduled 
For Madrigal Singers 

The Madrigal Singers, under the direction 
of Mr. William McDonald, will perform to- 
morrow at the wedding of Miss Kathy Gem- 
mell, daughter of President and Mrs. James 
Gemmell, in the College Chapel. This is only 
one of the many performances scheduled for 
this group. 

Already this season, the Madrigal singers 
have performed at the cornerstone ceremony 
of the Fine Arts Center, at the memorial 
service for Gloria Yough, and at the Ross 
Memorial Library for the Clarion Women's 
Club. 

Slated for the future are performances at 
Clarion Area High School, New Castle High 
School, Grove City Area High School, the 
Belle Lettres Club in Oil City, Riverside High 
School in Ellwood City, and Freedom Area 
High School. Monaca Boro High School, Mt. 
Lebanon High School, Hickory High School 
in Sharon, and Monaca Center Township High 
School will also be stops on their tour. The 
month of November will be rounded out with 
an appearance at the Ladies' Nite of the 
Clarion Kiwanis Club. 

Members of the Madrigal Singers are Ka- 
thy Barron, Nancy Brendlinger. Patricia Tay- 
lor. Mary Jane Kirby, Deborah Baird, Re- 
beckah Drake, Kathy Young, Kandis Rodda, 
Johnanna Camp, Linda Anric, Candace Skin- 
ner, Carolyn Bower, Carol Christie, Jackie 
Gerard, Chris Daniels, Geoffrey Litz, David 
James, Ray Lichauer, Albert Womer, Pat- 
rick Ditty, Richard Flage, Theophil Ross, 
Donald Blanchard, and David Klindeinst. 



The Clarion Call 

CALL Office, Room I, Harvey Hall 

Clarion State College, Clarion, Penna. 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Carolyn Welesko 

BUSINESS MANAGER Tom Smith 

NEWS EDITOR Sandy Diesel 

FEATURE EDITOR Sue Fair 

COPY EDITOR Rosemary Slebodnik 

EXCHANGE EDITOR Peg Foley 

CO-SPORTS EDITORS Gene Herritt, Gary Andres 

STAFF MEMBERS Elizabeth Curley, Margaret Beierle, 

Ann Rohrbaugh, Ed Wozniak, Gary Daurora, Larry Carter, 
Georgana Winters, Linda Sonnenfeld, Owen Winters, Dianna 
Cherry, Larilyn Andres, Dick Mears, Bob Toth, Dennis 
Morrow. 

ADVISOR Richard K. Redfem 

ifllti 

raisnfAiu 




' 



fridty, October 25, 1««8 



- THE CALt — Clarion .mate Cpll^.ge. Clarion. Pennsylvania 



!»««• • 



Geography Club A Prize Winner from Venango 



New on Campus 

The Clarion Geographical Society is a new 
organization on campus this year. Although 
it was started this past spring, it did not 
become a part of the campus organizations 
until this faU. At the first meeting on Sep- 
tember 23, officers were elected. They are: 
Gloria Kerestan, president; Eugene Krueger, 
vice president; Melody Laveriek, secretary; 
and Pam Shaw, treasurer. 

The Society hopes to facilitate geographical 
interest among students and faculty. Anyone 
Interested in attending these meetings or be- 
coming a member will be welcome. To be- 
come a member, you need not be a geography 
student or a part of the geography faculty; 
the only requirement for an associate mem- 
bership, one who does not vote, is an interest 
in the field of geography. 

Currently, the Society is making plans to 
present membership cards to the members, 
both associate and full members. If you wish 
to join, the meetings are listed in the daily 

bulletins. 

The Clarion Geographical Society is re- 
sponsible for obtaining guest speakers con- 
cerned with the field of geography. Lectures 
by the geography faculty at Qarion are also 
planned. 

In the near future, the Society hopes to be- 
come associated with the honorary geogra- 
phical fraternity. Gamma Theta Upsilon, 
which has its national headquarters in Cla- 
rion. Lester Oakes, a faculty member here 
at Clarion, is the secretary of this national 
honorary fraternity. 

The organization has man>' plans for the 
future and it hopes to attract more mem- 
bers and interested people. The next meeting 
is October 30; it will include the presentation 
of slides by Miss Margaret Wiant. 

Metress Heads 
Shawnee Tribe 
Research Project 

In the depths of Egbert HaU. a little-known 
but fascinating project is being carried on. 
This work is being done by James Metress, 
associate professor of anthropology, and his 
two laboratory assistants, Andy Conway of 
St. Marys and Roxanne Grasso of Norwin. 

They are attempting to reconstruct and 
analyze the skeletons of 580 members of a 
17th century Shawnee Indian village from 
the Buffalo site on the Kanawha River in 
West Virginia. "The sk'^etomWAVfe «fent tor " 
Clarion by the Archaeological Division of the 
West Virginia Geogical Survey to be analyzed 
to determine the physical type, the sex, and 
evidence of diseases. 

The villagers were not particularly robust, 
possible evidences of tuberculosis, anemia, 
syphilis, and arthritis have been found m 
the bones. The genetic traits of the vill?£« 
will be compared with other villages for biolo- 
gical relationship. The average height for 
males was 5 foot 4 inches to 5 foot 6 inches 
and that of the females was 5 foot to 5 
foot 2 inches. An analysis of the teeth reveals 
poor dental health; every adult had an aver- 
age of six cavities and had lost four teeth; 
all teeth had disappeared m those individual's 
over 50 years of age. 

Paget's Disease Found 

One of the Indians may have had Paget's 
disease, a rare malady which leaves the vic- 
tim with heavy, very thick, and twisted 
bones. There have only been three or four 
recorded cases in the entire world. Other 
evidence of infectious disease had been isola- 
ted and the etilolgy of specific pathology 
is under analysis. 

Most of the adult inhabitants died between 
30 and 40 years of age, although there was 
also an extremely high infant mortality rate. 

The findings of this research work, in ad- 
dition to the information collected about the 
animal bones from the site, which are being 
studied by the Carnegie Museum, and the 
report on the artifacts of the group by the 
West Virginia Archaeological Survey, will be 
compared to similar sites from the same 
time period in the midwest. The results of 
Mr. Metress' work will probably be pub- 
lished as "The Osteobiography of a Shawnee 

Village." 

The Clarion laboratory of bio anthropology 
plans to bring in more material from Penn- 
sylvania and New York; it is equipped to 
handle skeletal analysis as efficiently and 
as quickly as any lab in the Eastern United 
States, and is one of a small number of 
places in the nation that do large scale skele- 
tal analysis. 

The VUlage Itself 

The village in which this particular Shaw- 
nee tribe lived was a settled one : they hunted, 
fished, grew crops, and engaged in tribal 
warfare. A large, oval, half-mile-long stock- 
ade surrounded all the main village. In the 
center was a large ceremonial plaza, around 
which clan lodges were located. These in 
turn were enclosed by three concentric rows 
of closely-spaced log houses with thatched 
roofs. 

Dog skeletons represent the only animals 
these people domesticated. An abundance of 
fish bones and clam shells, nut shells and 
charred corn cobs give clues to the foods 
the tribe consumed. Flint, wood, sandstone, 
mussel shells, and bones were utilized in 
the construction of tools and weapons. Pot- 
tery was used in making pipes, figurines, 
cooking pots, and many other vessels. 

Due to attacks by the League of Iroquois, 
Indians, the coming of the European .settlers, 
and diseases carried by the whit«-man. the 
tribe was forced westward into Ohio and 



yi.j 






Victory Dance at Venango 
To most of the 45 couples attending, the 
Homecoming Dance on Saturday, October 12. 
was the end to a perfect day. Eariier, Cla- 
rion had won the Homecoming game, and 
Venango had won a trophy for its float. 

The dance, held at the Holiday Inn. fea- 
tured Cootie Harris and his combo. Punch 
and cookies wer«» served. The room and tab- 
les were decorated in an autumn motif. 

Guests were Mr. and Mrs. Garrison Mc- 
Caslin of the faculty and the sophomore 
Homecoming attendant. Rosie Downs, and 
her escort, George Vano. 

The fall semi-formal was sponsored by the 
social committee under the chairmanship of 
Tim Dunkle. The next semi-formal will be 
held in December. 



Venango Captured First 

aarion's annual Autumn Leaf Festival par- 
ade on October 12 was the scene of a victory 
for Venango Campus. In accordance with 
the theme, "Keep America Beautiful," Ven- 
ango entered a float entitled "Stomp Out 
Litterbugs." 

The float was sponsored by Venango Cam- 



pus Student Senate. Tlie dxairman of the float 
committee was Deb Michaels. 



RINGS 

Judy Trotta, Delta Zcta. to Ed Codispot, 
Slippery Rock. 



Venango's Interpictaiun of "Keep America BeauUful' 



Venango News 



Montgomery Hall Activities 

The House Council's idea of a $1 dorm 
fee was accepted by most of the residents; 
yet many questioned the use of the money. 
To clear any doubts you may have concern- 
ing the use of the money collected: 

1. A HaUoween party is being planned for 
the residents. 

2. Food will be provided! 

3. The money will cover costs of the dorm 
Christmas party and Christmas decorations. 

4. The cost of any dorm dances held during 
the year in the cafeteria will be covered. 

5. Expenses for any Rec Room supplies 
(ping-pong balls, darts, etc.) will be paid 
from this fund. 



Members of the House Council are: Harry 
Hont, chairman; Lynn Shuler, secretary; 
Claudia Kramer, Andrea Accardi, Judy Wil- 
son, Harry Buhay, John Shaffer, and Ted 
Pappas. 

Members of the Referral Board are: Ken 
King, chairman; Rosie Wolf, secretary; Joet- 
ta Satkovich, Barbara Winkler, Karen Mueh- 
leisen. Dale Gliptis, Don Stemmler, and Brian 
Musselman. 

During the warm nights of early fall, the 
students at Venango Campus developed a new 
pattime— dancing in the parking lot. Cjjkl 
weather has ended this activity, but with 
the snow coming, maybe a new pastima will 
be found. Snow sculpturing classes? 1 



CHIKOSKY'S 
PHARMACY 

BONNE BELL 
COTY 

Cosmetics 

KUSSELL STOVER 

Cemdies 

Clarion 226-8450 



CLAMON 
f^y CLEANING CO. 

OFFERS YOU: 

• 1 Hour Dry Cleaning 

Jl Shirt Laundry • Tailoring 

• Formal Wear Rentals 

t 

541 LIBERTY STREET CLARION 

PHONE 226-6121 

OPEN MON. . FRI. 'TIL 9 P.M. 

CLOSE SAT. AT 6 P.M. 



GATHER'S HEALTH & BEAUTY AIDS 

CLARION 

«GO WIDE" WATCH STRAPS IN ASSORTED COLORS 

Reg. $L50 — NOW $1.23 

Caver Girl "Plus 3" Medicated Make-iip In 3 Shades 
(Light, Medium, Brunette) Reg. $1.50 — NOW $1.23 

— Best Prices Are Just Off Campus — 



RHEA'S MAIVOR 

SHIPPENVILLE 

OPEN EVERY WED., THUR., FRI., AND SATURDAY NIGHTS 

Friday ISight Fish Special Only $1.35 

Dine and Dance Each Saturday ISight 

Dinners from 5:30 P. M. 

Dancing 10 P. M. — 1:00 A. M. 



As advertised in PL.^YBOY V 




Bates 
Floaters' 

Leisure Footwear 




iW 



Traditionally correct for casual wear, pile lined or unlined, 

the Bates Floater Knock-A-Boot. 

Colors in Spanish moss, black glove leather uppers. 

Cactus, London brown shag uppers. 

Sizes 3K» - 13 M-W 

Campus Shoe Store 



505 MAIN STREET 



CLARION 



Caravelle* 

is made like B,n 

expensive 

wateh 




yet it's only 

•10.95 



Btilova waited years uiitinhey 
could make a good $10.95 watch. 
jQne with a jeweled-lever move- 
ment, unbrealoble mainspring, pre- 
cision fitted parts. A watch -that's 
. $hocl<-resistant, and waterproof,* 
too. The result is the Caravelle Iv 
Bulova. A very expensive watch for 
oniy$10«95. 

Caravelle 

diylstonofeULOVA 

McNUTT JEWELRY 

528 Main Street Clarion, Pa. 

Member American Gem Society 

•When ca««, crystal and crown art Intact. 




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Page 4 



Becker Chosen 
Player of Week 

Gentleman Jim Becker caught two touch- 
down passes and doubled as a running back 
to earn the Player of the W*ek Award for 
the Clarion-Indiana game. 

Jim's final effort was a spectacular catch 
of a %-yard bomb to end the third quarter. 
He previously caught Clarion's other touch- 
down pass for three yards earlier in the 
same period. 

The quiet, soft-spoken Becker is a 160-pound 
senior. The six-foot wingback has been a 
clutch receiver all .sca.son. Becker, a graduate 
of North Catholic High School in Pittsburgh, 
has often appeared in the line score as one 
of Clarion's leading receivers. 

Jim carries number 20 jersey and a lot 
of courage onto the field. He was an es- 
sential part of Clarion's last two Western 
Conference championships and is a vital cog 
in Erdeijac's passing game and in Coach 
Al Jacks' current bid to repeat. 



JIM BECKER 



Lazich to Present Voice Recital; 
Third /n Music Faculty Series 



MUutin Lazich, instructor of Music, will 
present a recital in voice (bass) at 8 p.m. 
Wednesday in the College Chapel. This re- 
cital is third in the faculty recital series 
presented by the Music Department of Cla- 
rion State College. The public is cordially 
invited to attend this event. 

Mr. Lazich started his undergraduate ca- 
reer at Northeast Missouri State Teachers 
College, where he was a recipient of a schol- 
arship in voice and violin. In 1965, he com- 
pleted his bachelor's degree in music educa- 
tion at Indiana University, Bloomington, In- 
diana, with a concentration in voice. This 
past summer, Mr. Lazich received his mas- 
ter's degree in voice and vocal pedagogy 
also from Indiana University at Bloomington. 

In additicm to his academic training, Mr. 
Lazich comes to Clarion State College with 
extensive experience in singing. During his 
undergraduate days, he performed in the col- 
lege orchestra, participated in the college 
choir and sang in more than eight operas 
presented by the Indiana University's School 
of Music. As a graduate student, he sang 
leading roles in approximately 10 operas, 
«uch as "Magic Flute," "Rigoletto," "Mac- 
beth," "Bartered Bride," "Andrea Chenier," 
and "Die Meister singer." 

During the summers between 1960-63, he 
was employed as a singer and actor in the 
summerstock theatre season of the Municipal 
Opera in St. Louis, Missouri. He performed 




MILUTIN LAZICH 

in approximately 40 musicals during that 
time, some of which have been "South Paci- 
fic," "Annie Get Your Gun," "Kiss Me 
Kate," "Unsinkable Molly Brown," "Briga- 
doon," "Pajama Game," "Lil Abner," "Can 
Can," "Student Prince," and "Oklahoma." 



A Peek At Greeks 



SIGMA TAU GAMMA 

The brothers of Sigma Tau Gamma, under 
the guidance of brother Thad Droast, head 
of security, are still selling raffle tickets 
for the Panasonic portable table stereo set. 
The drawing will be held November 2 at the 
Shippensburg game. Tickets are available 
from any brother. 

Money from this raffle and future projects 
will be put into the renovation of the Sig 
Tau house. Items being considered are wall- 
to-wall carpeting throughout the house, 
new doors, new drapery, painting all rooms 
and halls, and the possibili^ of iidditional 
water pressure for the showers. 

Pinnings took place recently between Mike 
"Hawk" McCormick and C£»thie Pod^ny, a 
Sigma Kappa from Indiana; and Mike "Dog" 
Dominick and Rae Richards, Sigma Sigma 
Sigma. 

THETI CHI 

Belated best wishes to Ed and Merlene 
Weicht Douglas and Gene and Linda Smith 
Smith. Best wishes are also in order on the 
recent marriages of Greg and Lynn Davis 
Pierce and Jim aAd Kathy Sweeney Levey. 

Congratulations to.Zeb Smarick and Janey 
Krchnak on their being lavaliered. 

Congratulations also to the first-place float 
winners, Theta Xi and Delta Zeta. 

At this time we are proud to announce 
our new pledge class and welcome them into 
the fold: Damon Morris, Don Metcalf, Frank 
South, Jim Clouse, John Brumberg, Rick Le- 
wis, Jim Trunzo, Waly Rapp, Tom Camise, 
• John Hafera, and Ray Raechner. 

A fine rush party, chairmaned by Doug 
Shaffer, was held at the Hullabaloo Scene 
(Klingy's Palace) and entertainment was fur- 
nished by George Tweedy and his band, The 
.Sigma Sigma Sigma Singing Group, The Del- 
tones, and Nancy Yates and Donna Wagner, 
our go-go girls. We would like to express 
our thanks to these people and anyone else 
who had a part in making our rush party 
a huge success. 

Theta Chi is proud to announce the Dream 
Girl for the year, Miss Shawn Williams of 
Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority. 

Before closing, Theta Chi would like to 
wish good luck to the Golden Eagles at Cali- 
fornia this weekend. As far as we're con- 
cerned, the Eagles are like the Packers used 
to be under the direction of Vince Lombardi, 
because Al Jacks' team might lose a game 
occasionally, but when it comes to the nitty- 
gritty, the Eagles, like "TTie Pack." are the 
t«am you put your money wi. Say it loud, 
•'we're number one, and we're proud." 

ALPHA SIGMA TAU 

The sisters of Alpha Sigma Tau are proud 
to announce their fall pledge class: Sharon 
Fierst, Nancy Graoberg, Peggy Harding, Ma- 



ry Ellen Milowicki, Nene Morella, Nancy 
Plese, and Kathy Steinard. These sure are 
girls to be proud of. The pledges were ribbon 
pledged on Tuesday night, October 22, 1968. 
We wish them luck in their eight weeks of 
pledging under the faithful leadership of their 
pledge mistress, Carol Kahle. 

The AST Sextet want to thank the brothers 
of Phi Sigma Epsilon, Tau Kappa Epsilon, 
and Theta Chi for asking them to sing at 
their smokers although sorority rush parties 
kept them away. We sure are sorry we 
missed them and hope we can help you out 
some other time. 

We'd like to thank the brothers of Alpha 
Gamma Phi for their warm reception at their 
smoker. 

The CSC Eagles made a fine performance 
in last Saturday's game against Indiana, We 
were behind you all the way team, and we're 
still "Number One!" 

The sisters would like to thank the student 
body for supporting last week's dance at 
Forest Manor. We hope to have more in 
the future. 

PHI SIGMA EPSILON 

The brothers of Phi Sigma Epsilon con- 
gratulate the Clarion football team on a game 
well played against Indiana University. The 
Phi Sigs know that we're "Number One," 
and wish good luck to the football team at 
California this Saturday. 

Congratulations are also extended to Bro- 
ther Art Triveri who was pinned to Susan 
Montgomery of Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania. 

ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA 

Tuesday night the sisters of Alpha Sigma 
Alpha picked up their pledges and celebrated 
with pizza and coke. The pledges, Bev Reed, 
Mary Jordan, Karyn Zunich, Phyllis Romano, 
Denny Folmar, Barb Blake, Carol Stewart, 
and Melinda Beckstine had a good time and 
became better acquainted with the sisters. 

Be on the lookout for the "Great Pump- 
kins" that the Alpha Sigs are going to dis- 
tribute to each dorm. 



THE CALL — Clarion State College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



Friday, October 25, 1968 




DELTA ZETA 

Delta Zeta's Founder's Day was yestejfday' 
October 24. All the sisters and new pledges 
wore our colors, pink and green. Last night 
the DZ's attended the Founder's Day ban- 
quet held in the cafeteria. Many thanks to 
Linda Rockhill. social chairman, who was 
in charge of the banquet and did a great 
job. 

Apologies are extended to Susie McCarthy, 
whose name was omitted from the list of 
those girls recently initiated. 

Delta Zetas helped solicit for Red Cross 
on Wednesday night along with the other sor- 
orities. Pairs of girls were assigned a cer- 
tain area which they covered on foot. We 



Golden Eagles are Defeated Eagle Band to Perform at California 

in Tight Defensive Battle 



Last Saturday Clarion's Golden Eagles 
were defeated, 1813, by the Indians of In- 
diana in a tight defensive battle. Indiana, 
who was ranked number six in small colleges 
nationally, was stunned by the Golden Eagle 
defense. 

In the first half, the Clarion defense stopped 
the Indians six times before the Indians 
scored on a 25-yard field goal by Bob Tate. 
Clarion's defensive line gave up only 54 yards 
rushing and 59 yards in the air. The Indians 
fumbled four times in the first half and Cla- 
rion recovered two of them, but were unable 
to move the ball. The Clarion offense in 
the first half was stopped by an equally 
fierce Indiana defense. The score as the 
teams went into the locker rooms at half- 
time was Indiana 3, Clarion 0. 

In the third quarter, Clarion's offense start- 
ed moving after the defense provided them 
with the ball via two interceptions. The first 
interception was by Fran Sirianni on the In- 
diana 47-yard line. The Golden Eagles drove 
to the Indiana 29-yard line where a fumble 
stopped them. 

Four plays later, Tom Humphrey inter- 
cepted another Blucas pass at the Clarion 
40-yard line and returned it 20 yards to the 
Indiana 40-yard line. In 11 plays, Clarion 
drove in for the score on a three-yard pass 
from Bob Erdeljac to Jim Becker. John Dor- 
ish missed his first extra point of the season 
and Clarion led 6 to 3. Clarion's defense, 
after the kickoff, tightened and forced In- 
diana to punt. Clarion started their 80-yard 
drive, ending in a spectacular 39-yard touch- 
down pass from Erdeljac to Becker on the 
last play of the third quarter. John Dorish 
then kicked the extra point. 

Indiana came back in the fourth quarter 
with two touchdowns. Wally Blucas threw 
to Dave Smith for four yards and a touch- 
down, capping a 73-yard drive. Smith scored 
a two-point conversion. The score was Garion 
13, Indiana 11. 

After the kickoff. Clarion was forced to 
give up the ball to Indiana on the Clarion 
44-yard line after Clarion failed to make a 
first down. Indiana then drove the 44 yards 
in seven plays with Blucas running the last 



Football Team 
To California 
For Big Game 

Clarion State's Saturday clash with Cali- 
fornia State at their Homecoming could well 
be the sternest test of the season for the 
men of Jacks. 

Now in first place with Shippensburg in 
the second slot, a win over the Golden Eagles 
would clinch the Western Conference PSCAC 
title for the Vulcans. They are now 4-1 overall 
and 3-0 in conference play. 

Coach Bill Hepner's lads have bowed only 
to Waynesburg this season, and that by a 
narrow 27-26 margin. They have disposed 
of Dennison University, 36-0; Lock Haven, 
27-26; Slippery Rock, 42-6, and Shippensburg, 
30-14. 

"California State has a very offensive-mind- 
ed team, and are presently co-favorites with 
Shippensburg to win the Western Conference 
crown," commented Coach Al Jacks. 

"The Vulcans have good size, speed, ag- 
gressiveness and have earned the respect 
of the entire conference." 

With eight seniors, two juniors and one so- 
phomore in their offense, the Vulcans have 
basically the same team as last year, when 
they posted a 5-3 mark. Two fine seniors 
on the defense and 22 lettermen overall round 
them out as a formidable foe. 

Stellar Jeff Petrucci, number one quarter- 
back in the nation last year in total offense 
and currently ranking third in the NCAA 
rating, is the man to watch for the Vulcans. 
Last week the flashy Charleroi youngster 
piled up 105 yards in seven tries. He has 
made 13 TD tosses so far this season. 

Hepner has a top receiver in Pete Gial- 
ames, another Charleroi senior with seven 
TD passes received and high school class- 
mate of Petrucci. 

Al Jacks expects his charges to be on 
the upswing after last week's loss to Indiana. 
The Eagles are not especially plagued by 
injuries at this time. 

Clarion's mentor is basing his hopes on 
the solid arm of Bob Erdeljac, the running 
of Bob Oberdorf whose sprained ankle is 
nearly healed, as well as the heads-up play 
of wingback Jim Becker, linebackers Elmer 
Schuetz, Art Tragesser, Art Triveri, and a 
host of fine defensive players who have made 
the Golden Eagles a force to be reckoned 
with in 1968. 

It's a crucial contest, but it wouldn't be 
wise to count the Eagles out of the Western 
Conference race just yet. Wins over Cali- 
fornia and Shippensburg, the meat of the 
conference, would bring home the bacon for 
the Jacksmen. A win over the Vulcans and 
a loss to Shippensburg would still give the 
title to California, a week later. 

A 12:05 p.m. Homecoming parade in Cali- 
fornia will delay the kickoff Saturday until 
2:15 p.m. 



hope the contributions were tremendous and 
the drive was a success. 

Delta Zetas would like to extend their 
thanks to all the fraternities at whose smok- 
ers they were asked to hostess and sing. 
It was our pleasure. 



)o yards for the touchdown with 5:44 left 
in the game. Tate kicked the extra point, 
making the score Indiana 18, Clarion 13. 

Clarion, still in the game, made two more 
attempts to win, but when an Erdeljac pass 
was intercepted, Indiana seemed to have the 
game won. Again the Clarion defense stiffen- 
ed and forced Indiana to punt. Clarion took 
over on its own 22-yard line with less than 
a minute to play in the game. They drove 
down to the Indiana 25-yard line on the 
strength of Erdeijac's arm before the final 
gun sounded. With a few more breaks, the 
Indians could have been scalped. 

Clarion (ravels to California tomorrow to 
battle the Vulcans in what shapes up !• be 
the game for the Western Conference cham- 
pionship. California defeated Shippensburg, 
30-14, last Saturday to remain the only other 
undefeated team in the Western Conference. 

California has been flying high on the arm 
of Jeff Petrucci, who led the nation in pass- 
ing last year. Remember, Eagles, we have 
a date with East Stroudsburg on November 
16; let's keep it. 

GAME STATISTICS 



Clarion's Golden Eagle Marching Band will 
be traveling to California State College for 
the' Qation-California game on Saturday. 

The band will participate in the California 
State College Homecoming Parade, and also 
wiH present a pre-game show consisting of 
the "Star-Spangled Banner," and the Clarion 
State "Alma Mater." 

The half-time show for this game will fea- 



ture the Clarion majorettes doing a routine, 
complete with cowboy hats and pLstols, to 
the music of the "Gunsmoke" theme. Cortez 
Puryear, Clarion's drum major, will again 
captain the band. 

With three games remaining in the foot- 
ball season. Dr. Michalski is now looking 
toward the organization of concert band. The 
first rehearsal was held Monday afternoon. 



Clarion 




Indiana 


12 


Total First Downs 


15 


144 


Net Yards Rushing 


166 


26 


Passes Attempted 


25 


12 


Passes Completed 


10 


2 


Interceptions 


2 


161 


Passing Yardage 


123 


305 


Total Yardage 


289 


Z 


Fumbles 


4 


I 


Fumbles Lost 


■ t 


Penalties 


6 


48 

•1 


Yards Penalized 


28 


SCORE BY QUARTERS 




Indiana . 


.; 3 


15—18 


Clarion . 





13 0—13 



USE YOUR STUDENT DISCOUNT CARD 
AND SAVE AT 

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Dry Cleaner and 4-Hour 

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MAIN STREET 



CLARION 



SCORING 

, Indiana: Tate— 25-yard field goal. 

, Clariwi: Becker— 3-yard pass (Dorish kick, 

no good). 

Clarion: Becker— 39-yard pass (Dorish 
kick). 

Indiana: Smith— 4-yard pass (Blucas to 
Smith, 2 points). 
, Indiana: Blucas— 10-yard run (Tate kick). 



THE CALL NEEDS 

I Students, teachers, housemothers, and 
I anyone else who has copies of last year's 
CALL: We need copies of two of last year's 
issues: - 

No. 6, dated October 28, 1967, and No. 23, 
dated April 27, 1968. 

If you have a copy of one or both of these 
issues, please telephone the CALL office, 
extension 278, or leave a note in the mail- 
box on the front of the CALL office in Har- 
vey Hail. We need copies of these two is- 
sues to complete our files. 

—The Editor 



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Vol. 40, No. 6 



CLARION STATE COLLEGE — CLARION, PENNSYLVANIA 



Friday, November 1. 1968 




Mrs. Kathleen Gemmell Piatt 



IN COLLEGE CHAPEL 



OPINION POLL 



CSC Students Tell Problems 
Of Chandler Dining Hall Ruling 



By ROSEMARY SLEBODNIK 



Returning to issues of local import, our 
opinion poll for this week concerns Chandler 
Dining Hall. The question was: "What 15 
your reaction to the section of the rules gover- 
ning our housing contract which states: 'All 
students living in residence halls are required 
to eat in college-supervised dining halls'?" 

Tricia Burrows: "I think it is unfair to 
many students financially. Because of my 
own schedule conflicts, I can only eat one 
lunch a week in the dining hall. We should 
have the right to choose where and what 
we want to eat, and how much we want 
to spend on food. We figured it out, and 
a student does save money — if he eats every 
meal in the cafeteria. Otherwise, it is a finan- 
cial loss to buy a meal ticket." 

Linda Davison: "I think it is a waste of 
time and money. Most of the time, menus 
aren't appetizing, and force many students 
to spend more money on food elsewhere. 
I think we should be able to choose whether 
or not to eat all, or just some meals, and 
whether to eat week days or weekends. If 
given the choice, I'd eat elsewhere." 

Becky Dixon, who lives in Jefferson Hall, 
explains why many Jefferson residents disap- 
prove of the rule: "I don't think we should 
have to pay the food service fees, because 
half of the students don't eat there anyway 
— especially in off-campus dorms. I've lived 
in Jefferson for two years, and in the winter, 
when the weather is bad, many times we 
don't feel like going to supper. So I'm not 
getting the full benefit of the meal ticket." 

Brian Dubovsky appears to be dissatisfied 
with the food choices in our dining hall: 
"I don't think this should be a rule. It could 
be an option. Many times you don't have 
much choice of what you're going to eat. 
Many times they will run out of one choice 
of food at a meal, which I think is unfair, 
I don't Uke not being allowed to go back 
for 'seconds' at supper, since most of the 
time Ihey don't give you enough to eat — but 
then, most of the time it isn't worth eating 
anyway." 

Suzi Albanesi disagrees with the rule be- 
cause of its irrelevance to our presence here: 
"It is the student who chooses this college 
as a place to learn. He is not commissioned 
to be here by any person or group of per- 
sons. Therefore, it should be his choice where 
he wants to eat. Eating habits are irrele- 



vant to education and learning. I think this 
rule was made for the purpose of making 
rules and creating more problems, to create 
more committees." 

Though many criticized, only some could 
offer suggestions. These are some sugges- 
tions: Frank Becker: "I don't think it is 
a good policy thai all residents must buy 
a meal ticket. If college-operated dorms had 
this rule, it would be different, because you 
can choose your dorm. In private dorms, 
it should not be mandatory." 

Kathy Byrne: "I think we should be able 
to buy a meal ticket for a designated num- 
ber of meals, which could be punched or 
checked, because very few people eat all 
meals in the cafeteria." 

Since no students are exempt from eating 
in the cafeteria this semester for "medical 
reasons" (it was explained to them that the 
cafeteria could fulfill their needs better than 
any place in town), it .should be Expected 
that the dining hall would provide good, eas- 
ily-digested food. Ralph Conte claims that 
the food is bad for his digestion (and for 
many other students' digestion), because it 
is not prepared properly. The selections are 
all too often too greasy or too starchy. 

Ford Shankle has expressed sound reasons 
why this rule should lemain in effect: 
"Wouldn't it be chaotic if everybody went 
downtown to eat'.' There are just too many 
students for the facilities this town offers. 
Plus, what would happen to our multi-mil- 
lion dollar dining hall? Actually, it's a lot 
more convenient for me to go to the dining 
hall than to go downtown to eat." 

These, then, are some- of the major argu- 
ments for and against the present ruling: 
Pro: the lack of facilities elsewhere in Cla- 
rion, the proximity of the dining hall to most 
dorms, the inexpensive, yet filling meals ($9 
a week), and the fact that many students 
(face it) are not competent enough to get 
their own meals. Con: lack of selection, the 
"miss-meal" factor (Servomation receives a 
flat rate from each student, whether or not 
he eats every meal) and the desire for free- 
dom from such an obligation. 

Obviously, Servomation cannot hope to sat- 
isfy all students, but it is our desire that 
a system more satisfactory to more students 
be devised. 



Kathleen Suzanne Gemmell 
Weds Eugene Robert Piatt 



Miss Kathleen Suzanne Gemmell and Mr. 
Eugene Robert Piatt were married at seven 
p.m. last Saturday, in a double-ring Episco- 
pal ceremony at the College Chapel. The 
bride is the daughter of Dr. James Gem- 
mell, college president, and Mrs. Gemmell. 
The groom is the son of Mrs. Paul Calhoun 
Piatt and the late Mr. Piatt of 827 Cleans 
Road, Charleston, South Carolina. 

Depicts Scottish Theme 

The wedding was the first to be held in 
the College Chapel in twenty-five years. In 
keeping with the Scottish ancestry of both 
the bride and groom, a number of traditional 
Scottish customs were observed. The Chapel 
was decorated with white heather, yellow and 
burgundy mums, and laurel greens, reflect- 
ing the colors of the Ancient MacMillan tar- 
tan worn by the clan Irom which the groom 
is descended. Across her wedding gown, the 
bride wore an evening sash of the MacMillan 
tartan, fastened at the waist by a silver 
Lachenbooth brooch, the traditional gift of 
the groom to his fiancee at the time of en- 
gagement. 

The bride's full-length gown was of ivory 
silk peau de soie with a high scoop neckline 
defined by a wide ruffle, and dipped to a low 
back scoop. An attached train was framed 
with the wide ruffle motif and complemented 
the ruffled long sleeves. An ivory illusion 
veil with blusher caught by a bow of the 
gown's fabric completed the costume. The 
bride carried a cascade arrangement of 
white daisies, stephanotis, babies'-breath, 
and trailing ivy, with a gardenia center. 

Carried Yellow Mums 

The maid of hdfeor was the bride's cousin. 
Miss Nancy J. Segebarth of Washington, D. 
C. The bridesmaids were Miss Judith Helene 
Alexander, Miss Patricia Suzanne Caldwell, 
and Mrs. Robert Weisenbach, all of Wash- 
ington, D. C. ; Miss C. Diane Fry, of Chicago, 
Illinois, and Mrs. Thomas Hoeffner, of Hor- 
nell. New York. The bride's attendants were 
all attired in long drindl skirts of soft wool 
in the Ancient MacMillan plaid. Their blouses 
were of ivory crepe, with high ruffled collars 
and long ruffled sleeves. They wore velvet 
bows complementing the tartan in their 
hair, and carried arm t>ouquets of yellow 
mums and babies'-breath. The maid of honor 
carried yellow and burgundy mums. 

Employed by Navy Department 

The best man was Mr. John Pennington 
Simpson of Washington, D. C. Serving as 
ushers were Messrs. Timothy Taylor Kay 
Spadafora of Washington, D. C. ; Robert Wil- 
liam Frasch, of Rochester, New York; Her- 
man Mac Felder, III, of Winston Salem, 
North Carolina, and the bride's brothers, 
James Christopher and Ted K. Gemmell, of 
Clarion, Pennsylvania. The groom and 
groomsmen were attired in formal evening 
wear. The groom's boutonniere was a sprig 
of stephanotis, and the groomsmen wore gar- 
denias. 

The service was conducted by Father Don- 
ald J. Monson of Saint Paul's Episcopal 
Church in Washington, D. C. He was assisted 



Dean Impressed 
By Student Ideas, 
High Standards 

Mrs. Ethel Vairo, one of the new assistant 
deans of student affairs, will be chiefly con- 
cerned with handling social affairs, but she 
will also be available for counciling and gui- 
dance. 

Mrs. Vairo was born in Painted Post, New 
York. She did her undergraduate work at 
Lock Haven State College, where she was 
active in dramatics, debating, and journal- 
ism. She was also a member of Alpha Psi 
Omega, Kappa Delta Pi, and Sigma Sigma 
Sigma. She has taught English at several 
high schools and has served as a cooperating 
teacher for student teachers from Lock Ha- 
ven. 

During her residence in Philadelphia. Mrs. 
Vairo was involved in social group work and 
received her Master of Education degree 
from Temple University. She received gui- 
dance certification from Bucknell University 
and has completed three years of .study to- 
ward her doctorate. Prior to her arrival at 
Clarion, Mrs. Vairo was assistant dean of 
women at Lock Haven. 

The new dean is ver>' interested in making 
instruction in bridge available to students. 
She has participated in many area and re- 
gional tournaments and hopes to see a bridge 
team started at Clarion. 

Mrs. Vairo is enthusiastic about her work 
here and is impressed with the progressive 
ideas and high standards at this campus. 



by Father L. Paul Woodrum of the Church of 
Our Father. Foxburg Chapel, Foxburg, Penn- 
sylvania. Father Woodrum is also a member 
of Campus Ministry at Clarion State College. 
Also assisting in the service were acolytes 
William Eggbeer and James Anderson of 
Washington, D. C. Music for the ceremony 
was provided by the organist, Mr. William 
David Powell of Columbia, South Carolina, 
and the Madrigal Singers, a group of twenty- 
four singers from the college, under the dir- 
ection of Mr. William MacDonald. 

The bride is a graduate of Denison Univer- 
sity, Granville, Ohio, where she was a mem- 
ber of the Alpha Omicron Pi sorority. She is 
completing graduate work at American Uni- 
versity, and is employed by the Office of 
Federal Programs, American Association of 
State Colleges and Universities, in Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

The groom attended the public schools of 
St. Andrew's Parish, served for three years 
in the U. S. Army in Germany, and gradu- 
ated from the University of South Carolina, 
where he was a member of Kappa Sigma 
fraternity. He has had graduate work at 
Wake Forest and Catholic University. He is 
presently employed by the Department of the 
Navy in Washington. D. C. 

The mother of the bride wore a matching 
dress and coat costume of woven gold and 
beige metallic c'oth with coordinated acces- 
sories. The groom's mother wore a dress of 
light blue lace over taffeta with matching 
accessories. Both of the mothers wore gar- 
denia and stephanotis corsages. 

Following the wedding, the Scottish theme 
was extended to the decor at a reception in 
the bride's home and the dinner for 200 
guests at Chandler Hall. Music for the din- 
ner was provided by Mr. Robert Ford of 
Oil City, and guests were entertained by Mr. 
Robert Leslie of Ridgway, who played bag- 
pipes. Out of town guests were present from 
Charleston and Columbia, South Carolina, 
North Carolina, New York, Washington, D. 
C, Virginia, Ohio, Michigan, and Illinois. 

Among the pre-nuptial affairs were a va- 
riety shower given by Miss Carol Vargo and 
a dinner to honor the bride and groom by 
Messrs. Corcoran, McCowin and Waldron, all 
of Washington, D. C. 



Coming Events 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1 

—Wrestling Clinic, Gym, 6 p.m. 

—Alpha Gamma Phi - Theta Xi Dance, fea- 
turing the "Charades," Chandler, 9-12 
p.m. 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2 

—Wrestling Clinic, Gym, 9 a.m. 

—Football: Clarion vs. Shippensburg, Col- 
lege Memorial Stadium, 1:30 p.m. 

—Cross Country: State College Meet, West 
Chester 

—Halloween Dance, Chandler, 8:30 p.m. 

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3 

—Movie: "Playboy of the Western World," 
Chapel, 8 p.m. 

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 4 

—Freshman Football: Clarion vs. Edin- 
boro. College Memorial Stadium, 2:30 
p.m. 

—Concert: Nikhil Banerjee, sitar player, 
and his group. Chapel, 8:30 p.m. 

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5 

—Quarterback Club Dinner, Chandler, at 
6:30 p.m. 

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6 

—CSC Symphony Orchestra Concert, Gym, 
8 p.m. 




PROUDFIT PLANS FOR CSC 



Clarion State Establishes 
Conservation Ed. Center 



Plans for Clarion State College's proposed 
Conservation Education Center moved ahead 
recently when committee members made an 
on-site inspection of the 200-acre tract ad- 
joining the new 5,000-acre Sandy Lake State 
Park now under construction. 

Byron Ashbaugh. associate director of the 
National Audobon Society, met with a nine 
member faculty committee and others from 
the college in a pre-inspection orientation 
session at nearby Lakeview Inn. A coffee 
hour preceded the orientation. The half-day 
session concluded with luncheon. 

Ashbaugh, a former Clarion resident and 
graduate of Clarion State College, told the 
group the site is ideally suited for outdoor 
educatioK and congratulated the group for 
its foresight in planning the center which 
will be the first of its kind in the state. 
He explained a diagram .showing various ele- 
ments making up a conservation program. 

Dr. David Hilton, in charge of construction 
for the project, presented a probable time- 
table for development of the facility, noting 
that occupancy by using organizations is 
some two and one-half years avvay. 

Dormitory-classroom units, accommodating 
study groups of 100 or less at a time will 
be built on the tract which includes the old 
Rocky Basin Park. The Center program, to 



be planned by the committee, will include 
activities for students from kindergarten 
through college level. 

Dining, conference and maintenance facil- 
ities in addition to homes for a resident di- 
rector and caretaker will be built to adminis- 
ter the facility, which is a part of Clarion 
State College, hut will provide outdoor edu- 
cation services to public schools, colleges 
and universities in a wide area of Western 
Pennsylvania. 

Committee members present were Chair- 
man Harold Simmons, dean of professional 
studies; Dr. Gustav Konitzky, anthropology; 
Dr. William Chamberlain, science education- 
biology; Donald Leas, health, physical edu- 
cation and recreation; Dr. John McLain, Cen- 
ter for Educational Research; Galen Ober, 
physical science; Joseph Spencc. fine arts; 
Dr. Don Totten, geography, and Dr. Arnold 
Zaeske, elementary education. 

Otners in attendance were Dr. Hilton, as- 
.sistant to the president; Mrs. Samuel Wil- 
helm, president of the Clarion County Fed- 
eration of Women's Clubs and its forrrer 
conservation chairman; Messrs. William Eck- 
les, R. K. Thompson and Dominic Palombo, 
architects; William Proudfit, college informa- 
tion specialist, and Howard Barger, college 
photographer. 




Committee Members Discuss Plans For New Conservation Center 



McDonald^ Cor belt Assisting Speech 



Bill McDonald and Chuck Corbett, both 
working toward the master of education de- 
gree in speech pathology and audiology, are 
graduate assistants in speech and hearing 
work. They assist the instructors and do clin- 
ical research in addition to working on their 
degrees. 

Mr. McDonald is a 1958 graduate of Clarion 
where he majored in English and social stu- 
dies. Following graduation he was an elemen- 
tary teacher in the Cameron County Schools 
and a supply analyst at the United States 
Navy Depot in Mechanicsburg. Mr. McDon- 
ald's hometown is Phillipsburg and he hopes 
to work in that general area after he re- 



ceives his master's degree, perhaps in a re- 
habilitation center which is planned for the 
near future. 

A native of Clarion, Mr. Corbett majored 
in speech pathology and audiology and grad- 
uated from CSC. in 1968. Before returning 
to work on his degree and as an assistant, 
Mr. Corbett was the speech therapist in the 
Clarion County Schools for one semester. At 
the moment, he hopes to enter clinical work 
after he earns his degree, but in no particular 
area of the state, "whatever looks favorable 
at the time." Mr. Corbett is married to the 
former Betsy Ross, who is employed by the 
Carlson Library. 



ETHEL VAIRO 



Senate Rules to 
Underwrite Events 



A special fund has been set up by the 
Student Senate for the purpose of aiding cam- 
pus organizations in sponsoring functions. 

The following has unanimously been ap- 
proved by the Social Committee of the Clarion 
Students' Association as the procedure by 
which any recognized campus organization 
must comply in order to have the Social 
Committee underwrite any contracts for or- 
ganization-sponsored social events that will 
be held on the campus for the entertainment 
of all students: 

1. The organization, desiring to have the 
Social Committee underwrite a concert, 
dance, movie or any other social activity, 
must send a erpresentative to a Social Com- 
mittee meeting with a requisition for the 
event, and must first have the date for the 
function approved by the Social Committee. 

2. The organization is then responsible for 
obtaining an approved facility where the func- 
tion is to be held, and must also be re- 
sponsible for requesting microphones, plat- 
forms, lights, or any other equipment that 
will be needed. 

3. The organization is completely responsi- 
ble for facility maintenance costs, security 
of and publicity for the activity. 

4. The Social Committee will consider each 
request for ticket prices on the organization's 
individual merit. 

5. The Social Committee will issue tickets 
by number and color to a specific organiza- 
tion for a specific event. The organization 
is responsible for selling the tickets and giv- 
ing a completed account of alt incomes and 
expenses to the Social Committee. 

6. The organization must complete a pur- 
chase request to cover the contract for the 
entertainment and have it signed by the So- 
cial Committee faculty advisor. The request 
must then be sent to the Business Manager 
of Clarion Students' Association, Mr. KUngen- 
smith. 

7. The Social Committee will assume a 
50 percent debt or a 25 percent profit for 
any event that they underwrite. 

8. If an organization has previously in- 
curred a loss, the Social Committee will de- 
cide whether or not they will underwrite a 
second (or another) contract. 

9. If an organization cannot pay a debt 
by the end of a semester, the organization 



will have until the end of the following semes- 
ter to repay the debt or the organization 
will not be able to have the Social Com- 
mittee underwrite any further contracts. .. 

Campus Mock 
Election Scheduled 

A mock election for the 1968 Presidential 
election will be sponsored by the Clarion Call 
staff and the Intercollegiate Conference on 
Government (ICG). By means of the election. 
Clarion students may obtain some idea of 
where they stand politically in comparison 
with the actual national results. 

A voting table will be set up in Chandler 
Hall on November 5, Election Day. The polls 
will be open from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. on 
Tuesday, and the results will be tabulated 
immediately following the election. 

Members of both the Call and the ICG will 
conduct the voting procedures. Anyone m ish- 
ing to help with this election should contact 
any member of either organization to obtain 
a work schedule. 

The results will be published in the Daily 
Bulletin on Wednesday morning and also in 
Friday's edition of the Call. 

All students are urged to vote in order to 
get a more accurate and representative tabu- 
lation. 



ALL-CAMPUS DANCE TO 
FEATURE 'CHARADES* 

The "Charades" will be featured in an 
all-campus dance in Chandler Hall at 9 
o'clock tonight, .^n admission price of 50 
cents will be charged at the door. 

The "Charades" are an allsoul group, 
which have been summoned due to student 
demands. A large turnout is anticipated by 
members of the social committee for this 
group. 

Dick Riddle, a member of the social 
committee, stated that this dance is an- 
other function that "the social committee 
is sponsoring to help bring better enter- 
tainment to this campus. For this reason 
all students are urged to attend this dance 
to show that they care about their activi- 
ties." 



Page 2 



Editorially 
Speaking 



On The Election . . . 



Next Tuesday, November 5th, the 
people of the United States of Ameri- 
ca will choose a president. This presi- 
dent, whoever he may be, will decide 
the destiny of Ameriga and the entire 
woild for the next four years. His 
power and responsibilities will be awe- 
some. 

The President's foreign policy will 
decide whether the world will go on or 
become a desolate heap of nuclear 
ashes. It will also decide whether 
America will .stand free and powerful 
or succumb to the forces of world com- 
mun.om. The President's domestic 
policy will determine whether America 
will be a two-class nation of privileged 
and underprivileged citizens, or a na- 
tion of equal opportunity. And his eco- 
nomic policies will determine whether 
America will continue to prosper or 
sink into a depression such as this gen- 
eration has never seen. The life of ev- 
ery American from college student to 
Wall Street businessman will be deeply 
affected by the decisions that the next 
President makes. 

But in spite of the grave impor- 
tance attached to this man, a great 
number of Americans do not care who 
becomes President. The current per- 
centage of voters in American presi- 



dential elections is approximately sixty 
percent of the eligible electorate. The 
lemaining forty percent, it seems, care 
very little for their country or them- 
selves. They prefer to sit back and let 
their fellow citizens mjike all of the im- 
portant decisions for them. And un- 
fortunately, these decisions are not al- 
ways sound. 

Apathy of this type is extremely 
dangerous in a society such as we have 
in America. It is conceivable that a 
citizen who doesn't care whether a 
Humphrey or a Nixon is elected to the 
presidency, may not care whether a 
Rockwell or a Welch is elected. Al- 
though this may seem ridiculous, we 
have only to open our history books to 
the years 1932 through 1945 to see 
what can happen. As we know, a 
small group of people can control a 
nation and lead it into insanity. 

Many students at Clarion State 
College are eligible to vote. To these 
students, part of the responsibility 
fdlls. It is your duty as an American 
citizen to cast your ballot this Tuesday. 
Your entire future and the future of 
your children and your children's chil- 
dren may depend on it. 

— E. G. W. 



Visiting Privileges Requested 



Hours for the women students 
were extended this semester. There- 
foie, students now have more tiniE'tind 
more oppoitunities to participate in 
activities which are centered outside 
the dormitorv. However, two impor- 
tant facilities on this campus have not 
conformed with the changed hours, 
and continue to close at both inade- 
quate and inconvenient times. 

These two facilities are the library 
and the student union. Both are key 
centers for students who want to study 
or socialize in the evenings. However, 
as the hours now stand, students are 
forced to leave these places at a rela- 
tively unreasonable hour. 

The library now .closes at 10 p.m. 
which is not adequate^ for the students' 
needs. It is generally known that most 
students study late it^ the evening be- 
cause other obligations prevent earlier 
se.ssions. But since the library closes 
so early, many students fail to com- 
plete a.ssignments on time; others are 
rushed and consequently end up doing 
sub-average work. 

Another argument for extending 
the library hours revolves around com- 
m u t e r s and off-campus residents. 
These students must often walk or 
drive considerable distances to get to 
the library, and feel that the journey 



is not worth their effort if they are to 
be turned away so soon. As a result, 
these students often are deprived of 
the library facilities that they are as 
much entitled to as the resident stu- 
dents. 

The student union is also guilty 
of following outdated standards. The 
union is the only place on campus that 
the students can meet, enjoy music, 
ahd buy refreshments. For this rea- 
spn, the union is important; students 
appreciate having a place to go and a 
place to socialize. 

If women students can stay out 
until 2:00 a.m. on weekends, why 
shouldn't they be able to spend more 
tftne in the union? Often a girl and 
her date enjoy being in the union 
where they can talk and keep company 
wiith friends. In fact, this is often the 
ohly place to go on campus. But since 
the union closes its doors at 12:00 on 
Friday and Saturday, all students must 
leave, and those that have no other 
place to go must return to the dorm. 

Many students would readily ap- 
preciate an extension of hours in both 
the library and the union. This being 
the case, why shouldn't steps be taken 
to have these changes made? 

— C. W. 



The Clarion Call 



CALL Office, Room 7, llartpy Hall 
Clarion Slate College, Clarion, Penna. 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Carolyn Welesko 

BUSINESS MANAGER Tom Smith 

NEWS EDITOR Sandy Diesel 

FEATURE EDITOR Sue Fair 

COPY EDITOR Rosemary Slebodnik 

EXCHANGE EDITOR Peg Foley 

CO SPORT.S EDITORS Dennis Morrow, Gary Andres 
STAFF MEMBERS Elizabeth Curley, Margaret Beierle, 
Ann Rohrbaugh, Ed Wozniak, Gary Daurora. Larry Carter, 
Georgana Winters, Linda Sonnenfeld. Owen Winters, Dianna 
Cherry, Larilyn Andre, Dick Mears. Bob Toth, Jerry Zary, 
Nancy Sarginger, Judy Summy, Linda Pifer, Kathy .Jones 
ADVISOR Richard K. Redfern 



PNPA' 



PSirWSTlVAlU 
IHW8PAPBR 
POBlISHEftS' 
A880CUSI0I 



l.^jiT^n 



THE CALL -- Clarion State College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 




LEHER TO 
THE EDITOR 



Editor, The Call: 

In the October 25 issue of the Call, Clarion 
.students were subjected to an editorial tirade 
criticizing the student body for failure to 
support campus-sponsored social activities. 
Granted, this is indeed a rtorthwhile concern 
on our campus. But I think the impact of 
that editorial was lost amidst the baseless 
invectives which were aimed .at the student 
body. 

In the October 4 issue, the Call outlined 
its "goal for higher journalistic standards." 
In explaining these standards, it was pointed 
out that "the purpose of any paper is to in- 
form the public of what is happening — here 
on campus, or anywhere that news is made. 
As far as we know, 'facts, facts, facts' are 
the only efficient way to transfer news." Un- 
fortunately, last Friday's editorial was writ- 
ten with absolutely no consideration fot the 
facts. We were told that "these same stu- 
dents who do not attend social functions, 
are the very ones who complain about a 
lack of social activities ... the first to blame 
the administration ... the first to criticize 
the activities that are planned, and Uiey are 
the first to condemn anything new that is 
tried." Even the least perceptive Clarion stu- 
dent can see that there is no basis for a gen- 
eralization like that. Editors, we are not com- 
plete idiots. The Call has come a long way 
since last year, but if this is to be continued, 
we must be able to expect you, above all, to 
adhere to the standards which yau have set 
for the rest of the student body. 

BILL KEHEW 



Fallen Pines 

% 

. Ir : 

Falling pines • 

upon thg old lawn 
and grass sharp and fresh 
in the evening. 

She goes on ' 

with her 
work 

and pretends it has 
not been. 

Falling pines, 

sweet turpentines 
That bother her, 
When the sun set 
She left them 

and went far into 
Another country 
and that was the end. ' 

FaUing pines, 

her fires cooled 
Him of other passions; 
one passion 

of dim softness, 
across the dream her slimness 
Strode 

but gave no answer. 

Falling pines 

Crossed her love 
But she forgave. 

It is night 

at last, and 
She learns of darkness. 

C. G. 



WRB Forms 
New Committee 
For Fall, 1968 

The Women's Residence Board organized a 
committee on sign-out procedures at the W. 
R. B. meeting, Tuesday evening. The mem- 
bers of the committee are Cathy Smith, 
Janet Kochin, Sue Pelino, and Bonnie Sie- 
piela. 

It is the purpose of the committee to in- 
vestigate the present sign-out system and to 
propose a new method of signing out. It will 
then be the duty of this committee to dralt 
a proposal to be presented to the W. R. B. 

The propo^al which is voted as acceotable 
by the Women's Residence Board will be 
presented to all women residents for ratifi- 
cation. If the proposal is ratified by the 
women residents, it will be offered to the 
deans of student affairs for approval. Upon 
approval by the deans, it will be given to 
President James Gemmell for signature. The 
proposal will go into effect after it has re- 
ceived President Gemmell's approval. 

The actual proposal will be read at the 
next Women's Residence Board meeting, to 
be held at 6:30 Tuesday in Room 251 of the 
Administration Building. The meeting will 
be open to all students. Women who would 
like to express their opinions may do so at 
this meeting. 

Alpha Mu Gamma 
Names Initiates 
For Fall, 1968 

Monday evening at 8, 30 new members 
were formally initiated into the Delta Lamb- 
da chapter of the Alpha Mu Gamma honorary 
language society. Presiding at the candlelight 
ceremony was George Trautman, president. 
He was assisted by Joyce Lackovich, vice 
president; Andrew Conway, secretary; Ken- 
neth Jancsar, treasurer; Nancy Bulger, his- 
torianf and Dr. Robert Bays, faculty advisor. 

Newly initiated members represent four 
language fields: French: Margaret Barth, Su- 
zann Heinricher. Lisabeth Horner, Mary Ann 
Lewandowski, Cathleen Orris, Barbara Peli- 
cap, and Judy Walcott. 

German: Pamela Grantham, Trina Lorah, 
Ed Morrison, Christine Nevel, and Charleen 
Pfann^fi Schmidt. 

Russian: Rosemary Slebodnik. 

Spanish: Bonnie Brannen, Patricia Bur- 
rows, Gary Clark, Joann Fulgenzi, Mike Ga- 
lek, Janet Gates, Jeannette Kuhn, Mary Bar- 
bara Madigan, Margaret Nemanic, Lynda Os- 
kin, Ruth Puskar, Muriel Rapich, Donna Sac- 
co, Donna Sopko, John Smaila, and Linda 
Weston. Mrs. Andree Simkins, a native of 
France, was initiated as a "foreign" student. 

Following the initiation, yearbook pictures 
were taken, and a business meeting was held. 

Tair Editors Attend 
New York Conference 

The Call editors and the Call advisor left 
yesterday for a collegiate press meeting in 
New York City. 

Carolyn Welesko, editor-in-chief, and Sandy 
Diesel, news editor, will attend the 44th an- 
nual Associated Collegiate Press Conference, 
which began yesterday and continues today 
and tomorrow at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel. 
Hichard K. Redfern, professor of English and 
i'»U advisor, is also attending the conference. 



Friday, November 1, 1968 



Myron Klingensmith Controls 
Clarion State Purse Strings 







MYRON KLINGENSMITH 

'J. B/ Presentation 
Evokes Discussion 

The first Clarion State College Readers 
"Theatre of the Mind" production, J. B., 
written by Archibald MacLeish, which was 
presented in the College Chapel Tuesday eve- 
ning, proved to be a stimulating experience 
for both readers and audience. 

The play is a modern version of the bibli- 
cal story of Job, who lost all his worldly 
poss'fcssions in a test of his faith in God. 
J.B., like Job. emerges from the ordeal a 
less self-centered man and a better human 
being. 

Members of the cast included: Steve Brez- 
zo in the role of J.B., Lorraine Martin as 
his wife, Sarah, Suzi Albanesi as their daugh- 
ter, Rebecca, Ken Miller as Zophar (J.B.'s 
conscience), and John Solomon as Zeus. 
George Hall played Nickles (Satan), and also 
did an outstanding job of directing. 

Adhering to the concept of the "Theatre 
of the Mind," the readers invited the audience 
to participate in an open discussion of the 
play, its interpretation, and its execution. 
The audience response was positive, and re- 
sulted in an hour's discussion of many ques- 
tions: "What caused Job's suffering?" "Were 
the implications of J.B. the same as in the 
original Old Testamifint story?", ",Was Mac- 
Leish advocating humanism or Christianity?" 
In spite of the length and depth of the dis- 
cussion only one conclusion was reached dur- 
ing the evening — J.B. wos a worthwhile pro- 
duction, and those who attended spent an 
evening that was intellectually enjoyable. 

The College Readers, under the supervision 
of Dr. Mary Hardwick, are scheduled to take 
their production of J.B. to the annual Oral 
Interpretative Reading Festival, next Friday 
and Saturday, at Temple University in Phil- 
adelphia. 

x4nnual Teacher Meeting 
To Take Place on Campus 

Approximately 360 teachers from 65 public 
school districts serving Clarion State College 
student teachers will attend the annual meet- 
ing of Cooperating Teachers at the college 
on Wednesday and Thursday. 

Coordinated by Dr. Ralph W. Sheriff, as- 
sistant director of Student Teaching, the Wed- 
nesday session will serve elementary teach- 
ers and those working in the areas of .special 
education and speech pathology. Secondary 
teachers and librarians will receive special 
attention on Thursday. 

The program is designed to acquaint the 
teachers, representing 18 counties serving the 
Clarion State student teaching program, with 
some facets of student teacher-cooperating 
teacher relationships considered significant 
by the college. 

Cooperating teachers from Clarion, Venan- 
go, Mercer, Forest, Elk, McKean, Jefferson, 
Clearfield, Armstrong. Butler, Lawrence, 
Beaver, Allegheny, Westmoreland, Cambria, 
Cameron, Crawford and Warren counties are 
expected to attend the sessions. 

Presiding at both sessions will be Dr. Wil- 
liam J. Page, director of student teaching 
and placement. Dr. James Gemmell, Clarion 
•State College president, will extend greetings 
on Wednesday. Dr. Harold E. Simmons, dean 
of professional studies, will greet the Thurs- 
day session. 

Dr. Joseph Zafforoni, professor of elemen- 
tary education at Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity and author of books on science for 
elementary teachers, will address the Wed- 
nesday morning session on "Science in the 
Elementary School. " 

Dr. Clyde Corle, professor of elementary 
education at Penn l^ate and author of books 
on modem mathematics, will speak to the 
afternoon session on "Mystery of Math or 
Mastery of Myth." 

Addressing secondary teachers and librar- 
ians the second day will Be Dr. Samuel Fran- 
cis, chairman of Secondary Education at the 
University of Pittsburgh. His subject will be 
"Rights and Responsibilities of Professional 
Employees." 

Group sessions in the subject areas of Eng- 
lish, foreign language, geography, mathcfna- 
tics, science, social studies, speech and lib- 
rary science will constitute the final sessicW 
Thursday afternoon. 



By SUE FAIR 

Since January 30, 1967, Myron Klingensmith 
has been the business manager of the Clarion 
Students Association. He has an oJfice ip 
the basement of the Administration Building, 
.vet many students are unaware of him and 
his duties. 

Originally from Leechburg, Mr. Klingen- 
smith is a graduate of the New Kensington 
Business School. For 32 years he worked 
for the AUegheny-Ludlum Steel Corporation, 
West Leechburg division, where he partici- 
pated in a three-year training course in Sys- 
tems, Procedures, and Supervision, sponsored 
by General Electric. 

In 195d, Mr. Klingensmith was appointed 
to the election board of Armstrong County 
for the state-wide teachers election, in which 
all teachers in Pennsylvania had to decide 
whether or not to integrate teacher retire- 
ment benefits with the social security pro- 
gram. For three years, he was a building 
inspector for the Pennsylvania State Building 
Authority within Armstrong County. 

Prepared For Job 

Mr. Klingensmith feels that the 16 years 
he spent on the School board in the Gilpin 
Town.ship and Leechburg Area Schools pre- 
pared him for his job at Clarion. Of those 
16 years, he served six years as secretary 
and seven as president. He came to Clarion 
in 1967 through Robert Nigro, business man- 
ager of Clarion State College. 

Mr. Klingensmith's duties and responsibili- 
ties as business manager of the Clarion Stu- 
dents Association are many. He must insure 
that all fees, dues, and assessments are con- 
trolled and accounted for; that all cash col- 
lected is reconciled to the student population 
to which it is applicable; that all cash sales 
in the bookstore and snackbar are properly 
accounted for and are recorded daily. In 
addition, there are records kept for vending 
machines sales, for publications, for ticket 
sales for all monetary items; in short, he 
must account for all funds of the Clarion 
Students Association. 

Approves Purchases 

He is the financial administrator of 40 cam- 
pus organizations; he must insure that all 
items purchased are properly authorized, ap- 
proved, and under budget control. He is noti- 
fied by an organization representative who 
fills out a purchase request form if the pur- 
chase is under $100; however, if the item 
wanted is over a $100 limit, Mr. Klingensmith 
must solicit bids from three companies and 
award the order to the lowest bidder. This 
usually involves only his largest accounts, es- 
pecially the athletic and music departments 
and the Social Committee. 

A major item for Mr. Klingensmith is the 
control of all funds allocated by the Student 
Senate. In the purchase of capital items, 
like the new chairs for the Student Union, 
the approval of President Gemmell and the 
business manager is necessary for the trans- 
fer of funds from the Student Union Improve- 
ment Fund to the Fee-supported Fund. In 
addition to this, all fixed assets on any capi- 
tal items must be accounted for, and each 
year, depreciation of value must be noted 
in the records. 

Handles Insufficient Funds Checks 

All cash and credit sales in the bookstore 
n\ust be recorded, accounted for, and de- 
posited. An important item, which Mr. Klin- 
gensmith also handles, is the checks cashed 
by the students in the bookstore which are 
returned to him marked insufficient funds. 
These checks are entered on the books and 
are turned over to Security, under Thaddeus 
Droast, who collects the money. Failure to 
pay results in the loss of the check-cashinij 
privilege in the bookstore. Grades are with- 
held only in the failure to pay activity fees 
or credit accounts. Mr. Klingensmith noted, 
however, that there are only a minimal 
amount of due bills and checks; the students 
take care of any mistakes in a short time 
after they are notified of their error. 

Mr. Klingensmith's duties are many; they 
involve much paperwork, many helpers, and 
careful records of the many activities of this 
campus. Each year, his books are audited 
by the State. He has assumed much responsi- 
bility and he handles his job efficiently. 

Symphony Orchestra 
To Feature Soloists 
In Initial Concert 

The Clarion State College Symphony Orch- 
estra, under the direction of Edward Ron- 
cone, will present a concert at 8 p.m. Wed- 
nesday in Tippin Gymnasium. The public is 
cordially invited and there is no admission 
charge for this event. 

The program for this concert will be: 

GLUCK— Overture, "Iphigenie en Aulide." 

VIVALDI— Concerto in A minor for two 
Violins and Orchestra; Lynne Mason and 
Nicolas Rutherford, soloists. 

STARER— Dalton Set. 

MENDELSSOHN— Concerto No. 1 in G 
minor for Piano and Orchestra; Jeanne Mat- 
lack, soloist. 

BARTOK— Rumanian Folk Dances. 

GIANNINI— Symphony No. 2. 

Featured in this concert are three student 
soloists: Lynne Mason and Nicolas Ruther- 
ford, violinists, and Jeanne Matlack, pianist. 

The symphony orchestra, now in its second 
year of operation, has been in rehearsal 
Sfnf§ the^'oegiiinfag of the academic year 
with more than 40 instnunentalists. 



^M*rt^**^««««tt*«fttt 



l«MMi 



J'.tWay, NovettOiw 1, 1969 



TII£ CALL — ' Clarion State College, Clarion, PennsyWniMi 



Paiie 3 



I A Peek At Greeks | ^^*'"^'^ f "^'"'' ^'f^'Z 



Debaters Score Win in Tournament 



\ 



AL#HA SIGMA TAU 

The sisters of Alpha Sigma Tau want to 
congratulate Si-sters Peggy Nemanic and 
Ruth Pushkar, who were both recently initi- 
ated as members of Alpha Mu Gamma, hon- 
orary foreign language fraternity. Ruth Push- 
kar, who is student teaching this semester, 
came up for the ceremony on Monday, Oc- 
tober 28. 

On Monday, October 28, pin pledging was 
held. Elections were held afterwards, and 
officers of the Fall pledge class are: presi- 
dent, Mary Ellen Milowicki; vice-president, 
.Cathy Stinard; secretary, Peggy Harding; 
(treasurer, Nancy Granberg; chaplain, Shar- 
on Fierst; junior Panhellenic representative, 
Nene Morella; and art chairman, Nancy 
Plese. 

We want to congratulate our "perennial 
pledge," Cindy AUtci, who is now a sister. 
Cindy was also initiated into AST on Mon- 
day, October 28. 

This weekend is Founders Day Weekend. 
Tonight, the sorority is having a hayride; 
tomorrow we're ushering at the last home 
game of the season against Shippensburg 
State; and on Sunday, the sorority will go 
to church as a group. On Monday, November 
4, AST Founders Day, we will have our an- 
nual dinner in Chandler Dining Hall. 

The members of this year's sextet are: 
Sue Graham, Carol Kahle, Cookie Morgan, 
Peggy Nemanic, Sue Paul, and Janet Peters. 

Belated congratulations go to Tana Fair- 
fax, treasurer of the Senior Class; Sue Paul, 
vice-president of the Junior CIrss; and Sue 
Graham and Carol Kahle, who were elected 
fire captain and referral board representa- 
tive, respectively, of Forest Manor North. 

DELTA ZETA 

Delta Zeta is very happy and proud to an- 
nounce its fall pledge class of 1968. They are: 
Kathy Kinley, president; Jan DeAugustino, 
secretary; Jan Lichtenbergcr, treasurer; Sue 
Bruce, junior Panhellenic representative; 
Sharon Campbell, song leader; Sharon Hol- 
leran, Linda Myers, Candy James, Carol 
Reifstoff, Leslie Freiburn, Sara Waugh, Lin- 
da Decapua, Debbie Carson, Donna Sacco, 
Kathy Pemazza, Marty Jupinko, and Sandy 
Hunt. 

The girls were ribboned at an informal 
ceremony on Monday, October 21. On Octo- 
ber 28, the girls were formally pledged at a 
Ceremony held at the home of Mrs. Crooks, 
one of our patronesses. Refreshments and 
some impromptu entertainment by our sev- 
enteen new pledges followed the ceremony. 

TAU KAPPA EPSILON 

Our pledges for this semester are: Greg 
Schleeper, president; John Schellinberger, se- 
cretary. Rich Gensel, treasurer; Randy Mc- 
Near, Bob Hoffer, Nick DeMartino, Jerry 
Gasperini, Steve Baum, Larry Moyer, Ray 
Qrzulak, Gem Ingram, Jim Kypta, Ron Col- 
on, and Jim Orr. 

Congratulations are extended to Brother 
Steve Pohlit, who was recently lavaliered to 
Nancy Walcott, and Brother John Keough, 
who was lavaliered to Carrie McCall. 

ZETA TAU ALPHA 

The Zetas proudly announce their pledge 
class for the tall of 1968: Mary Joyce Kapp, 
Cathy Faust, Bobbi Egidi, Judy Drab, Cathy 
Clondon, Carmella FuciUo, Barb Verish, Ruth 
Uodson, Betty Ferguson, Linda Laudermilch, 
Kerry McCall, Sara Cox, Luba Muzyka, Janet 
Steis, Bev Lechner, and Mary Tassotti. Zeta 
love and white violets to our future sisters. 

The best of luck to our sister Judy Kara- 
binos, an alumna who recently entered the 
United States Air Force. 

PHI SIGMA EPSILON 

The brothers of the Phi Sigma Epsilon wish 
to compliment the Golden Eagles football 
team on a game well played against Cali- 
fornia State, even if it was a losing effort. 
Good luck against Shippensburg tomorrow! 

Congratulations to brother Eddie Carr, who 



was recently pinned to Sandra Harrison of 
CSC. 

The brothers are proud to announce a new 
pledge class for the fall semester with their 
big brothers. They are Jack Inskip (Gene 
Herritt); Brian Dubovsky (Bill Jones); Harry 
Roberts (Dick Mears); Denny Dixon (Larry 
Stiner); Tom Abaray (Ray Costello); Bob 
Culp (Tom Haggett); Chuck Huffman (Tom 
Seng); Bill Nassis (Art Triveri); Terry Kirk- 
wood (Bob Oberdorf); and Dave Potter (Bill 
Pa ff rath). 

Students from CSC who traveled to Cali- 
fornia to see the game last weekend noticed 
that the Phi Sig cannon made it also, thanks 
to Larry Henry and the new pledges, who 
volunteered to ride in the back of the truck. 

Brother Bill Paffrath is to be commended 
for his donation of a pint of blood to the 
Red Cross Bloodmobile, which visited the 
campus October 22. 

The pledges have begun selling chances for 
a raffle which will be carried on for all 
students until after Thanksgiving. Anyone 
wishing to purchase a chance should see 
one of the pledges. 

THETA CHI 

We, the brothers of Theta Chi, give Al 
Jacks' forces our full support in the game 
tonvorrow against Shippensburg. 

The Chi activity list reads something like 
this for the weekend: Friday night, stag 
party; Saturday night, Halloween party; 
Sunday afternoon. Brothers vs. Pledges foot- 
ball game at Toby Hill. 

PHI SIGMA KAPPA 

Phi Sigma Kappa again announces a fine 
fall roster of pledges: Bernie Pasqualini, Jim 
Young, John Cametti, "Butch" Minick, Dave 
Czlonka, and John Layman. 

The Brotherhood offers its condolences to 
Brother Jim Younkins, our intramural half- 
back, who sustained a broken clavicle in last 
week's game. 

With the approach of payoffs, the Kappas 
have shown an outstanding record on the 
gridiron with a 4-1 record so far. The feeling 
is that this year may see Phi Sigma Kappa 
clench the intramural title. 

A special kudo goes to Brother Ron Zeraf- 
sky of Mu chapter at the University of Penn- 
sylvania for taking a silver medal in the 
diving competition at the 1968 Olympics in 
Mexico City. 

Bryce Heasley and Jim Pratt have announ- 
ced their intention to join the rifle team. 

To the football team, the best of luck in 
Saturdiy's game against the Shippensburg 
Red Raiders. 

SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA 

Congratulations to oiu* new pledges: Jan 
Gorencik, Elaine Debiak, Peggy Ward, Pam 
Tylwalk, Kathy Head, Kathy Burgeson, Carol 

Shugarts, Sue Pelino, and Rita Roper. 

Students to Present Plays 

Continuing the series of studio productions, 
the directing class will present two one-act 
plays at 7:30 tonight. 

The first play will be lonesco s Chairs, dir- 
ected by Herb Michaels. In the cast are 
CeCe Carter and Bob Heimann. 

The second production of the evening will 
be Rodale's The Hairy Falsetto, directed by 
John Dorish. The cast includes Rosebud 
Slebodnik, Raine Martin, Dan Speal, Jim 
Jones, and Chuck Matsko. 

Students and faculty alike are invited to 
tonight's performance and also next Thurs- 
day's productions, which have not yet been 
announced. 



Passes Away at Age 79 



ARMS TALKS AND TREATY 

Under Secretary of State Nicholas Katzen- 
bach has reported that approval in the United 
Nations of the draft treaty for preventing 
the spread of nuclear weapons could have 
a favorable effect on negotiations for further 
curbs on the arms race. 



FUTURE FLICKS 



Continuing its run at the Garby Theater 
tonight and tomorrow is Live a Little, Love a 
little, an Elvis Presley movie. Tomorrow 
and Sunday afternoon will be the matinee 
showings of the superhero thriller, Superargo 
is. Diabolicus, and the cartoon western, The 
Man from Button Willow. Starting Sunday 
evening will be For Singles Only, which de- 
picts life in a community catering to unmar- 
ried young people imder thirty. This will con- 
tinue until Wednesday when bargain night 
will feature Where Were YOU When tbe 
Lights Went Out?, a Doris Day movie ex- 
ploiting New York's 1965 power failure. 

Coming to the Garby for matinee perform- 
ances only November 9 and 10 will be The 



Gospel According to Saint Matthew. It is one 

of the most unconventional and successful 
biblical movies ever made. The movie de- 
picts the Christ who says, "I come not to 
send peace, but a sword," and who calls his 
contemporaries "a generation of vipers." 
This movie succeeds in giving Christ's life a 
meaning in today's world. 

Meanwhile, at the Orpheum, Leonard Bern- 
stein's classic musical. West Side Story, will 
continue until tomorrow night. A Lovely Way 
to Di«, starring Kirk Douglas, will run from 
Sunday to Tuesday. Bargain night this week 
at the Orpheum will be The Devil's Brigade, 
starring William Holden. 



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Funeral services for Miss Bertha Nair, re- 
tired English professor at Clarion State Col- 
lege, were held recently in Clarion. She died 
at the age of 79 in Allegheny Genial Hos- 
pital, Pittsburgh, on October 5. 

A graduate of Beaver Falls High School, 
Miss Nair received her bachelor's degree 
at Westminster College and her master's at 
the University of Pittsburgh. She did addi- 
tional graduate work at Harvard, the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, and the University of 
southern California. Among the schools where 
she taught in her 45-year teaching career 
are; Hickory Township High School in Sharon 
and Mount Oliver High School in Pittsburgh. 

An active member of the College Faculty 
Club, and the Association of University Wo- 
men and Faculty Women, Miss Nair found 
time for literary tours through England and 
New England. In addition, she published sev- 
eral articles. She was also a member of 
a statewide committee which recommended 
the basic curriculum for English majors in 
Pennsylvania State Colleges. 

By being a good friend, by displaying,rde- 
votion to her work, and by being sinc^fely 
interested in her students. Miss Nair en- 
deared her.self to the many students in her 
classes during the 38 years she spei^,-%it 
Clarion. She showed great personal int«'est 
in her students, not only during the years 
she taught them; but later in her many jgu^r- 
neys she called on them. 

Miss Nair recruited students and helped 
guide them, also she persuaded Dean John 
Mellon to take his first job at ClaricHi. He 
describes her as having had a good sense 
of humor and as an "absent-minded profes- 
sor of the feminine gender." Many tisies, 
she would abruptly halt a class to sent a 
student the few blocks to her house to turn 
off the oven. 



Dr. Ernest Johnson of the Psychology De- 
partment, one of her former students, re- 
calls Miss Nair as, "the epitome of gracious- 
ness. She was more than a mentor, she was 
a dear friend who will always be remem- 
bered. The stidents not only learned from 
her, but also felt the warmth of her person- 
ality; they took pleasure in attending her 
classes." 

Friends of Miss Nair plan to contribute 
in her memory to the Clarion State College 
Scholarship Fund. 

Pins, Rings, Bells 

PINS 

Eddie Carr, Phi Sigma Epsilon, to Sandra 
Harrison, CSC. 

Ray Hough, Al{)ha Chi Rho, to Pam Rider, 
GSC. 3 

RINGS 

\ 
Bruce Stroup, USAF, to Cheryl Ripper, 

CSC. 



Four Clarion State College debaters com- 
piled a 7 5 record in the four- man divi.sion 
at a tournament last weekend at Wake Forest 
University. 

The team of Becky Kasper and Barry Mc- 
Cauliflf had a 3-3 record on the affirmative, " 
defeating Wake Forest. University of South I 
Florida, and Roanoke and sustaining los.ses I 
to George Washington University, Virginia * 



jlililary Institute, and the University of Rich- 
niond. 

Karla Jantsch and Eileen McGinley posted 
.1 4-2 record on the negative with wins over 
Miami, Clemson, Shaw, and second-place J. 
C. Smith. They lost to the University of Vir- 
ginia and Fairmont State. 
' Clarion Stiite debaters are unler the direc- 
tion of Dr. Roger Ilufford. 



Students May RequesI Preferred Doctor 

Several students have shown a preference (jome to the health center Monday through 

for a particular doctor. If a student cannot Friday; Dr. Corbett, 9 to 10; Dr. Keeling, 

go to the infirmary at the lime when that 10 to 12. and Dr. Hayes, 4:30 to 5:30. A 

doctor is there, the .student may rcque.st that nurse is on duty 24 hours a day, and five 

certain doctor. There are three doctors which doctors are on call at all times. 



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Page 4 



THE CALL — Clarion State College, ClarloBi. Pennsylvania 



Vulcans Clip 
Eagles' Wings 



The Vulcans of California, due to the run- 
ning and passing of Jeff Petrucci, rode to 
victory over the Golden Eagles of Clarion by 
the score of 26-21. Clarion lost many oppor- 
tunities to win the game as was shown by 
the final score. 

California scored first after Vernon Phil- 
lips intercepted a Bob Erdeljac pass on the 
Clarion 40-yard line. Four plays later, Petruc- 
ci threw the ball 35 yards to George Carlock 
for a touchdown. Paul Zolak kicked the ex- 
tra point. California 7, Clarion 0. Clarion 
tallied after a California punt was taken by 
Bob Oberdorf and returned to the California 
19-yard line. Three plays later Bob Erdeljac 
scored from the one-yard line. Erdeljac threw 
to Jim Becker for a two-point conversion. The 
score, California 7, Clarion 8. California took 
the kickoff and marched 65 yards in four 
plays, capped by a 23-yard touchdown pass 
from Petrucci to Jim Trambetta. Zolak 
kicked the extra point and the score was 
California 14, Clarion 8. 

In the second quarter Clarion scored after 
Elmer Schuetz intercepted a pass on the 
Cahfornia 45-yard line. Clarion scored in six 
plays, capped by Jim Kocan's 24-yard touch- 
down run. John Dorish missed the extra 
point. The score was California 14, Clarion 
14. Clarion scored again when they got the 
ball on the California 43yard line after a 
punt. They drove the 43 yiards in 11 plays 
with the touchdown coming on a 10-yard pass 
from Erdeljac to Larry McNulty. John Dorish 
kicked the extra point. The score at this 
time was California 14, Clarion 21. On the 
last play of the first half, Fred Wickstrom 
intercepted a California pass to stop the Vul- 
cans' drive. 

In the third quarter the teams traded the 
ball back and forth, with Clarion throwing 
away two opportunities to score. California 
finally broke the ice late in the quarter when 
they drove 81 yards in 11 plays for a touch- 
down. Petrucci ran the last 32 yards for 
the score. Zolak missed the extra point. The 
score at the end of the third quarter was 
California 20, Clarion 21. 

In the fourth quarter. Clarion drove from 
the California 24-yard line after an intercep- 
tion by Tom Humphrey to the one-yard line, 
only to lose the ball on a fumble. After 
a Wickstrom punt, California drove 80 yards 
in 13 plays with Petrucci going over from 
the one-yard line. Zolak missed the extra 
point, the score stood at California 26, Clarion 
21. The teams traded the ball back and forth 
after California intercepted two Erdeljac pas- 
ses, and the game ended with California on 
the Clarion one-yard line. 



Game Summary 



Player 

of the 

Week 




f TOM KOMENDA 

The coaching staff of the Golden Eagles 
football team has named Tom Komcnda as 
player of the week for his performance last 
Saturday against the Vulcans of California. 

Tom, standing six feet and weighing 215 
pounds, is the offensive right tackle. A grad- 
uate of Braddock, Tom is now in his sopho- 
more year at Clarion. An offensive lineman, 
one of the most overlooked players on the 
field, is often the key to a running game. 
Ilis ability to open holes for the runners 
or to stay back and protect the quarterback 
in a pass situation is essential in putting 
six points on the scoreboard. 

Coach Jacks, in citing hjjs reasons for pick- 
ing Tom, commented: "Tom gave us 100 
percent on blocking; he made our running 
game go. When we needed to pick up yard- 
age, we would run a play ri^t up Tom's 
back. He gave us good pass protection — very 
inspirational." 

Being only a sophomore. Tom Komenda 
will certainly be valuable in the offensive 
line for the next two years. 





GAME STATISTICS 




Clarion 

15 
98 
33 
20 
4 


First Downs 
Net Yards Rushing 

Pass Attempts 

Pass Completions 

Interceptions 


California 

15 

215 

20 

8 

3 


208 


Pass Yardage 


131 


306 


Total Offense 


356 


1 


Penalties 


2 


5 


Yards Penalized 


30 


1 


Fumbles 





1 


Fumbles Lost 






SCORE BY QUARTERS 

California 14 6 6—26 

Clarion 8 13 0—21 

SCORING 

California: Petrucci to Carlock, 35 yards 
(Zolak kick). 

Clarion: Erdeljac, 1-yard run (Erdeljac to 
Becker, 2 points). 

Clarion: Kocan, 24-yard run (Dorish kick 
no good). 

Clarion: Erdeljac to McNulty, 10 yards 
(Dorish kick). 

California: Petrucci, 32-yard run (Zolak 
kick no good). 

California: Petrucci, 1-yard run (Zolak kick 
no good). 



Eagle Band Invites 
Parents for Game 
With Shippensburg 

In conjunction with the Annual Parents' 
Day event organized by the athletic depart- 
ment, the Clarion State College Golden Eagle 
Marching Band will hold its first annual Par- 
ents' Day tomorrow at the Clarion-Shippens- 
burg game. 

The day will begin with a brunch of coffee 
and doughnuts at 10 o'clock in the Chandler 
Dining Hall. The parents will have lunch 
with the band members at 11:30 a.m. From 
there, they will go to the field and Dr. Mich- 
alski will demonstrate the band's practice 
procedures. The parents will also attend the 
game and will be seated near the band; 
in addition, the band will provide a pom- 
pon corsage for each mother. 

The pregame show will feature "Hey, Dad- 
dy" and "I Want a Girl" to the formations 
of the words Dad and Mom, respectively, 
in honor of the parents. 

The half-time program for the Clarion-Ship- 
pensburg game will feature a theme based 
on New York. It will begin with the formation 
of the letters N Y to the strains of "Sports 
Medley." The second formation will be a 
piano and a bicycle while the band plays 
"Daisy." The feature number for this final 
home game half-time show will be "Slaughter 
on 10th Avenue." 

The first formation will be an avenue and 
will feature the majorettes in a twirling rou- 
tine. Then the band will change to the stage 
formation and will present Ken McNulty, Ron 
Nash, and Tom Seng on drums. The band 
will then exit to the familiar strains of 
"Carry On for Clarion." 



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Clarion State Hlosts 
Coaches' Mat Clinic 



\ 



Friday, November 1, 1968 



Clarion State College is hosting the Second 
Annual Wrestling Coaches' Chnic today and 
tomorrow at the Waldo S. Tippin Gymnasium, 
with approximately 70 coaches from Pennsyl- 
vania and adjoining states to attend. 

The program begins this evening with re- 
gistration and a welcome by Athletic Direc- 
tor Frank LignelU. 

Victor Liscinski, physical-therapist and 
trainer at Clarion State, will lead off the for- 



Nanz Announces 
Intramural Golf . 
Tournament Points 

The Men's Intramural Athletic Department 
has awarded the first points of the year 
toward the I.M. all-sports traveling trophy 
after a two-day medal play golf tournament. 

Tom Fleig of Sigma Tau Gamma won four 
points toward the trophy with a playoff win 
over Sam Adams of Theta Chi, who received 
two points toward the trophy for the second 
place finish. Both golfers had posted a re- 
spectable 73 score for the 18 holes with Tom 
Fleig winning the playoff. Ray Ford, also 
of Theta Chi, captured one point for his third 
place finish. 

In the standings for the all-sports trophy, 
Sigma Tau Gamma has four points, and The- 
ta Chi has three. The Sig Taus will also 
receive a small trophy for winning this tour- 
nament. In addition, a team match play golf 
tournament will be held this spring. 

A big point total of 10-6-4-2 will be awarded 
soon for the first, second, third, and fourth 
with the completion of the I.M. Touch Flag 
Football League play. 

Tournaments in soccer, co-recreational vol- 
leyball, squash, chess, bowling, and regular 
volleyball will be starting in the next few 
weeks. 

Charles E. Nanz, men's intramural direc- 
tor, urges all interested groups to participate 
in these upcoming events and to stay abreast 
of the entry deadlines. 



ma! program witli a discussion of "Exercises 
for the Preventicoi of Injury." 

Dave Clelland, who has fielded some fine 
teams at GreenvClle High School, will discuss 
"Wrestling Fav<orites." Hon Park whose 
Clearfield High fSchool team has had 32 PIAA 
champs, will r«view "Takedowns." Larry 
Fornicola's topic will be "Offensive Legs." 

A social at the American Legion Home 
in Clarion, will wind up tonight's session. 

Tomorrow tbe group will have breakfast 
in room 203 at Tippin Gymnasium. The final 
clinic session will have Mr. Park discussing 
"Wrestling Favorites," Mr. Clelland o n 
"Takedowns," and Mr. Fomicola reviewing 
"Defensive Legs." Concluding the clinic will 
be "Practice Organization," a discussion by 
the coaches and wrestlers of Clarion State 
College. 



MODERN DINER 

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CLARION 



Nixon's the One at Clarion State College 



By ED WOZMAK 

President elect Richard Milhous Nixon won 
a clear-cut victory at Clarion State College 
as a record 1,228 students came out to vote 
last Tuesday. 

Mr. Nixon, whose national lead was much 
less, ran 18 percent ahead of his closest 
rival. Vice President Hubert Humphrey, in 
the campus election. Out of a total of 1,288 
votes, Mr. Nixon polled 571, or 46 percent, 
Mr. Humphrey received 342 or 28 percent, 
George Wallace received 143 or 12 percent. 



and Peace and Freedom Candidate Dick Gre- 
gory received 11 or .09 percent. 

A statistic of special interest was the 65 
votes or five percent of the students who 
voted for 'No Candidate." "No Candidate" 
was designated on the Clarion ballot as fol- 
lows; "I disagree with the positions of all 
candidates. My political beliefs and convic- 
tions are not represented in this election." 
"No Candidate" ran ahead of Dick Gregory, 
who was on the ballot, and write ins Nelson 
Rockefeller, Ted Kennedy, Barry Goldwater, 



William Fulbright, and Eugene McCarthy. 

Except for Humphrey's showing of 28 per- 
cent. Clarion's vote percentages for the other 
candidates compared favorably with the na- 
tional percentages. Mr. Nixon's national per- 
centage of 43 percent, was three percent 
less than his vote at Clarion. Mr, Wallace's 
national percentage of 13 percent was one 
percent more than his vote at Clarion. Mr. 
Humphrey polled a big 43 percent nationally 
while receiving only 28 percent here. 

Election results from other schools are as 



follows: Westminster College chose Richard 
Nixon by a huge 68 percent while giving 
Hubert Humphrey a mere 1.5 percent. S. T. 
A. G. Party candidate Pat Paul.'^cn ran a 
close third with 10 percent. Lock Haven Col- 
lege chose Richard Nixon by 47 percent or 
201 votes to Hubert Humphrey's 24 percent 
or 105 votes. Lock Haven's voting turnout 
was a very poor 424 out of 2,100 students. 
At Princeton University, an undergraduate 
election gave Hubert Humphrey the presi- 
dency with 39 percent of the vote. Mr. Nixon 



received :i8 pcrcciil and Dick Gregory 11 
percent. Clarion's voting turnout of 42 per- 
cent was very close to Princeton's 45 per- 
cent 

At Ponn State University, Hi percent of 
the students turned out to elect Nixon by 
a narrow 32 2 percent to 31.5 percent margin. 
George Wallace ran third with 10.2 percent. 

The studcnt.s ot Allegheny County Commun- 
ity College elected Hubert Humphrey by an 
overwhelming .53.6 percent to Richard Nixon's 



22.8 percent. George Wallace received 18.7 
percent of the vote. 

On the lighter side of Clarion's mock elec- 
tion were the write ins. Mr. Emmetl Graybill 
of the Political Science department. Presi- 
dent James Gemmell and Head Football 
Coach Al Jacks all got one vote. Woody 
Hayes, the Ohio State football coach, got 
three voles, and Pat Paul.sen had 43. Perhaps 
with more campaign funds and better party 
organizations, these candidates will do better 
in 1972! 



Voters in Campus Mock Election 






Vol. 40, No. 7 



CLARION STATE COLLEGE — CLARION, PENNSYLVANIA 



Friday, November 8, 1968 



British Politician 



STUDENT SOf.OISTS STAR 



Will Speak Here Roiicone Conducts Symphony 



REGISTERING TO VOTE in the mock pieaulciiUai election 
held Tuesday were Randy Whamlery, Tony Genis, Greg Kel- 
lick, and Riiss Benson. Taking care of student voter regis- 
tration were Sue Fair, Terry Carlson, and Sandy Diesel. 



CSC Debaters Win, Lose 
In Tournament in Georgia 



Last weekend Clarion's debaters swung into 
a lull schedule, with 12 debaters in compe- 
tition at two tournaments. 

Four Clarion varsity debaters competed 
with over 100 top teams from all over the 
nation at the 5Jpory tournament in Atlanta, 
Ga. Juniors Ka^ Berkey andjpetti Ferguson 
defeated the' top 'team in the tournarnent, 
University of Miami, which ended with a 
7-1 record and the first and filth place in- 
dividual speakers in the tournament. 

The power matching resulted in Miss Ber- 
key and Miss Ferguson being matched 
again.st last year's national runner-up, Butler 
University, in the fourth round. Clarion's 
team lost this round, and finished with a 
3-5 record, with wins over Miami, Northern 
Iowa, and University of Maryland, and losses 
to Butler, Florida, CCNY, Georgia, and Dru- 
ry. 

Junior Mary Lou McCauliff and senior Pat 
Dobson had a 4-4 record in the Emory tourna- 
ment with wins over University of Michigan, 
University of North Carolina, Indiana State, 
and Central Michigan, and losses to Navy, 
Johns Hopkins, Auburn, and Dayton. 

Freshman Lillian Pfaff and sophomore Ca- 
thy Stinard had the best record for Clarion 
State in the varsity division at Susequehanna 
University, where they v/ere 3-2 with wins 
over Albany, Lock Haven, and West Chester, 
with losses to Thiel and University of Dela- 
ware. 

Sophomore Marilyn Roslanowick and fresh- 
man Karla Jantsch took the affirmative side 
in the varsity division at Susquehanna, and 
had a 2-3 record, with wins over the Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh and Catholic University, 



and losses to Cortland, Washington and Lee, 
and University of West Virginia. 

In the novice division at Susquehanna, 
freshman teams of Jim Rarick, Judy Mc- 
Auley, Al Carraway, and Diane Schultheiss 
each finished with 2-3 records. 



Pre-Regislration 
Has Been Changed 

Clarion has changed its pre-registration 
procedure. In the past only advisors were 
given copies of courses. However, this year 
students also have access to lists of avail- 
able courses, and to copies of pre-registration 
procedures. Also, students will use their so- 
cial security numbers, not their student num- 
bers, for filling out pre-registratibn ^orms. 
Any student who does not have a social secur- 
ity number should obtain an application for 
one from Dr. Gray, Dean of Academic Af- 
fairs. 

Pre-registration for the second semester 
will be conducted Monday through Friday. 
Those students who fail to pre-register during 
the week will be dropped from the enroll- 
ment list and their place will be given to 
an incoming student. It is the student^s re- 
sponsibility to arrange to meet with his ad- 
visor to fill out pre-registration forms. If 
any student does not know who his advisor 
is, contact Dr. King in Room 56, Peirce Sci- 
ence Center. In the case of a schedule con- 
flict in which it is impossible for a student 
to meet with his advisor, the student should 
go to the Office of Academic Affairs. 



OPINION POLL 



On Wednesday 

Dame Margaret Patricia Horn.sby -Smith, 
Privy Councillor for the past nine years, 
and one of England's busiest "women on 
the move," will speak here on Wednesday 
at 8 in Peirce Auditorium, under the aus- 
pices of the British Culture Center of Clarion 
State College. The subject of her lecture will 
be "English-American Relations." 

Dame Patricia has carved a notable career 
for herself in Uie tumultuous worlds of Brit- 
ish politics and big business. Educated at 
Richmond county school. Dame Patricia be- 
gan working as a shorthand-typist at the 
age of 16 to support her invalid mother. 
Her interest in politics waxed early; at 17 
she was the youngest member of the Con- 
servative Party's flying Squad of Speakers; 
and shortly after the onset of World War 
II, she became secretary to Lord Seborne, 
Minister of Economic Warfare. 

Described as "One of the Best . . ." 

Her drive, which led Harold Macrailia;» 
to describe her as "one of the best, if not 
probably the very best, candidates in 
the entire country," quickly led her to 
some of her country's highest governmental 
posts. In 1950, Dame Patricia was elected 
M.P. for Chlslehurst, Kent, a position which 
she held untU 1966. In 1951, Winston Churchill 
appointed her Pariiamentary Secretary to the 
Health Ministry; and less than two years 
after taking her seat in the House of Com- 
mons she received her first junior office at 
the Ministry of Health, making her the young- 
est woman ever to receive a ministerial ap- 
pointment. Six years later, Harold Macmillan 
promoted her to joint Under-Secretary of 
State to the Home Office; she was then trans- 
ferred to the Pensions Ministry, was made 
Privy Councillor in 1959, and a Dame of 
the Order of the British Empire in 1961. 

1961 also marked Dame Patricia's en- 
trance into the world of business in her work 
for Cortaulds, England's giant textile firm. 
Dame Patricia has taken coordinated collec- 
tions, specifically chosen for the appropriate 
market, from a number of the company's 
subsidiaries, to Warsaw, Moscow, and Swe- 
den. She is a director of the Sutton Har- 
bour Improvement Co., and a member of 
the board of the Andre Bernard Company, 
England's leading hairdressing salon-owning 
company. In May of 1968 she was named 
vice-chairman of the Apparel Group of the 
Briti.sh Week being held in Tokyo in Septem- 
ber 1969. 



CALL Editors 



Before Enthusiastic Audience 



On Wednesday evening, the large and 
enthusiastic audience that had braved the 
elements in order to attend the opening con- 
cert of the Clarion State College Symphony 
Orchestra gave the lie to Verlalne's famous 
poem: 

"II pleure dans mon coeur 
Come il pleut sur la ville . . ."' 

("My heart is weeping 
As rain falls on the town . . .") 

On the contrary, ail hearts present were 
singing, despite the rain outside, as a result 
of the outstanding evening of music presented 
by the orchestra and the featured student 
.soloists under the direction of Edward Ron- 
cone, assistant professor of music. The mu- 
sicians responded nohly to the precise and 
sensiti\c baton of their conductor in a varied 
program of symphonic fare, ranging from 
the baroque to the romantic to the contem- 
posary. 

Gluck's overture to "Tphigenia Hi Aulos" 
opened tne program with dignity and lyri- 
cism. From the first downbeat, which brought 
forth a rich outpouring of string tone, it 
was im Tiediately apparent that the CSC or- 
chestra has grown immeasurably since its 
inception last year. As the evening went on, 
this became increasingly evident. 



The Vivaldi "Concerto in A Minor," which 
followed the Gluck, proved a sparkling con- 
trast to the broad, measured lines of the over- 
ture. This work, written for two violins and 
small baroque orchestra, presented a.s solo- 
ists Lynne Mason and Nicolas Rutherford, 
who are students of David Mallory, assistant 
professor of music. 

Their playing was secure and pleasing, 
clean technically, completely in character as 
to interpretation, well synchronized with one 
another and with the accompanying group. 
The result wa.s a line display of ensemble 
feelinjf, most satisfying to the listener. 

A transition to the present then ensued, 
but did not shock; tor Robert Starer's "Dal- 
ton Set" (a group of short sketches written 
ih various styles) managed the jump from 
pre-classic lo today quite painlessly. This 
was largely due to the first piece "Prelude," 
a cunning paraphra.^c of Bach's majestic or- 
gan preludes, in which the brass ahd wood- 
wind chclr.i played to full sonorous effect. 
"Serenade" superimpospd a romantic melody 
over a humorous accompaniment; "Waltz" 
was a cliarmin.:? pastiche of Old VieuLa; 
"March" brought everyone into the fun with 
an exotic-sounding processional. Mr. Roncone 
conducted these amusing morsels with a deft 



Women to Visit Mens Dorms? Attend Conference 
Some Men Like the Idea 



Forest Manor has recently passed a ruling 
allowing an open house every Sunday after- 
noon in Forest Manor South. Other men's 
residence halls do not have such rules. It 
is more or less frowned upon for women 
to visit, even to go into the lobbies of, Mc- 
Kean, Ballentine and Wilson Halls. If the 
house council of Forest Manor has taken 
such an independent action, why is it not 
possible for the other men's dorms to do 
the same? This prompted us to ask the follow- 
ing question in our opinion poll: "Would you 
approve of a ruling which provides visiting 
hours for women at men's dormitories? Why 
or why not?" Here were some reactions: 

John Schellenberger: "Yes, I approve, be- 
cause men get tired of going to women's 
dorms to see their girls. By going to the 
boys' dorm every so often, it would be a 
change of atmosphere. 

Becky Soules: "Yes, I approve of it. If 
you don't make such a ruling, girls will wind 
up in mens' dorms anyway, so why not make 
it legal'" 

Ray Warco: "Sure. But only at certain 
hours. But this should only be done for short 
periods of time because guys like a lot of 
privacy, lljey have such a system at Slippery 



Rock, and it works, and it's accepted really 
well by both men and women students. 

Phil Kennedy: "I'd approve of that for 
several reasons. If a girl and guy want to 
watch television, they can do so in the men's 
dorm if they don't like what everyone is 
watching at the other dorms. It would be 
less crowded and less noisy if students were 
more spread out. This would give more places 
for people to go. It would also make a guy 
feel a girl has some interest in him if a 
girl came to visit him." 

Al Serf: "Yes. Guys have visiting pri- 
vileges at women's dorms, and Ralston has 
hours for visiting in the rec-room, so why 
shouldn't the men have similar hours to visit 
in rec-rooms of men's dorms? 

John Cable: "Yes. they have it at other 
schools. Why shouldn't we have it here? Our 
school is growing; this is another sign of 
progress." 

Forest Manor can have open house, wo- 
men's dormitories can have open house if 
approved by house council. If the men wish 
visiting hours maybe they could decide upon 
an open house in their own dorms. The wo- 
men of Clarion State CoUege would certainly 
back such an action. 



In New York City 

The Call editors, Carolyn Welesko, editor 
in chief, and Sandy Diesel, news editor, left 
last Thursday, October 31, for a three-day 
conference of the Associated Collegiate Press 
and National Council of College Publications 
Advisers. Accompanying them was the Call 
adviser. Dr. Richard Redfem. The conference 
was held at the Waldorf-Astoria in New York 
City. 

The purpose of the conference was for the 
1,200 collegiate journalists to exchange op- 
inions about the mass media and to appraise 
the different campus publications. 

There were students present from all over 
the nation as well as Canada. 

At the conference, special sectional meet- 
ings and short course programs were held 
for both the students and advisers of the 
newspaper and the yearbook staffs. Special 
guest speakers such as Betsy Wade, copy 
editor of the New York Times; Professor 
Bill Ward, University of Nevada; and Bob 
Eddy, publisher and editor of Hie Hartford 
Courant, addressed the various meetings and 
programs. 

A luncheon sponsored by the Ford Motor 
Company on Sat\irday, November 2, ended 
tbe conference. 




hand and a subtly understated awareness 
of the tongue-in-cheek attitude of the com- 
poser. 

The final number of the first half of the 
concert was the first movement of Mendels- 
sohn's "Concerto in Q Minor" for piano and 
orchestra. The soloist, Jeanne Matlack, a stu- 
dent of Annette Roussel-Pesche, played with 
all the brilliance and grace characteristic 
of the piano works of this early Romantic 
composer. Miss Matlack possesses the happy 
combination of poise and vitality. Her tech- 
nical dexterity, projection of phrase and nu- 
ance, plus an effortless blending with the 
orchestral ensemble produced a well-rounded 
performance of sterling quality. It is to be 
noted that the accompaniments to both 
concert! programmed were excellent. 

The two contemporary works played after 
intermissibn gave solid proof that it is possi- 
ble to be melodic and appealing, as well 
as atonal and cacaphonic. Certainly, the Bar- 
tok "Roumanian Folk Dances, " as interpret- 
ed with warmth and charm by Mr. Roncone 
and the orchestra, are ^thoroughly enchant- 
ing. Deserving of spectal mention for the 
solo work therein displayed are Kenneth 
Show, clarinet, Linda Harriger, flute, and 
Mr. Mallory, the codfcertiXiaster. 

The "Symphony No. 2" by Giannini pro- 
vided a spectacular close to a beautiful pro- 
gram. The composer has written marvelous- 
ly for the instruments, making possible an 
endless variety of tonal and musical expres- 
sion. The allegro movement is a contrast 
in large columns of'^iardeht sonority punc- 
tuated by sparse, episodic transitional pas- 
sages. In the adagio the orchestra's wood- 
winds and brasses melted together glowing 
harmonies which were embellished by the' 
lyricism of the strings. The resultant impres- 
sionistic quaUty was sparked by a lovely, 
recurrent oboe theme, played with a distinc- 
tively haunting quality by Richard Abel. The 
final allegro brought forth all the orchestral 
resources with pulsating rhythms, swirling 
colors, contrasting dynamics all building to 
a stirring apex. 

And, as Joan Douglass, the able tympanist, 
struck the very last sound to be heard, a 
volley of applause and bravos burst forth 
from the large, enthusiastic audience. Their 
kudos were well-merited by the fine orches- 
tra, the distinguished conductor, and the tal- 
ented young soloists who had given them 
a uniquely rewarding musical experience. 

Coming Events 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9 

—Football: Clarion vs. Slippery Rock, 
away, 1:30 p.m. 
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12 
— Quarterback Club Dinner, Chandler, at 

6:30 p.m. 
—Distinguished Scholars Lecture Series: 
Dr. Preston Hammer, Planetarium Audi- 
torium, 8 p.m. 
WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 13 

— Marching Band Revue, Gym, 8 p.m. 
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15 
—Rifle: Clarion vs. Allegheny, Clarion, at 
6 p.m. 



Course Lists to Be Posted 

ATTENTION STUDENTS: Due to a print- 
ing failure, a list of course oiTerings for the 
second semester will NOT be distributed 
to each student. Instead, these lists will be 
posted on three different bulletin boards in 
the Administration Building. 

One list will be located on the board op- 
posite the switchboard, another will be on 
the board across from the bookstore, and 
the third will be posted on the second floor 
board outside of the English Department 
office. Students are urged to check these 
lists before pre-registering. 



JEANNE MATLACK 



LYNXE MASON 



Page 2 



THE CALL -~ Clarion-Stftte College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



Friday, November 8, 1968 



Editorially 



Speaking 



We ^rc Still No. 1 in Our Hearts 



Wc, at Clarion, have recently suf- 
fered an insult to our pride. On Octo- 
ber 26, our football team lost to Cali- 
fornia State College. This game, as 
wo all well know, determined whether 
or not we would be participating in 
the State championship game. 

Such a loss is not an easy one for 
students who are habitual winners in 
football. Our last two' seasons have 
given us a powerful image and have 
given our rivals reason to respect and 
to fear our mighty team. We did not 
fail thorn; instead our team continued 
to win — continued to assert their su- 
periority. 

Rut now that we have been de- 
feated, it is easy to note that the stu- 
dents of CSC are not poor losers. The 
team is not being condemned, but 
rather they are being congratulated 
for the fine record they have achieved 
so far this season. 

A defeat for Clarion did not mean 
a downfall in strength. The team, in 
fact, made a magnificent comeback in 
last Saturday's game against Shippens- 
buig State College. Students cheered 
the team on to victory because the 
students cared. At the start of that 



game, the entire campus sensed an air 
of dignity about the team and about 
the students; Clarion's strength was 
not to be undermined by a single con- 
ference loss. 

One of the many signs that proud- 
ly waved on campus this past week 
read; "Number Two in the State, but 
still Number One in our hearts." This 
is perhaps the best summary of how 
the students really feel about their 
team. In many ways, a loss in foot- 
ball (even an important loss) does not 
mean defeat. We are still tough, we 
are still respected, and we are still 
proud of our team. 

We may not be looking forward 
to a State victory celebration or even 
a section title, but we are still holding 
our heads high with the satisfaction of 
knowing that our team did their best 
for us. We could not ask for more. 

Every student on this campus still 
has the right to say, "We're number 
one!" as strongly as ever before — in 
our hearts we know that we still are. 
After all, isn't that what really mat- 
ters? 

— C. W. 




Clarion Student Senate Decides 
To Participate in the Programs 
Of National Students Association 



Q*,ot^tv^ WtiA^i?r 



The Student Senate, during their regular 
meetin}* on October 30, decided to actively 
participate in the programs established by 
the United States National Students Associa- 
tion. The Student Senate feels that it is to 
the ad\antage of the Clarion student body 
to receive the benefits made available by 
the USNSA. 

Dick Mears was appointed by Tom Paolino, 
president of Student Senate, as Clarion's NSA 
coordinator, whose job it is to correspond 
with the NSA office. 

At present, the NSA Service Division spon- 
sors seven programs. They are Educational 
Travel, Inc., USNSA Insurance Trust, Stu- 
dent Government Information Service, Cul- 
tural Program, Alliance for Campus Talent, 
NSA Record Club, and College Calendar and 
Handbook. 

Educational Travel, Inc. is designed as a 
means of providing low cost overseas travel 
and tour programs for students. ETI's non- 
profit status accounts for the low costs and 
has made ETI the most widely used student 
travel organization in the U.S. 

ETI's program is similar to those of the 
larget- airlines where the student buys a half 
fare Id card. ETI issues the student the In- 
ternational Id card at the cost of three dol- 
lars. There are several difference, however, 
between the ETI program and those of the 
airl.nos. First, reductions through the ETI 
program range from 50 percent off the going 
rntes ob lodgings, food, museums, and so 
forth, to 70 percent discount on special stu- 
dent charter airplane flights, boats, and 
trains.^ The airlines usually provide just the 
50 percent off for the airplane trip. Second, 
ETI reductions are for all regular flights 
vvhcreae'^ the airlines program is designed 
on a standy-by basis. 

When applying for the Id card, the student 
may also order the Official Guide to Europe. 
This bo<^ lists all the discounts available 
to America|| students as well as containing 
the only complete listing of all student char- 
ter flights within Europe. It also describes 



train and bus timetables for the continent. 

As a reference source and planning guide, 
NSA publishes The Traveling Student, which 
highlights the times and places of European 
"happenings" such as the Mardi Gras; pros 
and cons of tour travel, camping in Europe; 
summer study programs; scholarships; and 
so forth. ;^ 

ETI also has a complete tour service for 
the student interested in seeing famous EW* 
opean sights. The tours rang« in . duration.** 
from a few hours to 15 days. 

Holders of the Id card als» can obtain 
substantially lower rates for the rental or 
purchase of cars while in Europe. In this 
program, the student can buy a tax-free car 
at discount prices in Europe and use It during 
his stay and ship it back to the U. S. 

This is but one of the services provided 
by USNSA. Information on the other six pro- 
grams will be provided in future issues of 
the Clarion Caltt. 

The USNSA provides excellent o[»portunities 
for the student, l^e their program extensive- 
ly for fantastic savings and entertainment! 

Art Films Presented 

Art films have come to Clarion State Col- 
lege at last. The Audio-Visual Communica- 
tions Department is presenting a series of 
films designed to form a moving montage «•• 
of the motion picture industry. The wide var- 
iety of films depicts filmmaking as an art 
which uses sight, sound and time as its ele- 
ments. 

Last night's showing gave a sampling of 
the types of films students and faculty can 
view every other Thursday evening at 8 in 
Peirce Auditorium: "The Golden Age of Com- 
edy," "The Great McGongle," "Fatal Glass 
of Beer," and "Hurry, Hurry" (two versions, 
one by W. C. Fields and the other by Sper- 
matozoa). Discussions are held after the mo- 
vies for anyone interested. 



Was Tuesday's Mock Election LettcrS tO the EdUor 



A Turning Point on Campus? 



I 



The students of Clarion deserve to 
be commended on the over-all turnout 
for the mock presidential election held 
on Tuesday. The total number of stu- 
dents .who voted was 1,228. This is 
the largest number, ever to be tallied 
at any election, whether for Kcme- 
coming queen or for student officers 
such as class officers and student sen- 
ators. It is gratifying to know that the 
students ?'e finally taking ?n interest 
in campus events and activities. 

In comparison with Lock Haven, 
Clarion's turnout for the mock elec- 
tion was far superior. In the balloting 
at Lock Haven, 424 students Out of an 
approximate 2,100 students cast their 
vote. In an undergraduate poll c6ti- 
ducted at Princeton University in Oc- 
tober, 1,374 votes were tallied. This 
number comprised 45 percent of the 
undergraduate population. Clarion's 
percentage of students voting was ap- 
proximately 42 percent. This percen- 
t.^ge proves that the. students of Clar- 
ion are as interested fn politics and the 
outside world as is one of the most pro- 
gressive universities in this country. 

If the students of Clarion contin- 
ue to support these activities sponsor- 
ed by various groups and organizations, 
there will be no limiting of the changes 
possible. An interested student body 
is needed before changes can be made 
in any facet of our academic and so- 
cial lives. 

If the increase of student support 



shown in the past weeks continues to 
grow, we, the students of Clarion, may 
be given the opportunities ^nd advan- 
tages we are clamoring for. We may 
be allowed a greater voice in determin- 
ing the course of student affairs. But 
support must be continually manifest- 
ed. Now that it has been proven that 
there is an interested student body, a 
student body that cares, don't disap- 
point the editors of the Call and your- 
i^elves by retreating into shells of un- 
interest. 

It is interesting to note the ser- 
iousness with which the students of 
Clarion voted. This election had no 
major significance in the outcome of 
the national election, yet the students 
voted as if it were the national elec- 
tion. There were relatively few votes 
for men outside the election. Some 
Students feared that Pat Paulsen would 
win here at Clarion, but the students 
again proved that they are intelligent, 
interested citizens and that, given the 
opportunity they can act in a respon- 
sible manner. 

The editors of the Call are proud 
to be witnesses of the academic and 
social awakening here at Clarion, and 
we, with the support of the students, 
will try and bring about the changes 
needed. We hope that this is indeed 
a favorable indication of a growing 
student interest on our campus. 

— SMD 



A Highway and a Low 



Life i.s but a journey 
Along two winding roads. 
The first is called the Highway; 
The second, called the Low. 

Some choose to take the Highway, 
With all its sights so fair, 
To wonder at its glamor 
And its sweetly scented air. 

They reach their destination 
And look on in despair. 
They remove tlieir tinted glasses . . 
Their world'.s no longer there. 

To these falls sad displeasure. 
They li'.'e a life of woe. 
I';!t what happened to the travelers 
That chose to take the Low? 

They start with many struggles, 



The way i.s rough and steep. 
But they dare to keep on going 
When obstacles they meet. 

They too conclude their journey. 
And much to their surprise 
Tliey find a world of happiness 
And rosey tinted skies. 

But, unlike the Highway 
This world will never end. 
And they live on in happiness 
V/ith Kindness, Love, and Friends. 

' So you see, my fellow traveler, 
Tliere's a highway and a low 
Ard each man must decide 
The way his heart shall go. 

— R. P. (A Venango Campus Freshman) 



*CalV Policy Questioned 

Editor, the Call: 

In regards to the column included in the 
Clarion Call, a Peek at Greeks. As everyone 
knows, this column is written by members 
of Greek organizations, for members of Greek 
clubs, and all other individuals interested 
in their activities. The column was designed 
for Greeks to inform the campus of activities 
occurring within these organizations, and not 
only the activities but also an entertaining 
side of the Greeks. However, as of this semes- 
ter, this does not appear true. Cutting and 
rewriting of articles by the paper's editors 
has, we feel, reduced this column to a point 
where its articles are almost as dull as the 
cartoons included in the paper. 

It would be fascinating to know if the re- 
writer and cutter of these articles is, or 
is not a member of a Greek organization. 
An example of this person's work is noted 
in the column handed in for printing by the 
brotherhood of Phi Sigma Epsilon, for the 
November 1 issue. Congratulations were ex- 
tended, by the brothers, to President Gem- 
mell on his daughter's wedding. This gesture 
of friendliness was not deemed "suitable" 
to be printed into the article, on the Peek 
at Greeks. The editor, evidently, does not 
realize the importance of this column to the 
Greeks as a "mouthpiece" to the public. 
This article is a voice for the fraternities 
and sororities, and the rewritings and cut- 
tings have lowered this articulation. 

We would not be surprised if this letter 
to the editor would be rewritten, cut, and 
reduced. We extend an "urgent" invitation 
to our fellow Greek members to help "save 
our column." 

BROTHERS OF PHI SIGMA EPSILON 

THE EDITOR'S REPLY * ~- ' 

The student newspaper should contain 
newsworthy material for the entire student 
body. No single article should be written 
exclusively for one group or one ofgAniidtidh. 

The Greek column is written by th^jGreek 
organizations, but it should be written' for 
all students. The column therefpre, should, 
as you say, inform "the cafmpus of activities 
occurring within these organizations," and it 
does. 

The only items that are cut are lliose \k%\[ 
are not speciflc Greek material, such as the 
wedding congratulations, or items that:a^o 
not clear to the bulk of Clarion's students. 
In addition, the only rewritten articles are 
those poorly written or grammatically incor- 
rect items. 

The editor does incidently realize that the 
Greek news is a mouthpiece to the public, 
and for this reason, would like to see more 
news included in this article which informs 
rather than implies personal comments. 

Most of the Greek Organizations have com- 
plied with our news policy on Greek news, 
and for this, we commend you. You have 
helped to raise the standards of your paper 
as well as to inform your fellow students 
of your activities. 



Validity of Vulgarity 

Dear Editor: 

Sigh . . . Sigh . . . 

It seems that every week a letter appears 
in The Call denouncing student apathy and 
lack of school spirit. 1 might as well keep 
the trend going. 

Tau Kappa Epsilon and its pledges have 
made a point to show the student body and 
the football team that we are behind them. 
One of the standard methods is the hanging 
of signs on campus proclaiming quips of 
support for the Golden Eagles. 

On Wednesday (Nov. 6), a sign appeared 
on Egbert Hall's front porch reading, "TKE 
Sez Kick Some Ass." My, my, but it must 
have caused some excitement — although we 
feel it was not within the student body as 
much as it was within the walls of Egbert. 
The time was not even taken to untie the 
ropes that held it. Yank and rip— it was 
down ! 

We really have our doubts as to the harm 
that this word has produced on campus. If 
it truly offended someone, we apologize. But 
I hasten to add that we feel the only offend- 
ing that was committed was within a stif- 
ling, dictatorial, antiquated administration. 

Keep yanking and ripping up there. You 
must keep the apathy and lack of spirit go- 
ing—maybe just to protect your own posi- 
tions. 

Respectfully, GARY S. WILSHER 

THE EDITOR'S REPLY 

In answer to the two letters above, it should 
be noted that two opposing views are evident 
of school spirit. Two students are defending 
signs in support of diminishing apathy; an- 
other student is questioning the means by 
which school spirit is encouraged. 

SUEely a medium can be reached which 
satishes all students. The very fact that 
Coach Al Jacks disapproves of the use of 
vulgarity for team support should mean 
sopiething to the students. 

An effective sign does not necessarily have 
to .be |crude. In fact, a sign based on "or- 
igirirflily and wit" as stated above would pro- 
, bab^>; receive a better over-all effect. 

Wfe agree that the administration should not 
he. ".stifling, dictorial, and antiquated." but 
the students .should make efforts to prevent 
such activities by being reasonable in their 
judgements. 

Signs should not be censored, but shouldn't 
students be .stimulated in a more appealing 
warv? It would be sad to think that Clarion's 
students need vulgar signs to denounce ap- 
athy. 

The Big Rush for Grades 

Editor, the Call: 

Slowly but surely, the glazed expressions 
on the faces of the student body are beginning 
to fade. Gradually, also, the effects of sleep- 
less nights are subsiding due to the restful 
atmosphere provided in the Social Founda- 
tions. Physical Science, and mo.st other clas- 
ses which have already settled back into 
a usual state of lethargy. 



Yes, once again the students of CSC are 
recovering from the regular "pre-comment" 
exam season. In keeping with the tradition, 
the more thoughtful members of the faculty 
have done their best to schedule their exams 
as close to the deadline as possible. The 
consistency of this practice is reflected in 
the quantity of discarded No Doz wrappers 
and in the faces of red-eyed students floating 
from class to class. i 

It is amazing how many professors have 
forgotten their own experience as struggling 
college students. They cry, "Knowledge is 
what you are here for, and not grades." 
Why then do these same instructors fail to 
give students a break when it comes to test- 
ing and grades? ApparenUy they have little 
use for these "worthless symbols," so why the 
big rush to get a grade in the books? 

My advice to the students is to keep those 
cold tablets and start hitting those books. 
Remember that pre-Thanksgiving exam sea- 
son is just around the corner. What's the 
difference anyway? It's only a grade. 

Red-Eyed and Failing 

Cafeteria Lines Mobbed 

Editor, The Call: 

I am writing this letter in regards to those 
people who feel they are of a privileged 
class. This class is composed of those stu- 
dents who feel that they are permitted to 
walk to. "the head of the cafeteria Hnes, push 
their way in, and never have to suffer the 
pains of standing in lines. 

I realize that nothing can be done about 
this situation, but I also feel that it should 



be brought to the attention of these students. 
In some instances, it may be necessary to 
"cut" in hne, but for the same students 
to do this every day is ridiculous. ' 

The impression these students create is 
nauseous. The food is not of that high quality 
to be the catalyst of this reaction on the 
part of the students, but every day at 4:50 
the mad rush to the front of the line creates 
this illusion. 

-J. H. 



'^^i^wg^twn^j^ 




The Clarion Call 



CALL Office, Room I, Harvey Hall 
Clarion State College, Clarion, Penna. 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Carolyn Welesko 

BUSINESS MANAGER Tom Smith 

NEWS EDITOR Sandy Diesel 

FEATURE EDITOR - Sue Fair 

COPY EDITOR Rosemary Slebodnik 

EXCHANGE EDITOR Peg Foley 

CO-SPORTS EDITORS Dennis Morrow, Gary Andres 

STAFF MEMBERS Elizabeth Curley, Margaret Beierle, 

Ann Rohrbaugh, Ed Wozniak, Gary Daurora, Larry Carter, 
Georgana Winters, Linda Sonnenfeld, Owen Winters, Dianna 
Cherry, Larilyn Andre, Dick Mears, Bob Toth, Jerry Zary, 
Nancy Sarginger, Judy Summy, Linda Pifer, Kathy Jones 
ADVISOR Richard K. Redfem 



IMAI 



_ utmt n 

PEHSTLFAIU 

mrspAPBt 

MIBIl "J 



I 



T 






Friday, November 8, 1968 



THE CALL Clarion Statt College, Clarion, Pennsylvlnlt 



Page 3 



Camp Blue Jay Serves As 
Job Corps Center; Clarion 
Sends Student Teachers 



Venango News 



Camp Blue Jay, a job corps conservation 
center, is located about 30 miles north of 
Clarion in Marienville. This center is signifi- 
cant to Clarion State College, because four 
students from the Special Education Depart- 
ment are assigned to student teach at this 
center every semester for a nine-week period. 




JACK MATUSKY, CSC student teach- 
er, illustrates reading levels to one of 
Blue July's Corpsinen. 

Camp Blue Jay was started in April of 
1965, and was one of the firsi of its kind. 
In addition, it is the only center of its kind 
i" Western Pennsylvania. The purpose of this 
job corps center is to train underprivileged 
males, who range between the ages of 16 
and 21 years of age. These young men are 
unemployed, unskilled, and are usually school 
drop-outs with little educational background. 
The average entering corpsman has a read- 
ing level of third grade— fourth month, and 
has a limited background in mathematics. 
In addition, the average corpsman is nine 
pounds underweight upon entering, and has 
received no medical attention ic his lifetime. 

The average stay of corpsmen is nine 
months, but many stay as long as two years. 



Eight out of ten of those who enter and 
stay for at least nine months leave the center 
with a substantial gain both academically 
and in some spe'ciflc vocational training. 

Corpsmen are placed in a program which 
alternates in weekly schedules- of on-the-job 
training and formal education. The education 
program consists of training in reading, ma- 
thematics, physical education, driver educa- 
tion, and general study of the world of work. 
All corpsmen work at individual rates and 
levels, and each progresses according to 
individual accomplishment. The work pro- 
gram consists of training in carpentry, auto- 
motive repair, cooking, and operation of hea- 
vy equipment. 

The job corps center is sponsored by the 
United States Forest Center and is part of 
a national program to help the underprivil- 
eged. . A staff of 32 act as administrative 
heads and instructors, and every staff mem- 
ber serves as a counselor to the corpsmen. 

Approximately 120 corpsmen are now in 
training at Camp Blue Jay. These corpsmen 
are housed in five dormitories on the center 
grounds in Allegheny National Forest. Other 
buildings include a dining hall, gymnasium, 
classroom buildings, and an administrative 
building. All buildings are maintained by the 
corpsmen and staff. 

Corpsmen graduate into jobs, military ser- 
vice, go back to public schools, or into more 
specialized training. 



Spotlight On 
Other Campuses 

Westminster College- 
Richard Nixon was chosen as the presiden- 
Ual favorite at Westminster College by a 
majority of 68%, Hubert Humphrey running 
second with 15%, Paulsen third with 5%, 
and Wallace with 5%. 
Lock Haven State College- 
Lock Haven students "elected" Richard 
Nixon as the next president of the United 
States. In the balloting, only 424 students out 
of 2100 cast their vote. The results were: 
Nixon 201, Humphrey 105, George Wallace 
43, Dick Gregory 30, and Pat Paulsen 26. 
Edinboro State College— 

Edinboro State College is in the process of 
revising their present cut system. The 
changes proposed are that upperclassmen 
would not be penalized for class absence, 
that freshmen would be bound to the present 
cut system, similar to that at Clarion, and 
that the instructor, at his discretion, would 
be permitted to give a student zero if the 
student missed a quiz, test or lab. 
Shippensburg State College— 

Shippensburg is m the process of trying to 
abolish women's hours. The students at SSC 
contend that women are mature enough to 
formulate their own hours. They feel that 
the students are being sheltered and not 
adequately prepared for the world in which 
they will live. 




i H : i,»\tmm 

DOUG HAMROCK, CSC student teach- 
er, guides Corpsmen. 



ALUmm NEWS 

Winklmann Named 
Advertising Manager 



Joseph H. Winklmann, a Clarion State al- 
umnus, has been named general advertising 
manager for Massey-Ferguson, Inc., manu- 
facturers of farm machinery, with headquar- 
ters ini Des Moines, Iowa. 

A naUve of Wilkinsburg, Winklmann has 
had 13 years in marketing. After serving 
with the U.S. Navy from 1951 to 1955, he 
became a salesman for the Sun Oil Company. 
In 1962, he was named manager of the Trade- 
marx Division of IDL, Inc. 

Winklmann joined the Westinghouse Elec- 
tric Corporation in 19r>5 as national sales 
promotion manager for major appliances, 
and was named national merchandising man- 
ager of the room air conditioner division 
in 1967. 



Savings Bonds and Freedom Shares make 
the ideal combination gift. Buy them "over 
the counter" at your bank, and ask for your 
free gift envelope. 



Publicity Committee Plans 

Hours of hard work is the phrase which 
best describes the goals of the Publicity Com- 
mittee of Venango Campus. This committee 
plans the pictures for Venango's section in 
the Clarion Sequelle and writes articles £ot 
the Clarion Call. 

This year the committee chairman is Kathy 
Rodgers and assistant chairman is Pam 
Shorts. Other committee members include 
Cheryl dinger, Martha Dudrow, Mary Lynne 
Hunemny, Dan Moon, and Barb Winkler. 

Newspaper writers are; Andrea Accordi, 
Nancy Antonio, Sam Busco, Jean Casperseus, 
Sandy Kengerski, Linda Lacney, Sandy Mar- 
tin, Dorothy Mackey, Barb Stephen, Jill Will, 
Barb GhetU, Cindy Facciolo, Mike Lendon, 
Brian Mussleman, and Jim Zock. 

Yearbook aides include: Barb Branter, 
Joan C'elJ>s, Karen Mcrgaluski, Linda Steven- 
son, Jill Ware, Judy Wilson, Regina Wilson, 
Carol Carson, Madge McDonocy, and Lor- 
raine Kupanch. 

This year's typists are Linda Bogovich and 
Peggy O'Rourke. 

VC Will Participate in 
CSC Intramurals 

Tuesday, November 19, Venango Campus 
will send two table tennis teams to the main 
campus as part of the annual Clarion Intra- 
mural Program. 

Team I will consist of students who live 
al Montgomery Hall and Team II will be 
those students representing the commuters. 
Each team posted an entrance fee of |B.50 
with their applications, but this will be paid 
back upon completion of the tournament. 

Team I consists of John Shaffer, John Wil- 
iszowski, Jerry Krallinger, Larry Norris, 
Charles Bernett, Bill Beck. 

Team II consists of Dave La very, Lenny 
Abate, Bill Beggs, Larry Tinque, Larry Cum- 
mings, George Lopcr, Jim Greenfield, Ed 
Doleosh. 

The scoring system used for all matches 
is as follows; each team member plays a 
single match with one point going to ,the 
winner of the match. The teams accumulating 
the most points advance further in the compe- 
tition. Venango does not have a doubles team 
entered this year. Mr. Charles Nanz, head 
of all intramurals at the main campus, has 
not yet set a date for the finals. 

Freshmen Elect Officers 

This year's freshman class officers are: 
Don Tatar, president; Joetla Satkovich, vica. 
president; Jill Wagner, secretary; and Ray 
Pulcini, treasurer. 

These officers have been making plans for 
the year. On Sunday, November 24, a bonfire 
will be held in the parking lot. After the 
bonfire, there will be a presentation of skits 
by various dorm residents with a Thanksgiv- 
ing dance to follow. Still in the planning 
is a hayride. Many of the freshmen have 
also been talking about clearing a toboggan 
run and arranging co-ed swimming at the 
YMCA. 



Winkler is Elected 

On Friday, October 25, Barb Winkler was 
elected as a new Freshman class representa- 
tive to the Student Senate. Barb will take 
the place of Pat Moser and will act as chair- 
man of the Cultural Committee. 

Vietnam is Discussed 

A war in Vietnam that has been shelved 
as a major issue during much of the pre- 
sidential race came alive at a meeting of 
the Philosophes, Thursday, October 24, at 
Venango Campus. 



Participants in the discussion voiced dis- 
may that the Vietnam war, a vital issue 
in their minds, had been basically ignored 
hy all three candidates. 

Mr. Jay Van Bruggen, Associate Profes- 
sor of Political Science at Clarion State Col- 
lege, a gue.st participant, felt that there was 
no real issue between the candidates dealing 
with Vietnam. He said that other than Demo- 
cratic candidate Vice President Hubert Hum- 
phrey's coming out in favor of a bombing 
halt, all three presidential candidates were 
in agreement with the Johnson administra- 
tion's handling of the war in Vietnam. 

At one point during the talk about the 
Vietnamese situation a member of the group 
voiced an opinion that since the United States 
was in Vietnam our poUcy should be "fight 
to win." This attitude immediately sparked 
a controversy. Various participants in the 
discussion dispelled this view saying that the 
people of one country cannot occupy another 
country unless they are wanted. Along with 
this problem, a question of priorities was 
raised. 

Crawford Moderates 

Moderator Mr. Alistair Crawford, Assistant 
Professor of Social Sciences at Venango Cam- 
pus, questioned how the United States could 
wage a war in Vietnam while U.S. cities 
were burning. 

As a result of this discussion on Vietnam, 
some participants concluded that the U.S. 
should reorganize her foreign policy and per- 
haps through economic means stop commun- 
ism. 

The previous articles in the Call written 
about panel discussions on the main campus 
indicate the same pattern of participant re- 
action on law and order that was expressed 
during this meeting. Mr. Van Bruggen, com- 
menting on law and order, said that such 
an issue as this, is a complex issue dealing 
with four different phenomena; (1) an in- 
crease in crime according to FBI statistics, 
which arc misleading, (2) riots in the big 
cities, a totally different matter from crime 
in the streets, (3) campus demonstrations, 
and (4) crime in the streets. All of the areas 
of the law and order issue, Mr. Van Biniggen 
pointed out, are different kinds of problems 
with different solutions. Mr. Van Bruggen 
concluded that "law and order" is a phoney 
issue because the presidency has no power 
in dealing with local law enforcement 

Master of Education 
Is Now Available 
In Special Education 

The Special Education Department has de- 
veloped a graduate program which leads a 
graduate student to the Master of Education 
degree in speech pathology and it is being 
offered this semester for the first time at 
Clarion. Upon satisfactory completion of the 
program, the graduate is granted the state 
certificate as a speech correctionist and may 
apply for membership in the American 
Speech and Hearing Association and for the 
certificate of chnical competence issued by 
the association. 

The 30 credits needed for the Master of 
Education degree in speech pathology include 
24 credits in speech pathology and audio- 
logy, three in research, and three electives. 
The courses offered at Clarion through this 
program are Language Disorders, Articula- 
tion, Stuttering, Clinical Practice, and Inde- 
pendent Study. 

The United States Office of Education is 
financing the program at CSC with a $16,- 
600 grant. Financial assistance is also avail- 
able for graduate students interested in fur- 
thering their education by enrolling in this 
program. 




GRAI^D OPEI^ING 

The ]^EW Murphy's 



IN CLARION 
TWICE AS BIG — TWICE AS GOOD 



Wed. Nov. 13th - - 9:00 A.M 



If s a winning combination! Modern convenience, plus old fashioned friendli- 
ness and service. That's what you'll find at Murphy's store in Clarion— where 
the Grand Opening starts Wednesday, November 13th. And when you visit 
Murphy's completely remodeled store, be sure to fill out a coupon for one of the 
Big Give- Away Gifts. A Lady Schick Hair Dryer, AM-FM Radio or a Portable 
T.V. One of each of these will be given away Wednesday through Saturday. 
There's nothing to buy and you need not be present to win. Just fiU out a cou- 
pon DURING THE GRAND OPENING SALE, starting Wednesday at MUR- 
PHY'S in Clarion. 



G. C. Murphy Co. 



516 MAIN ST., CLARION, PA. 



iH 



Symphony Orchestra Participants 
Are Reviewed; Music Background 

4. 

Of Director Roncone Highlighted 



Edward Roncone, assistant professor of 
music and conductor of the Clarion Slate * 
College Symphony Orchestra, studied at the 
Music departments of Pennsylvania State Un- 
iversity and Carnegie-Mellon University, gra- 
duating from the latter with a degree in 
music and education. Upon graduation, he 
entered the military service and in 1941, he 
became Bandmaster of the 28th Infantry Divi- 
sion. Under the direction of Roncone, this 
outstanding unit made numerous concert ap- 
pearances throughout Europe and received 
the honor of being selected to lead the Al- 
lied Victory Parade in Paris. 

After his release from the Army, Mr. Ron- 
cone did graduate work at Carnegie- Mellon 
University and the Berkshire Music Center 
of Tanglewood where he studied orchestra 
conducting with Koussevitsky and Bernstein 
and choral conducting, opera and composi- 
tion with Ross, Shaw, Goldovsky, Copland 
and Milhaud. 

Roncone Conducts in Pittsburgh 

In Pittsburgh, he conducted the Federal 
Symphony Orchestra and was musical direc- 
tor of the Savoyards Opera Company and 
the Bach Choir. In 1950, he founded the But- 
ler County Symphony Orchestra and Sym- 
phony Chorus which he served as conductor 
and musical director for 13 years. 

In 1952, Mr. Roncone was one of 12 conduc- 
tors chosen throughout the United States to 
participate in the first conductor's sympo- 
sium held by Eugene Ormandy and the Phil- 
adelphia Symphony Orchestra. 

In 1953, he was designated "Man of the 
Year" by the United States Junior Chamber 
of Commerce, receiving its Distinguished Ser- 
vice Award for his organization and conduct- 
ing the Butler County Symphony. This orches- 
tra, in recognition of its musical and finan- 
cial success, was chosen in 1956 by the Ameri- 
can Symphony Orchestra League for study 
of its operating procedures to be used as 
a guide for other community orchestras. 

Mr. Roncone has taught in the Music de- 
partments of Carnegie- Mellon University. 
Geneva College, Chatham College, Indiana 
State University of Pa., and Clarion State 
College where he has been a faculty mem- 
ber since 1961. 

Lynne Mason, junior, is majoring in music 
and violin in the Liberal Arts program. A 
graduate of Avalon High School in Avalon, 
Pa., she began violin studies at 10 years 
of age and has studied with Angelo Gatto 
of Pittsburgh. 

Lynne has been a member of the Wilkins- 
burg Junior Symphony Orchestra for five 
years, the Wilkinsburg Senior Symphony Or- 
chestra for two years, and the Mount Mercy 
String Symphonetta for three years. For two 
years, she participated in the orchestra of 
the Kennerdell Arts Festival. 

Besides performing as a member of the 
Symphony Orchestra this past year, Lynne 



also participated in the orchestra for the 
Prama department's pnxluction of "The 
Sound of Music." She was also one of the 
soloists in a student recital presented by 
the music department. David Mallory is pre- 
sently her violin instructor. 

Nicolas Rutherford, senior, is majoring 
in Elementary Education. He attended the 
Borough Road Teacher's Training College in 
England for one and one-half years where 
he majored in art, played in the college 
orchestra, and was featured as a soloist in 
the performance of Bach's "Double Concer- 
to." 

In the fall of 19C6, he and his family moved 
to Uniontown, Pa. The following fall, he trans- 
ferred to Clarion State College and spent 
his sophomore year at the Venango Campus 
where he was one of the soloists in a student 
recital presented on that campus. This past 
year, Nicolas was a member of the Clarion 
State College Centennial Symphony Orchestra 
and was featured as one of the soloists in 
a student recital. 

Nicolas began studies in violin at the age 
of ten in Paraguay. South America, and pre- 
sently continues his studies with David Mal- 
lory. 

Matlack Studies Piano 

Jeanne Matlack, senior, majoring in Se- 
condary English, began her studies in piano 
under the guidance of her mother for nine 
years, and Mrs. Eileen Brown of Curwens- 
ville. Pa., for one year. She is presently 
a student of Mrs. Annette Roussel-Pesche. 

Thoi'gh her concentration has been primar- 
ily with the piano, Jeanne has manifested 
diversified interests in the area of music. 
She was a member of the Clarion State Col- 
lege Marching and Concert Band and the 
Symphony Orchestra as a French hornist. She 
also participated as a soprano in the Clarion 
State College Concert Choir and the Madrigal 
Singers. 

In addition to being a member of these 
performing organizations, Jeanne was assis- 
tant accompanist ior the Drama department's 
productions of "Oklahoma" and "The Sound 
of .Music," and performed as a soloist in 
a student recital presented by the Music de- 
partment this past year. 

In recognition of her talents, leadership 
and scholarship. Jeanne was recently elected 
to "Who's Who Among College Students." 



Library Advisor Speaks 

Mrs. Joyce B. Scholl, school library de- 
velopment advisor for the Pennsylvania De- 
partment of Public Instruction, visited Cla- 
rion State College last week to discuss the 
services of her office with library science 
students. 



I 




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Available in three colors — Gunsmoke, Houn' Dawg or Sage Brush 

CAMPUS SHOE STORE 

505 MAIN STREET 226-6625 CLARION, PA. 



Page 4 



THE CALL 



Clarion State College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



Friday, November 8, 1968 



Madrigals Are Performing 
For Area High Schools 




The Clarion State College Madrigal Sing- 
ers, under the direction of William M. Mac- 
Donald, are currently touring area high 
schools. On Thursday, they performed for 
the students of Clarion Area High School, 
New Castle High School, and Grove City High 
School, and today they sang for the Belle 
Lettres Club of Oil City. Wednesday, the sing- 
ers begin a more extensive, four-day tour 
which includes Riverside High School, Ell- 
wcK)d City and Freedom Area High School. 
November 14 and Ifi they will visit Monaca 
Boro High School, Mt. Lebanon High School, 
Farrell Senior High School, Hickory Hill High 
School, and Center Township High School. 

On Saturday, the college group will sing 
for musically exceptional young people of 



the Pittsburgh area at Duquesne University. 
The repertoire of the Madrigal Singers con- 
sists of "Grace, My Lovely One Fair Beau- 
ties," "Sweet Love Doth Now Invite," Orlan- 
do Gibbons' "The Silver Swan," and "Hosan- 
na to the Son of David." Others are two se- 
lections by John Bennet, "All Creatures Now 
Are Merry Minded" and "Weep O Mine 
Eye s," Feller's 'Wild Swans," Randall 
Thompson's "Alleluia," and three madrigals 
by Thomas Morley— "Now is the Month of 
Maying," "My Bonny Lass, She Smileth," 
and "Fire, Fire My Heart," and several oth- 
ers. 

In the future the Madrigal Singers will 
be performing for the Kiwanis and Rotary 
Clubs of Clarion. 



William Fateley Will Address 
Student Chemical Society Today 



Dr. William G. Fateley, assistant to the 
Vice President for Research at Mellon In- 
stitute in Pittsburgh, will address the Student 
Affiliate Chapter of the American Chemical 
Society on "Chemical Research Today" at 
their monthly meeting on Wednesday, at 7:30 
p.m. in Room 352 of Peirce Science Center. 

Dr. Fateley was born in Franklin, Indiana, 
and received an A. B. degree from Franklin 
College in 1951. He studied at Northwestern 
University for two years, and then trans- 
ferred to Kansas State University, where he 
completed requirements for the Ph.D. degree. 
Franklin College awarded him an honorary 
D.Sc. in 1965. ' ' '• 

Dr. Fateley was a Research Associate at 
the University of Maryland and a Research 
Fellow at the University of Minnesota before 
joining the James River Division of the Dow 
Chemical Company for three years as a Re- 
search Chemist and Head of the Spectroscopy 



Laboratory. He joined Mellon In.stitute in 1960 
and has received several promotions to ar- 
rive at his present position as a Senior Fellow 
and Assistant to the Vice President for Re- 
search. He also holds an appointment at Car- 
negie-Mellon University as Associate Profes- 
sor of Chemistry. 

Dr. Fateley's research interests are in in- 
frared spectroscopy and the structure of mat- 
ter. He is the Assistant Treasurer of the 
Pittsburgh Section of the American Chemical 
Society and Chairman of the Physical-Inor- 
ganic Group of the Section. He is a member 
of the Spectroscopy Society of Pittsburgh, 
Chemists' Club qf Pittsburgh, Alpha Chi Sig- 
ma, Sigma Xi, Pi Mu Epsilon, and Phi Lam- 
bda Upsilon. Dr. Fateley was the recipient 
*of the Coblentz Award in 1965. This award 
is given to an outstanding spectroscopist un- 
der 35 years old. 



Pennsylvania Offers Career 
Opportunities for Students 



"Pennsylvania's a psychedelightfiil state." 
Thus reads one of the slogans for the cam- 
paign being launched through the Department 



Future Flicks 



The James Bond thrillers, "From Russia 
with Love," and "Thunderball" will continue 
today and tomorrow at the Garby. Saturday 
and Sunday afternoons there will be showings 
of the outstanding biblical movie: "The Gos- 
pel According to Saint Matthew." Sunday 
evening will mark the arrival of "Doctor 
Faustus" starring Richard Burton in the title 
role and Elizabeth Taylor. 

"Speedway" will be next Wednesday's bar- 
gain night feature. This time Elvis Presley 
is assisted in the "Charlotte 600" by Nancy 
Sinatra. 

At the Orpheum. Albert Finney makes his 
directing debut with "Charley Bubbles" in 
which he also stars. Sunday night Debbie 
Reynolds and James Gamer struggle with 
the problems of contemporary parents in 
"How Sweet It Is." The bargain night movie 
will be 'In.spector Clouseau" in which Alan 
Arkin takes over the role created by Peter 
Sellers in "The Pink Panther" and "A Shot 
in the Dark." 



iof Commerce and the 100,000 Pennsylvanias. 

* The commonwealth is sponsoring a pro- 
gram designed to acquaint Pennsylvania's 
college and university students with the em- 
ployment opportunities within the common- 
wealth. This is being accomplished through 
an extensive advertising program and person- 
al visits to the campuses by a representative 
of the Department of Commerce. 

As a part of this program, Mr. Robert 
E. Hansen recently visited the Clarion cam- 
pus and met with the placement officer to 
help students understand the vast opportun- 
ities in Pennsylvania brought about by the 
tremendous growth in industry during the 
last few years. 

Card are available to request packets of 
information on Pennsylvania opportunities; 
these same cards will also be sent to a 
computer which will automatically send the 
names to over 4,000 different Pennsylvania 
industries. These cards can be picked up 
at the placement office in the Administration 
Building. 

Il you're serious about a career, learn more 
about Pennsylvania. It's now. 



Do your ChrLstmas shopping early. It's 
easy, if you buy Savings Bonds and Freedom 
Shares, available "over the counter" at your 
bank. 



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Workshop is Planned; 
Differing Cultures 
Will Discuss Problems 



An Intercultural Workshop, to be located 
in or near Pittsburgh, is scheduled for De- 
cember 26-29. It will include a group of 3.5 
African Students sponsored by the U.S. De- 
partment of Agriculture. Upperclass or grad- 
uate American students of all races are need- 
ed to participate in the program. A few par- 
tial travel grants will be available to parti- 
cularly needy students who live outside Wes- 
tern Pennsylvania. 

It is the purpose of the Intercultural Com- 
munications Workshop to bring together a 
number of individuals representing differ- 
ent cultures to consider communication pro- 
blems among people of differing cultural 
backgrounds. Most of the time will be devot- 
ed to small group discussions in which the 
participants will have an opportunity to ex- 
amine their own experiences and problems 
in intercultural communications; some time, 
however, will be given to lectures, exercises 
and films. 

Any CSC student who qualifies and is in- 
terested in attending this workshop should 
contact Dr. Konitzky, who is liaison officer 
for the Regional Council for International 
Education. 

Karasek Served 



As Moderator 



Eugene Kara.sek, assistant professor of His- 
tory, recently participated in a History For- 
um in Pittsburgh, which was conducted by 
the History Department of Duquesne Univer- 
sity. 

Mr. Karasek was the moderator for the 
topic, "Western Statesmen and Germany: Be- 
fore and After World War I," which was 
one of the ten areas covered during the four 
sessions of the two-day forum. Other areas 
discussed were Moslem Europe in the Mid- 
dle Ages, Twentieth Century American For- 
eign Policy, Elizabethan Politics, Bureaucra- 
cy—East and West, Historiography, Ancient 
History, American Constitutional History, 
Eastern Europe, and The Atlantic Trade. 

Main speaker was Arthur S. Link, editor 
of the Woodrow Wilson Papers, who is from 
Princeton University; his topic was "Wilson 
the Diplomatist in Retrospect." 

CSC Will Receive 
Matching Funds 

Clarion State College is one of 14 state- 
owned institutions of higher education to re- 
ceive matching funds from the Pennsylvania 
Higher Education Assistance Agency for 1968- 
69, with an amount of $81,037 allotted under 
the joint federal-state program. 

A total of $866,448 went to the state col- 
leges to enable these institutions to obtain 
available federal funds to provide financial 
assistance to needy and able students under 
the Educational Opportunity Grant, College 
Work-Study, and National Defense Student 
Loan programs. 

In August, PHEAA had announced that 
nearly $950,000 had been allocated by the 
General Assembly for matching funds. 

Kenneth R. Reeher, executive director of 
the PHEAA, said, "State monies used in 
the Educational Opportunity Grant program 
enable the college to secure three times the 
state advance in federal money which is used 
for grants to the low income student." 

"The state allocation for the College Work- 
Study program provides 20 percent of the 
student payroll and the federal government 
supplies the remaining 80 percent. Under the 
National Defense Student Loan program, a 
school may obtain ten times the state invest- 
ment. The availability of the state appropria- 
tion allows the maximum use of federal funds 
for Pennsylvania state-owned institutions," 
Mr. Reeher said. 

Each institution is responsible lor adminis- 
tration of the funds, selecting student reci- 
pients on the basis of financial need and 
academic promise. 

Faculty Senate 
Approves Change 
In Curriculum 

The Faculty Senate at a recent meeting 
approved a change in the business adminis- 
tration curriculum which will modify general 
education requirements. According to Dr. 
Daniel Shirey, chairman of the Senate, the 
purpose of the change is to substitute general 
blt>ck requirements in major discipline cate- 
gories by deleting references to specific cour- 
ses. 

The Senate also discussed a paper sub- 
mitted by Dean of Student Affairs conceraiag 
student rights and responsibilities. The paper 
was referred to the Student Affairs Cwnmit- 
tee for further study, and a recommendation 
was made that students on the constitutional 
committee of the Clarion Student Association 
be added to the Student Affairs Committee. 

The Senate also discussed the desirability 
of a curriculum committee and referred the 
matter to a committee for study and recom- 
mendations. 



U. S. Savings Bonds and Freedom Shares 
are "indestructible"— any that are lost, ^o- 
len, or destroyed will be replaced by the 
Treasury. 



Hun Judo Club 
Will Meet In 
Cleveland, Ohio 

The Clarion State College Hun Judo 
Club will be a member of a co-ed combina- 
tion team composed of the CSC Hun Judo 
Club, Jamestown, New York, and the Kit- 
tanning Judo Club. The three clubs will pro- 
vide a total of 50 contestants and will meet 
with the Greater Cleveland Judo Club, in 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

This will be the second occasion for the 
CSC Hun Judo Club's sixth year history, to 
enter into competition in the state of Ohio. 
The competition will be arranged according 
to three weight classes: 135 pounds, 175 
pounds, and unlimited, and also arranged 
according to four belt ranks: white, green, 
brown, and black. Mr. Harold Blanchard, 
the coach of the Forest City Judo Club, a 
very able black belt holder, is the host. The 
CSC Hun Judo Club will be presented by 
Professor P-Jobb, coach, and by Nick Gbur, 
team captain. The Jamestown, New York, 
team will be represented by Mr. Brad Won- 
derling, and the Kittanning Club by Mr. Har- 
old Keth. 

First and second place winners will re- 
ceive medals, and the team trophy will be 
taken by either Ohio or Pennsylvania. 

Enrollment Increases 
By 38 This Year 

Clarion State College enrollment for the 
1968-69 academic year stands at 3,203, an 
increase of 38 over last year, according to 
figures released this week by the Student 
Affairs office. 

Of this number, there were 684 men living 
in six residence halls and 1,251 women living 
in six residence halls on the Clarion campus. 

Students residing in state owned residence 
halls totaled 743, while those living in private 
residence halls on the Clarion and Venango 
campuses totaled 1,004 and 188, respectively. 

Clarion campus students living in fraternity 
houses totaled 79. Student teachers living off- 
campus in the various communities providing 
for their training numbered 346. 

Another 496 students were living off-campus 
in private homes or other facilities in Clarion 
and Venango. Commuters to the two cam- 
puses totaled 347. 

Art Students Producing 
Mural for Student Union 

Students enrolled in Art 551, Advanced Cre- 
ative Art, are producing a mural as part of 
their course work this semester. Following 
completion, the mural is to be placed in 
the Commons area of the Student Union. 

The idea of a wall painting originated with 
the class. It was felt that exploration of 
the mural form would be a valuable exper- 
ience for the group and also provide an op- 
portunity for a graduate contribution in help- 
ing to enrich College facilities. The class 
this semester includes Mrs. Margaret Oakes, 
a teacher in Brookville; Miss Linda Lee Wil- 
son, a teacher at Union Jt. Schools, Miss 
Patricia Howell, a teacher at Clarion-Lime- 
stone, Mrs. Carol Ann Chapman, an art teach- 
er in Knox, Miss Lynn Campbell, presently 
student teaching at Clarion, and Mr. Richard 
Mitchell who serves as art teacher of the 
Victory Heights Schools near Franklin. All 
students, except one, a graduate of a profes- 
sional art school, received their undergrad- 
uate work at Clarion. 

Instructor for the class is Professor Joseph 
R. Spence, Head of the Art Department. 

'J. B; Goes to Temple 

The College Readers are traveling this 
weekend to Temple University's Oral Inter- 
pretative Reading Festival. There John Solo- 
mon, George Hall, Steve Brezzo, Lorraine 
Martin, Ken Miller and Sue Albanesi will 
present their production of J. B. in competi- 
tion with a number of other institutions. 





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Friday, November 8, 1968 



THE CALL — Clarion State College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



Page 5 



A PEEK AT 



CSC Band Loses 13 Members 



ALPHA SIGMA TAU 

The sisters of Alpha Smma Tau want to 
congratulate one ol their pledges, Cathy 
Stinard, who is a member of the CSC debat- 
ing team. She helped our team win three out 
of five matches last weeltcnd. 

This year we have a new system for 
pledges to get fraternity signatures. Each 
week the pledges must get at least fifteen 
sigoaturcs on their paddles from one par- 
ticular fraternity. The "AST Fraternity of 
the Week" is chosen from a random drawing. 
This past week, Theta Chi was picked. This 
coming week, the pledges. will have to obtain 
signatures from the brothers of Phi Sigma 
Gpsil<m. 

Our Founders Day Weekend was a com- 
plete success. A special thanks goes out to 
Sister Barbara Day, who planned the hay- 
ride. Nobody got much sleep Saturday night 
when the sisters and pledges had a slumber 
party at the AST suite in Forest Manor. The 
sisters want to thank Mr. P-Jobb for his in- 
teresting talk he gave Monday night at our 
banquet. 

Again this year, our social service project 
will be visiting the people at the Clarion 
Convalescent Home. We hope to bring a 
little happiness into their lives, especially 
during the holiday season. 

THETA XI 

The brothers would like to send out a be- 
lated thanks to the sisters of Delta Zeta, 
Sigma Sigma Sigma, and Zeta Tau Alpha 
for singing at and hostessing our rush party. 

At this time the brothers of Theta Xi would 
like to announce their pledge class. The 
pledges are: Gary McMonagle, president; 
Jim Greer, Don Kinsely, Chuck Saponsky, 
Dennis Weaver, Phil Lozovoy, Ron Friedel, 
Shelly Pugrant, Ed Golembiesky, Tom Som- 
ers, Steve Nice, Gary Grubich, Jim Mondale, 
Ray Ryaceski, Jim Hayes, Ron Zembruski, 
Pob Flaus, Earl Zerfoss, Jerry Clemens, and 
Rafial Diaz. Best of luck to you, pledges. 
These pledges are under the competent direc- 
tion of Pledgemaster Bab Dragovich and his 



capable assistants, John Zahorn and Rich 
Mihalic. 

Congratulations to Brother Jerry Zary on 
becoming lavalicred to Miss Kathy Jones. 

The brothers are chartering a bus to Slip- 
pery Rock so that they can support our team 
in full force. 

ALPHA GAMMA PHI 

The brothers of red and black are proud 
to have taken the following pledges: Tom 
Komcnda, Jackie Irwin, Leo Valesak, Ralph 
Marasia, Jim Weisenberger, Dave James, 
Greg Kellick, Joe Filia, George McGary, 
Chuck Koval, Leo Vrcek, Brad Whoolery, 
Mike Campayno, Dan Ranieri, Jim Frontino, 
Jack McGowan, Bob Doney, Chuck Wolfe, 
Sonny Paslowski, Louie Musante, Gary De- 
carlo, and Ed Lochinger. 

This year's pledge theme is "Parris Is- 
land," and the brothers are sure Pledgemas- 
ter Bill Botti will make real Gammas from 
them. 

Congratulations to the brothers who won 
their section of the intramural football lea- 
gue by thrashing the Sig Taus. 

To those who helped make our dance at 
Chandler a near success, thanks, and to 
those who didn't^you shouldn't complain 
about those nothing-to-do weekends. 

Many thanks to the sisters of Sigma Sigma 
Sigma, Zeta Tau Alpha, Delta Zeta, and es- 
peciaUy Alpha Sigma Tau for their fine 
singing at our smoker. 

ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA 

The Alpha Sigs are getting into full swing 
with their money-making project. They want 
to remind everyone that perfume is the per- 
fect gift for any occasion, and that one dol- 
lar is never too much to spend on a friend. 

Congratulations go to Sister Betsy Feld- 
man, who was initiated last week into the 
language fraternity. Alpha Mu Gamma. 

This weekend many members of Alpha 
Sigma Alpha plan to spend some time with 
the Alpha Sigs from Slippery Rock. The sit- 
uation should be tense with the two chapters 
cheering for opposite teams, but the party 



Delta Lambda Tau Takes Root; 
Girls Are Busy Planning Activities 



This year CSC welcomes a new sorority 
to the campus. Hoping to get more girls in- 
terested in sororities, last May a group of 
girls asked the PanfielTenic Council fo"r per- 
mission to form a new sorority. The result 
was the founding of the Delta Lambda Tau 
on a local basis. A constitution was drawn 
up three weeks ago; now Delta Lambda Tau 
is a member of the Panhellenic Council, on 
probation until April or until they are nation- 
ally affiliated. At the present time, they are 
waiting to hear from the National Council of 
Alpha Xi Delta, which is considering an ex- 
pansion program to include Clarion State 
College. 

Now that the Delta Lambda Taus are or- 
ganized, they are planning activities. Each 
girl will spend several hours a month doing 
therapy with children with cerebral palsy. 
On Thursday the sorority will sponsor a 
slave day to raise money for their national 
charter. 

FHor to sorority fall rush, the Delta Lamb- 
da Taus consisted of 11 members who built 
a float for Homecoming and ushered as a 



An Enthusiastic Student 
Casts Ballot in Election 



sorority for the Homecoming game. 

Under tiie direction of Miss Roxanne Plapp, 
instructor of Speech, the Delta Lambda Taus 
have 31 members, which includes the 20 
pledges. The officers and members are: 

President, Ginny Elish; vice-president, Jo- 
anne Meckley; secretary, Judy Mannozzi; 
treasurer, Linda Beres; historian, Linda 
Giesmann; corresponding secretary, Sandy 
Covel; Panhellenic active, Bonnie AUwein; 
Panhellenic silent, Fran Muczynski; social 
chairman, Marilyn Mortichesky; service pro- 
ject, Lynn Hannold; scholarship chairman, 
Sally .Weeter. 

Pledges: Susan Rodella, Sandy Young, Pat 
Backus, Dianne Best, Cheryl Bryner, Mary 
Burke, Dianna Cherry, Kathy Connwie, Mar- 
cia Evanko, Jill Fricker, Millie Gasper, Peg- 
gy Kiskaddon, Jeannie OHop, Judy Selker, 
Cay Weldon, Chris Wynkoop, Michele McCaf- 
ferty, Janie Hall, Charlene Pfar.nenschmidt, 
and Janet Kochin. 



sponsored by friends at Slippery Rock will 
be fun. The Alpha Sigs hope to see strong 
student support at Clarion's last game. 

The best of luck goes to Sister Louise Kish 
and teammates from Clarion who play 
against the volleyball team of Indiana. 

DELTA ZETA 

Congratulations to a pledge. Donna Sacco, 
and to a sister, Pam Grantham, who were 
recently initiated into Delta Lambda chapter 
of Alpha Mu Gamma honorary language so- 
ciety. 

Our pledges are progressing nicely in their 
pledge period under the capable direction of 
Vicki Wilcox, pledge mistress. 

On October 30, the sisters of Delta Zeta 
went trick-or-treating in Clarion for the bene- 
fit of the patients at Polk Hospital. The girls 
collected many treats which were immedi- 
ately sent to the hospital, and which helped 
make a brighter day for the people there. 

SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA 

The Tri Sigs are selling shaker sweaters. 
If you want one, you can contact any Tri 
Sig, They come in navy, maroon, green, and 
black. The cost is a three-dollar deposit and 
eight dollars payable upon receipt of the 
merchandise. 

Purple violets to Sister Janet Price for 
being named best pledge in her pledge class. 
Also, congratulations to Janet on her pin- 
ning to Joe Harrington, Sigma Pi pledge at 
East Stroudsburg State College. 

A special thanks to the pledges for honor- 
ing the sisters with the donkey cart, and 
pumpkin they worked so diligently to ac- 
quire. 

ZETA TAU ALPHA 

Sunday evening, our pledge class received 
their "big sisters." Alter the ceremony all 
the sisters and our patronesses mfet at the 
Diner for pie and coffee. 

The new Zeta sextet has been chosen.. The 
members are: Susie Loucks, Michol Sam, 
Bev Lechner, Linda Ferris, Bobbi Egidi, and 
Janet Steis. The alternate is Ruth Hodson. 

The pledge class elected its officers. Bobbi 
Egidi is president, Sara Cox is secretary, 
and Carm FuciUo is junior Panhellenic repre- 
sentative. Diane Wilson is the sophomore 
inactive representative to the Panhellenic 
Council. They also enjoyed a day of being 
Alpha Gamma Phi pledges. 

Best wishes and Zeta love to Kathy Johns, 
on her rerent engagement to Ron Darragh. 

Pins, Rings and Bells 

PINS 

Jack Moravetz, TKE, to Peggy M^Cauley, 
ZTA. 

RINGS 

Bob Wynkoop to Marg Butler, CSC. 




DELTA LAMBDA TAU 

Members and pledges of Delta Lambda 
Tau will have a Slave Day on Saturday to 
raise money to become a national sorority. 
They will be "sold" to do household and out- 
of-doors tasks for a minimum of one dollar 
per hour. 

Please call 226-9565 (Miss Roxanne Plapp, 
advisor), or 226-9988 (Ginny Ehsh, Room 
253), or 226-9992 (Bonnie Allwein or Sandy 
Covel, Room 319) by Thursday in order to 
reserve a slave. 



IT ISN'T HARD to guess who Jim Mul- 
len voted for as he actively supported 
his candidate in the mock presidential 
election. 



ALPHA XI DELTA 

Alpha Xi Delta alumnae willing to help 
sponsor the Delta Lambda Tau Sorority in 
joining the national sorority are urged to 
contact Miss Roxanne Plapp. advisor. 226- 
9565. or Ginny Elish, president, 226-9988. 




Sitar Concert 
Held Monday 
In CSC Chapel 

Nikhil Banerjee, India's great sitarist, and 
Kanai Dutta, his tabla player, performed last 
Monday in the Chapel. 

Banerjee's concert consisted of an Alap 
in 15 parts followed by slow and fast Gats. 
For this piece, the sitar and tabla were ac- 
companied by the tamboura. This piece lasted 
approximately 50 minutes. The second selec- 
tion was a drum solo performed by Kanai 
Dutta. The third piece was a light classical 
Raga performed on the sitar and tabla and 
accompanied by the tamboura. 

Nikhil Banerjee was born in Calcutta in 
1931. He received his first music lesson from 
his father, Jithendranath Banerjee, who is 
also a well-known sitarist. At the All Bengal 
Sitar Competition, Nikhil, although he was 
only nine, received the highest honor. In 1942, 
he played for the All India Radio for five 
years. Banerjee was accepted as a disciple 
and for seven years studied in Maihar with 
Allauddin Khan. 

In 1954, Banerjee's first appearance after 
his retreat was enthusiastically received. 
Since that time, Banerjee has been playing 
at concerts and festivals around the world. 

Banerjee is a professor at the Ali Akbar 
College of Music in Calcutta. 



THE SENIOR MEMBERS of the Clarion tjlate (Joilcge uoiaeu 
Eagles' Marching Band were honored last Saturday during 
the pre-game musical presentation at the annual Parents 
Day program. 



Band Honors Parents at Program 



The fangs of the cobra are smaller than 
those of the rattlesnake, but its venom is 
more toxic. 



Last Saturday, the members of the Ga- 
rion State College Golden Eagle Marching 
Band, along with the members of the football 
team, welcomed their parents to the campus 
for the annual Parents Day event. The 235 
parents of band Members were treated to cof- 
fee and donuts at 10 a.m., and lunch at 11:30 
at Chandler Dining Hall and finally the Cla- 
rion-Shippensburg football game. The mem- 
bers of the band presented their mothers 
with a pompon corsage decorated with blue 
and gold ribbons. The parents also witnessed 
a short practice' session of the band prior 
to the game. 

The pre-game musical presentation ack- 
nowledged the visiting parents with appro- 
priate formations and music. Before the play- 
ing of the Alma Mater the following seniors, 
making their fmal appearance at Clarion 
Memorial Stadium, were asked to step for- 
ward to be recognized: 

Ron Allaman, Carolyn Banjak, Donna Bic- 
kerstaff. Bill Chessman, Chris Daniels, Clint 
Doolittle, Brenda Falstick, Terry Graham, 
Janice Hoffman, Sam Itzoe, Ray Jenkins, 
Carolyn Johnson, Don Kress, Lenny Mitchell, 
Glenn Murphy, Margery Olson, Cortez Pur- 
year, Connie Schrecongost, Tom Seng, Dave 
Weihle, Donna \4^olfinger. 

The half-time performance was centered 
around a "New York theme" and featured 
special musical arrangements by Mr. Mit- 
chell and Mr. Hardin, both members of the 
Clarion music staff. During the playing of 
the final selection, "Slaughter on 10th Ave- 
nue," th-ee percussionists were featured solo- 
ists. They were Ken McNulty, a freshman 
from Pittsburgh, Ronnie Nash, a sophomore 
from North East, and Tom Seng, a senior 
from Pittsburgh. 

According to the many favorable comments 



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regarding the line marching and musical per- 
formance of the band, this final appearance 
of the season was received extremely well. 
The CSC Golden Eagle Marching Band is 
one of the largest marching units among 
the colleges and universities of Pennsylvania, 
outnumbered only by the Penn State Blue 
Band. This numerical factor, along with the 
excellent musical performances, places the 
Marching Band among 'he very best — a fact 
of which the students of Clarion should be 
proud. The familiar sight of the blue and 
white clad band members starting out from 
behind the stand to play "The Star-Spangled 
Banner," with a rich, sonorous, musical 
sound, has become a tradition during this 
marching band season. 

The pride with which the band members 
wear their uniforms is also extended to their 
musicianship, their conduct, and their ap- 
pearance. This, coupled with the fine leader- 
ship of Cortez Puryear, drum major, Janice 
Hoffman, Golden Girl, and Dorothy Lawry 
and Connie Schrecongost, co-head majorettes, 
made the 1968 marching band season the 
best in the history of the band. 



TO HOLD ROAD FUNDS 

Secretary of Transportation Alan S. Boyd 
has announced that $600-million in Federal 
highway money would be held back to fight 
inflation during this calendar year.* 



Clarion Graduates 
Of 1968 Choose i 
Variety of Johs 

In a report concerning student teaching 
and placement for 19()7-68, Dr. Ralph Sheriff 
named three conditions present during 1968 
which affected placement patterns at Clarion 
State nnd other colleges. Dr. Sheriff is assis- 
tant director. 

The variety of job opportunities last year 
allowed much freedom of choice for the stu- 
dents. A large number of on campus inter- 
views had to be cancelled because the stu- 
dents apparently chose a specific area and 
concentrated on the schools of their choice 
in that area. 

Unwilling to wait action on the teacher 
salary bill for Pennsylvania, many students 
accepted positions in other states. 

With an increase in available financial aid, 
a greater number of students, especially wo- 
men, entered graduate school. Many men, 
due to the uncertain military situation, were 
prevented from accepting gra Juate school op- 
portunities. 

Degrees: 527 baccalaureate degrees were 
granted by Clarion State College between 
September 1, 1967. and August 30, 1968. Fifty- 
eight percent of these are women; and forty- 
two percent are men. Two hundred twenty 
nine degrees were granted in secondary ed- 
ucation (43.5 percent), 183 in elementary ed- 
ucation (34.6 percent), 54 in liberal arts (10- 
2 percent), and the remaining 61 (11.7 per- 
cent) were granted in library science, speech 
pathology and audiology, and special educa- 
tion. 

Job openings: Between September 1967 and 
September 1968, 29,488 notices of job oppor- 
tunities were listed in the placement office. 
This is more than twice the number listed 
in the previous year. The majority of these 
opportunities were in elementary and secon- 
dary education. 

Placement: Nearly 100 percent of all gra- 
duates who registered with the placement 
office have been provided with jobs. Ninety- 
two percent of all 1967-68 graduates have 
reported back to the placement office. Over 
seven percent have entered graduate school. 

Eighty percent of all teachers who took 
jobs, took positions in Pennsylvania. Ninety- 
six percent of these teachers settled in the 
western part of the state. 

The average teaching salary was $5,749, a 
figure which should have been higher, but 
January graduates entering on last year's 
salary scale tended to lower the average. 

Fifty-eight students accepted placement in 
other states. New York, Ohio, and Florida 
were the favorite states, with Michigan and 
Maryland close behind. 








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Page 6 



THE CALL — Clarion State College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



Friday, November 8, 1968 



SHIPPENSBVRG GAME 



Golden Eagles Hold Raiders 
Scoreless in 35-0 Victory 



The Golden Eagles returned to the winning 
track with a 350 victory over Shippensburg 
on the arm of sophomore quarterback Bob 
Erdeljac, who threw for 228 yards and three 
touchdowns, and scored one himself. 

In the first quarter, Clarion tallied the first 
time they had the ball when Ihey took over 
after a 15-yard punt on the Shippensburg 
38. They drove the 38 yards in nine plays 
and the drive was capped by a 12-yard touch 
down pass from Erdeljac to Rick Terza. John 
Dorish kicked the extra point; thie score at 
the end of the first quarter was Clarion 7, 
Shippensburg 0. 

In the second quarter, Clarion drove 82 
yards in 14 plays with Jim Becker plunging 
over from the one-yard line for the score. 
Dorish again kicked the extra point. The 
score at this time was Clarion 14, Shippens- 
burg 0. 

Late in the second quarter, Shippensburg 
took over after an Erdeljac pass was picked 
off at the Clarion 49. They drove to the 
Clarion 2, where they fumbled the ball and 
Tom Humphrey recovered it. Nine plays la- 
ter, Erdeljac threw to Jim Becker for a 
50-yard touchdown pass in the closing minutes 
of the second quarter. Dorish added the extra 
point to give Clarion a 21-0 lead at half-time. 

Early in the third quarter, Clarion's fierce 
defense stopped a Shippensburg fourth down 
attempt for a first down at the Shippensburg 



44. Clarion drove the 44 yards in five plays 
with the drive capped by a 40-yard pass 
from Erdeljac to Becker. Clarion then inter- 
cepted a Ba urn garner pass at the Shippens- 
burg 18: seven plays later Erdeljac carried, 
the ball over from the two-yard line, Clarion's 
final score. Dorish added the extra point, 
making the score at the end of the third 
quarter Clarion 35. Shippensburg 0. 

In the fourth quarter. Clarion's defense 
stopped the Shippensburg offense on the 
ground, holding them to minus 26 yards. Mid- 
way through the qiuirtcr. Coach Al Jacks 
substituted freely, and the reserves turned 
in a favorable job, showing the potential that 
can only add to Clarion s defense next year. 

Clarion's stout defense again proved itself 
the best in the conference, giving up only 
170 yards in the air and none on the ground. 
This limited the Red Raiders' offense to a 
mere 170 yards total offense as compared 
to the Golden Eagles' 415-yard offensive 
gain. 

Clarion's victory over Shippensburg virtual- 
ly assured a second place for the Eagle 
squad in the V^'cstern Conference standings 
of the State College Conference. With a 3-1 
conference record and a 5-3 overall tally, 
Clarion travels tomorrow to Slippery Rock 
for the final game to close out the 1968 
football sea.son. 



GAME STATISTICS 

Clarion Shippensburg 

16 Total First Downs 16 

187 Net Yards Rushing 

37 Passes Attempted 33 

16 Passes Completed 12 



1 Passes Had Intercepted 

228 Yards Gained Passing 

415 Total Offense Yardage 

9 Total Number of Penalties 

51 







Yards Penalized 

Number of Fumbles 

Fumbles Lost 

SCORE BY QUARTERS 



1 
170 
170 

6 
49 

3 

2 



Shippensburg 0— 

Clarion 7 14 14 0—35 

SCORING 

Clarion: Terza (12-yard pass from Erdel- 
jac), Dorish kick. 

Clarion: Becker (one-yard run), Dorish 
kick. 

Clarion: Becker (50-yard pass from Erdel- 
jac), Dorish kick. 

Clarion: Becker (40-yard pass from Erdel- 
jac), Dorish kick. 

Clarion: Erdeljac (two-yard run), Dorish 
kick. 



Clarion Will Face 
Tough Game Tomorrow 

Tomorrow. Clarion travels to Slippery Rock 
for the final game of the season to play 
a team which has shown .steady Improvement 
in recent weeks. They have won two of their 
last three games. They have a crushing 
ground attack and could make it tough on 
the Clarion defense. Clijsing the season with 
a win could prove difficult for Clarion State. 

Wagner at six fool, 206 pounds, is a power- 
ful runner for the Rockets. He is the work- 
horse of their rushing attack. The No. 21 on 
his back is the figure to watch. Ross, num- 
ber 14, weighing 190 pounds, and standing 
six foot, three, has great speed; he will keep 
and run. Pearl at five-ten, 175 pounds, is 
Ross' favorite receiver. 

On defense, Allen, five-nine and 190 pounds, 
is a tough blocker. Number 26, Franjione 
is five-eight, 165 pounds; he plays on the 
wing and is a dangerous pass defender. 

The Slippery Rock 11 commonly assembles 
in the Slot East-I. Their passing attack is 
limited to short hooks, swings, and look-ins. 
A quarterback sneak is a favorite rushing 
play for short yardage. 

Defensively they like to loop and blitz up 
the middle; they come hard on passing at- 
tempts. They maintain a goal line defense 
of 6-5. 

Coach AI Jacks probably won't vary Cla- 
rion's normal attack very much from pre- 
vious games. He will probably work the left 
side of the line a little more on rushing plays. 
Erdeljac can be expected to send his ends 
out, and balance the offense by running his 
backs equal time. 



Marching Band Will Present 
Second Annual Revue Thurs, 



On Thursday, the CSC Golden Eagle March- 
ing Band will present its second annual 
Marching Band Revue in ihe Waldo Tippin 
Gymnasium. This event, which is presented 
to give many people the opportunity to see 
and hear the Marching Band under more 
favorable conditions, is sponsored by the, Mu- 
sic Department. The program consists of 
marches, original compositions and ait the 
music presented during the half-time shows 
of the home football games. 

This Revue was conceived due to the many 
requests by students and faculty to hear the 
band perform the music which is presented 
each Saturday on the gridiron. In addition 
to the playing of the music the majorettes 
will present twirling routines to selections 
especially written for their twirling show- 
manship. 

Special arrangements by Mr. Mitchell and 
Mr. Hardin will be performed. Mr. Rex Mit- 
chell, assistant professor of music at Clarion, 
has composed and arranged for the past three 
years and has had several compositions pub- 
lished by Edward B. Marks and Charies Colin 
Publishing Companies of New York. Prior 
to coming to Clarion, Mr. Mitchell was the 
Director of Music at a school system with 



an enrollment of 8,000 pupils. Also he directed 
performing groups in Ohio, as well as par- 
ticipating in professional organizations there. 
In 1985, he gained membership in the Ameri- 
can School Band Directors Association which 
is respected for the development of fine high 
school bands. 

Mr. Burton Hardin, a newcomer to the 
music staff this year, has had extensive train- 
ing in composing and arranging at Kansas 
State Teachers College, University of Wichi- 
ta, and University of Oklahoma. Previously, 
he served as Director of Bands at a school 
system in Kansas and was an instructor at 
the University of South Carolina. He is a 
member of the American Federation of Musi- 
cians, as well as several other music asso- 
ciations. 

Dr. Stanley F. Michalski, who is in his 
seventh year as Director of Bands at CSC, 
came to Clarion after serving as band direc- 
tor in several bands in Pennsylvania. He 
also served as assistant director of the Penn 
State Marching and Concert Blue Band. 

Everyone is invited to attend this musical 
event which highlights the music of the 
marching band. There is no admis.sion charge 
for the revue which starts at 8 p.m. 



Many fertile farms dot the landscape of 
Bedford County. 



Among outstanding industries in Elk County 
are the production of paper and leather 
goods. 



Clarion's 1968 Golden Eagle Football Squad 




To Meet the Rockets in the Final Conference Game 



A BIG HALF-PRICE 
PAPERBACK SALE! 

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• Only one to three of each title available, so come early for a 
good choice. 

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Penguin, Harper Torch Books, Vintage, and others. 

• All books are new, shelf worn or fine used. 

• Don't miss this Golden Opportunity to save money and stock 
your personal library. 

• OVER 1500 PAPERBACKS ON SALE — Hundreds of titles 
covering nearly all subjects. 

Savb 50% 

SPECIAL ADDED BARGAINS ... One group of miscellaneous 
Hard Cover Books — Art, Science, Fiction, and General Interest. 
Not half price but they carry substantial discounts. Great for 
Gifts! 

AT THE 

College Book Store 



Player of the Week 



Bob Erdeljac, who had one of his finest 
games of the sea.son last Saturday against 
Shippensburg, was the choice of the coaching 
staff of the Golden Eagles for the player-of- 
the-week award. 

Bob put together a fine offensive attack, 
compiling 228 yards in the air and an addi- 
tional 36 yards on the ground, in moving 
Clarion to its sixth win of the season. After 
eight games, Bob has compiled an average 
of 196 yards per game; he ranks in both 
the NCAA and the NAIA in total offense. 
Bob connected on 16 of his 31 passes, hurling 
for three touchdowns and running for another. 

With the graduation of Jim Alcorn last 
May, there was a big gap to be filled at 
quarterback. Bob had a fine year as quarter- 
back of the freshman squad, but whether 
he would be able to handle himself under 
varsity competition was a question mark. One 
of the biggest things working against a young 
quarterback is the ghost of inexperience, 
something that can haunt a player into mak- 
ing mistakes, which, could end up in missed 
plays, interceptions, or a lost set of downs. 

A good team requires a quarterback who 
can take charge of the situation before it 
gets the best of him. This is the type of 
ability Bob has: it cannot be taught. Bob 
is a quiet person, but on the field he is 
a born leader, a take-charge guy who is 
respected by the other players. 

Commenting on his reasons for selecting 
Bob, Coach Al Jacks said, "Bob has been 
working up to this game since the season 
opener against Mansfield. Every game he 
gets progressively better. Bob has a fine 
future ahead of him." 

Since Erdeljac has two years to go here 
at Clarion. Coach Jacks has found someone 
who can fill the shoes of Jim Alcorn, and 
establish himself as one of Clarion's finest 
quarterbacks. 




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and CROOKS SHOES 
has them 

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CASUAL.S 



BOB ERDEUAC 



ON CREDIT PROTECTION 

The Hou.se has passed a bill that would 
give customers and borrowers an explanation 
of the interest and other finance charges they 
sign for. The bill is known as the "Consum- 
er Credit Protection Act." 



CHIKOSKY'S 
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MAIN STREET 



CLARION 





Vol. 40, No. 8 



CLARION STATE COLLEGE — CLARION, PENNSYLVANIA 



Friday, November 15, 1968 



Students Rehearse for All-School Play 



COPELAND IS DIRECTOR 




'Herr Biedermann alld Firebugs' 
Will Be Presented HeXi Week; 
Psychedelic Atmosphere Prevails 



Rehearsals continue this weekend for the 
llerr Biedermann and the Firebugs, the se- 
cond major production of the semester by 
the Department of Speech and Dramatic Arts. 

The Max Frisch play, directed by Robert 
Copeland, as.sociate professor of speech, will 
be presented next Wednesday. Thursday, Fri- 
day, and Saturday evenings at 8:30 p.m. in 
the college chapel. Tickets may be obtained 
by students in the chapel weekday afternoons 
in exchange for their remaining student thea- 
ter passes. 

The play itself is concerned with the pro- 
blems faced by Herr Biedermann (Ken Mil- 



ler) and h.s household (Cookie Smilh, his 
wife, and Betty Ferguson, maid) when they 
acquire some "guests" (John Dori.sh, Steve 
Brezzo, and Phil Ross). Living in a world 
of fear and suspicion, Gottlieb Biedermann 
(Everyman) does not know how to deal with 
these "strangers." 

An integral part of the play is the chorus 
of student protesters who serve much the 
same purpose as a chorus in a classic Greek 
Drama, i.e., serving as the spokesmen for 
the public or audience, and commenting on 
the action on stage. The chorus members 



are: George Hall, the leader. Herb Michaels, 
Gary Daurora, Chris Mas.sena, Bob Heimann, 
Dan Speal. Willie Sanders. Paul Galfney, 
and Mike Elliot (the last six are pictured 
above). 

This production is enhanced by a generally 
psychedelic atmosphere. Some scenes will be 
accompanied by the music of The Scarlet 
Pumpernickels, a popular rock group. In ad- 
dition, there will be strobe and colored lights, 
incense and peppermint. As Lennon and Mc- 
Cartney say, "A splendid time is guaran- 
teed for all." 



OPINION POLL 



Clarion Students 



PICTURED ABOVE are Dan Speal, Bob Heimann, Chris 
Massena, Willie Sanders, Paul Gaffney, and Mike Elliot. 
They are expressing one of the themes of youth in their 



luies at. student protesters in the chorus of "Herr Bied- 
ermann and the Firebugs." 



Should Library, Union Hours Attend Convention 
Be Extended? Students Give 



In Denver, Colorado 



Freshman Debaters Take Fire Breaks Out Positive and Negative Remarks 



First Place in Two -Man 
Switch-Sides Division Event 



Fourteen Clarion State first-year debaters 
competed with debaters from a dozen visit- 
ing colleges in a novice tournament held 
on the Clarion campus last weekend, with 
two Clarion freshmen taking first place in 
the two-man switch-sides division. 

Clarion's best record was compiled by Bar- 
ry McCauliff, Johnstown, and Karla Jantsch, 
Baden, with a record of five wins and no 
losses. On the way to their first-place finish, 
McCauliff and Jantsch recorded wins over 
Temple, Villanova, Duquesne, Buffalo and 
the University of Pittsburgh. 

With Clarion debaters ineligible for awards 
in their own tourney, the first-place trophy 
went to the University of Pittsburgh in the 
two-man division. Pitt's record was 4-2, with 
Villanova taking second honors on a 3-3 re- 
cord. 

A second Clarion team debating in the two- 
man division had good enough records for 
second place had they been eligible for 
awards. They were Judy Rosensteel, Elders 
Ridge, and Sue Knowles, New Castle, who 
were 3-2 with wins over Villanova, Duquesne, 
and Buffalo, and losses to Temple, and Pitt. 

In the four-man division, ten other Clarion 



debaters compiled a composite record of 11 
wins and 5 losses. This division was Vfon 
by Pitt with an 8-0 record. West Virginia 
took second place with 6-2. 

The Clarion team of Jim Rarick, New 
Brighton; Judy McAuley, Pittsburgh; Rebec- 
ca Kasper, Munhall, and Lillian Pfaff, Cla- 
rion, finished with a 6-2 record to tie for 
second place. Rarick and McAuley had wins 
over Edinboro, Akron and Pitt at Johnstown, 
and a loss to first-place Pitt. Kasper and 
Pfaff had wins over Kutztown, Thiel and 
Slippery Rock, and a loss to Susquehanna. 

A second Clarion unit divided debates 
among several debaters, finishing 5-3. Bob 
Banks, Ambridge, and Frank Falso, Corao- 
polis, had wins over two Edinboro teams, 
and debated against second-place West Vir- 
ginia in the final round of the toiu*nament. 

On the negative for Clarion's fourth-place 
team, Jetta Gilligan, Coalport, and Eileen 
McGinley, Pittsburgh, were 2-0, with wins 
over Slippery Rock and Thiel. Al Carraway, 
Grausville, and Diane Schulheiss, Newark, 
Del., were 1-1, defeating Akron and losing 
to first-place University of Pittsburgh. 



Becht Hall Group Presents 



In Peirce Hall 

Fire broke out in Peirce Science Center 
on Wednesday morning when the motor of 
an air pump to an aquarium overheated. 

A passerby on Greenville Avenue apparent- 
ly spotted the fire at 7:30 a.m. and reported 
it to the school. Mrs. Muriel Shea, switch- 
board operator, immediately contacted the 
Clarion Volunteer Fire Company, which re- 
sponded in a matter of minutes. Paul Deemer 
and Thaddeus Droast of the Campus Security 
Force and John Thomas and his assistants 
of the custodial force quickly arrived at the 
fire and offered their assistance. Fire ex- 
tinguishers were used to put out the fire. 

Dr. Dana Still, assistant dean of academic 
affairs, assumed responsibility for the eva- 
cuation of both students and faculty; he can- 
called all first-period classes scheduled for 
Peirce. Fire Chief Wilshire investigated the 
building and stated that classes could resume 
at 9. 

The building is now being inspected for 
any structural damage. Immediate damage 
caused by the fire to Room 217, the Graduate 
Study Space and Research Center, and per- 
sonal losses, such as books, was estimated 
to be under $1,000. 

Dr. David Hilton, assistant to the president, 
extends credit and gratitude to the Clarion 
Volunteer Fire Department for their fast re- 
sponse to the fire alarm and for thorough 
action in extinguishing the fire and in pre- 
venting further damage. 



By ROSEMARY SLEBODNIK 

This semester, women residents have re- 
ceived an extension of hours. One of the 
reasons they received this extension was that 
they supposedly needed more time to study 
in the library. Women's hours have been 
extended to midnight, but the library stStdlB^ 
ses at 10. Our opinion poll concerns the ex- 
tension of library and Union hours. "Do you 
think that the closing hours for the library 
and Student Union are adequate? " 

Charles McLaughlin: "The library hours 
are too short. It should stay open until at 
least 11, since the girls don't have to be 
in until midnight. It seems just v;hen you're 
beginning to get your work done, they shut 
the lights off. The Union .should ' stay open 
until at least 11:30, so that when you're done 
studying, you can go to the Union to relax, 
listen to music, and have a cup of coffee, 
and still get your girl to the dorm on time." 

Kathy Byrne: "As a library worker, I 
don't think it would be necessary to extend 
the library hours, because on the evenings 
I have worked in the library, there were 
no more than 25 people in the library at 
closing time." 

Tom Johnson: "No, not really, because 
with the extension of hours, there is really 
no place to go except downtown, and there 
isn't much to do in town. If the Union were 



open, at least there would be a place to 
go to meet friends." 

Yuddie Elwood: "No, I like the hours 
the way they are. If you're going to the 
^library to study, chances are you would go 
early rather than late (10 o'clock is late). 
. .The Union hours are all right as tar &&. I'.m 
cohcerned; I just come between classes to 
waste time." 

Al Serff: "Definitely not. For example, 
'when the women's hours were 11:30 and 1 
o'clock, the Union closed at 11, and midnight 
on weekends. This was a good setup, because 
it left enough time for the guy tc walk his 
;girl back to the dorm— but it didn't leave 
so much time that there was no place to 
go. The way it is set up now, it is perhaps 
all right, but it does leave more time than 
would be desired." 

Laura O'Donavan: "The difficulty in get- 
ting people to work late hours outweighs 
the advantage of having the library open 
for a few people." 

If the library extended its hours, perhaps 
more students would take advantage of this 
facility. As it is now, many students may 
be discouraged from using the library, be- 
cause they may be asked to leave when 
they are most involved in their work. If 
the librarians feel a change in hoiu"s w^ould 
be worthwhile, perhaps something could be 
done to extend the closing time of both the 
library and the Student Union. 



Two Dances 



Student - Faculty Discussion Are Scheduled 



Planetarium Will Hold 
Open House Nexf Week 



Becht Hall presented the first in a series 
of faculty-student discussions last Sunday. 

It opened with a movie on the new moral- 
ity, entitled "How Do I Love Thee." Taking 
part in the discussion which followed were 
members of the faculty and prominent citi- 
zens of Clarion. Those who participated were 
Reverend and Mrs. McCartney, Dr. Hugh 
Park, and Miss Judy Brown. The discussion 
was begun by Mrs. Vairo, assistant dean 
of students. 

Among the questions discussed were: Is 
there really a new morality, or is it the 
same old one, better publicized? The group 
also discussed whether sex and love can be 
equated, whether there should be sex before 
marriage, and whether the modern genera- 
tion is more prone to lax morals than the 
generations of the past. 

Although no cohclusions were reached, it 
was the consensus of opinion that the dis- 
cussion was interesting and profitable. Both 
students and faculty had an opportunity to 
express themselves concerning this current 
issue. Both men and women students parti- 
cipated in the discussion. Refreshments were 
served, and the students had an opportunity 
to chat with the guests. 

The program committee, consisting of 



Jeanie O'Hop. Cay Weldon, Carol Winkelman, 
and Elizabeth Curley, is now making plans 
for Becht's next discussion. 



Big Weekend 
Planned For 
Clarion Students " 

The students of Clarion can plan on a "big" 
weekend in December. 

On Friday, December 6, the Supreme 
Court, an 11-piece group will be featured 
at a dance to be held in Chandler Dining 
Hall from 9-12:30. 

Saturday, December 7, the Mitch Ryder 
Revue and the New Hudson Exit will be 
featured in concert at the Clarion High School 
Auditorium. Shows will be at 7 and 9. 

Students may attend both activities for $2 
and an ID card. For those without ID cards 
it will cost $3. However, a person may pur- 
chase up to a limit of four tickets. 

Tickets will go on sale Wednesday in 
Chandler and the Student Union. One week 
before the performances, tickets will also 
be sold to area high school students. College 
students should get their tickets early, since 
the capacity of the auditorium for each show 
is 2,000. 



The pledges of Tau Kappa Epsilon are 
sponsoring a record hop tonight at Forest 
Manor. Admission will be 25 cents. The dance 
will be held from 9 to 12 o'clock. 

Saturday night there will be a dance fea- 
turing "The G-Cleffs." They are an eight- 
piece soul group. The dance will be held in 
the Tippin Gymnasium at 8:30 p.m. 

Senate Fails to Meet 

Clarion Student Senate failed to transact 
any business in their regular meeting of Nov. 
13 due to the lack of a quorum. Only six 
senators appeared. 



Coming Events 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 18 

—Dance: "The G-Cleffs," Gym. 8:30 p.m. 

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17 

—Movie: "A Man Could Be Killed," 
Chapel, 8 p.m. 

WEDNESDAY-SATURDAY, 
NOVEMBER 20-23 

—Play: "Herr Biedermann and the Fire- 
bugs," Chapel, 8:30 p.m. 



The College Planetarium in Peirce Science 
Center will observe an open house next week 
which will run from Wednesday through ^t' 
urday. 

The Planetarium will be open for touring 
and inspection of the projection instrument 
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. During this period, 
demonstrations of the planetarium will be 



Gemmell Appointed 
Committee Chairman 

Dr. James Gemmell was appointed chair- 
man of the budget and fees committee for 
the 13 state colleges at a recent meeting 
of the Board of State College Presidents at 
Lock Haven State College. 

Formal announcement of the appointment 
was made by Dr. David H. Kurtzman, Super- 
intendent of Public Instruction. Harrisburg. 
The committee is charged with responsibility 
for all fiscal matters pertaining to annual 
maintenance and long-range development of 
the state colleges. 

One of Dr. Gemmell's principal duties as 
chairman is to appear before the joint ap- 
propriations committee of the General Assem- 
bly to defend and justify the budget requests 
of the 13 state institutions. 

Dr. Genunell has also recently served as 
a member of the personnel and research 
committee for the colleges. 



given on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday 
at 10 a.m., 2 p.m., 3 p.m. 

An added attraction at the Planetarium 
Open House, will be a display of over 50 
paintings and 20 scuptures done by promin- 
ent Western Pennsylvania artists. In the hall 
surrounding the Planetarium in Peirce HaU, 
works by such noted artists as Virgil Cantini, 
painter-sculptor at the University of Pitts- 
burgh, and sculptor Henry von Bursztynowicz 
will be on rental from the Pittsburgh Plan 
for Art. 

The PPA is a non-profit agency for the 
display, rental and sale of drawings, paint- 
ings, and sculptures; it also serves as a fo- 
cal point for merging interests of those who 
are concerned with the appreciation and 
education of art. 

The exhibition will be open to the public 
from 8 to 6 Wednesday, Thursday, and Fri- 
day, and from 8 a.m. to noon on Saturday. 



All items and letters for the 
CLARION CALL must be sub- 
mitted no later than 5:00 Tues- 
day, the week of pid>lication. 
All articles must be TYPED. 



The national convention of the American 
Speech and Hearing Association being held 
in Denver, Colorado, is well attended by re- 
sentatives from Clarion. The entire staff of 
the Speech Pathology and Audiology Depart- 
ment, including Mr. Harold Hartley, coor- 
dinator, and Mr. Jack Simpson, Mr. Jack 
Smith, Mr. Denny Hetrick, Mr. Bill Brady, 
and Mr. Robert Keenen, are attending in 
addition to three senior students, Sharon 
Bridge. Stephanie Talaber, and Linda Umber. 
The convention is being held Thursday 
tHrough Monday, November 14-18. 

Stephanie Talaber will read the paper on 
"Rating of SeK-Awareness of Speech" of 
which she is co-author with Mr. Hartley. 
The paper concerns an instrument designed 
by Stephanie and Mr. Hartley which mea- 
sures the. improvement in the speech of a 
stutterer by enabhng him to hear his own 
voice. The test has been administered to 
ZiO individuals from age 10 to adulthood, 
including 70 with a stuttering problem and 
200 with a normal voice and no speech pro- 
blem. The results of the testing are also 
included in the paper. 

A series of short courses is planned for 
the first day of the convention. All of the 
delegates have a choice of the courses and 
discussions they wish to attend, but some 
of the ones offered are Linguistical Approach 
to Non-standard Speech, Psycholinguistic 
Considerations of Adult Aphasia, Electroi*y- 
(Scological Methods in Auditory Research, and 
The Use and Misuse of Statistical Influence 
in Speech and Hearing Research. 

On Friday, discussions are planned on the 
scientific and technical aspects of speech and 
hearing such as stuttering and recovering 
from it, early development of the language, 
speech services offered by the public school 
systems, speech discrimination and interna- 
tional developments in the speech and hear- 
ing fields. 

The Speech Pathology and Audiology De- 
partment is preparing an exhibit illustrating 
the undergraduate and graduate programs 
offered in that field at Clarion. The exhibit 
will be on display during the convention. 

New Courses 



Are Approved 



The Faculty Senate, at the November 11 
meeting, approved proposals for a new geo- 
graphy course, five new history courses, and 
a new psychology course. The geography 
course, 456 Aerial Photo Interpretation, is 
a systematic study of aerial photographs for 
geographic investigations of physical and cul- 
tural features of the landscape. The present 
Hist. 258 and 259 have been deleted and in 
their place are 258 Traditional India and 
259 Modem India-Pakistan. The first is the 
historical development of Indian civilization 
and 259 is a continuation of the first. Hist. 
362, History of Afro-America, deals with 
the role of the Negro in American histwy. 
Asia since World War I is the course Contem- 
porary Asia, Hist. 400. Modem Southeast As- 
ia, Hist. 270, deals with the different systems 
of western colonial rule. The psychology 
course, Psy. 322 Developmental Psychology, 
is being offered to meet the requirem«its 
of a developmental course for the music, 
nursing, and art education curriculums, and 
as a single course in developmental psychol- 
ogy for Liberal Arts students instead of both 
courses Adolescence and Child Psychology. 
Geog. 456, Hist. 258. 400, and Psy. 322 are 
being offered this coming semester and the 
others will be offered next fall. 



Page 2 



THE CALL -- Clarion State College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



Friday, November 15, 1968 



Editorially 
Speaking 



Comment Cards — A More 
Mature System Requested 



Comment cards for the first se- 
mester have recently been distributed 
to students who are doing unsatisfac- 
tory work in their courses. The pur- 
pose of these cards is to inform stu- 
dents of their academic progress after 
the first nine weelcs of classes each se- 
mester. 

However, it is questionable wheth- 
er or not these cards are of much value 
to students. Most students, and espec- 
ially upperclassmen, know exactly how 
they are doing in their classes. Re- 
ceiving a comment card only verifies 
what students already know. For this 
reason, it seems as if a considerable 
amount of time and expense is wasted 
on a practice which serves little, if any, 
purpose. 

Perhaps freshmen do need a warn- 
ing system, but upperclassmen should 
be mature enough to accept the re- 
sponsibility of seeking help from in- 
structors and advisors on their own. If 
a student has a sincere interest in his 
a^'adomic achievements, he will con- 
sider it a personal obligation to do 
something about his inadequacies. If, 
on the other hand, a student has no 
interest, a mere comment card will 
make no difference, and will not mira- 
culously change the poor sudent's study 
habits. 

Incidentally, comment cards are 



Can the Cafeteria Staff Ruin 
All the Food They Touch? 



Can the cafeteria staff really ruin 
all the food they touch? It seems this 
way. There must be other meats than 
veal and pork available. 

Many students complain unjust- 
ly about the quality of meals served, 
but realistically much of this criticism 
is justified. This year the cafeteria 
added a pop machine to reduce the 
large cost of milk. Many new and 
different desserts were added to the 
lunches, but cake, ice cream, or pie 
persist in being the dinner dessert. 
Can't there be more of a variety at din- 
ner as well as at lunch? 

Variety — that is what the students 
pf Clarion want at their meals! Is it 
necessary for the cafeteria to serve 
veal three times a week? It is getting 
to be a chore to even go to dinner. 
Why bother going, when you can ac- 
curately guess what will be served. 
For example, on Friday evenings the 
typical dinner consists of .some type 
of fish and liver, a vegetable (more; 
than likely corn or beans), a salad or 
cole slaw, cherry pie or ice cream, and 
of course, the rolls that'feel as if they 
a»-e a week old. Is this necessary? 
Certainly a dietician has more imagin- 
ation than that. 

Many of the students cannot eat 
what is served because of medical rea- 
sons or because of diets prescribed by 
physicians. The cafeteria does pro- 
vide special meals for these people, 
and those who have eaten these meals 
agree that they are worse than regular 
meals. They have less of a selection 
than \vc do: no one can eat roast beef 



seven days a week. At least, for a 
variety we sometimes get ham. 

Another complaint many students 
have is the large amount of carbohy- 
drates we are served. Why? Instant 
potatoes in any form soon lose their 
appeal. Carbohydrates do fill one up, 
but do we have to gain weight just be- 
cause we are hungry and will eat them? 
Wouldn't it be possible for two cuts of 
meat to be served with the dinner 
meal? Seconds are not allowed, but 
how can anyone survive on the small 
portions that are served? There are 
twof possible solutions: One, eat a large 
amount of rolls; or two, go to the diner 
latel' on in the evening. 

Another major complaint is this: 
Why should the cafeteria run out of 
certain foods as much as an hour be- 
fore the line closes? Often the cafe- 
terili runs out of butter and students 
must eat margarine. This is not a 
major complaint, but many students 
prefer the more expensive spread. 
There should be no excuse for running 
outjOf any food choice. 

4 

The students face a decision that 
must be made along about 4:30 every 
day: to eat and suffer the consequences 
later or to skip the meal and eat at 
the diner. If the cafeteria raised its 
standards, this decision would help the 
students save money. 

Will the cafeteria continue to 
serve veal and ham every other day? 
Mavbe not. Possiblv, tomorrow we 
will have "something new and differ- 
ent," something like swiss steak. 

— S.M.D. 



PUntiinj Tlti M«^tt<t 



» • • • 



often not a fair evaluation of how a 
student is doing in a course because 
they are usually based on a single 
exam. Every instructor tests differ- 
ently, and often students must adjust 
to a particular testing method before 
doing well on an exam. 

Freshmen, recently out of high 
school, are used to receiving regular 
reports of their academic progress, and 
when they enter college, it could pos- 
sibly be that comments make adjust- 
ments easier. But, wouldn't it be more 
practical to have a system of reporting 
exclusively for freshmen instead of 
extending this secondary school prac- 
tice to 22-year-old seniors? 

If a student wants help, he will 
find a means to get help. Surely the 
administration should have enough 
faith in their students to realize this 
fact. An evaluation of the comment 
system should, therefore, be consider- 
ed. Clarion needs to change this out- 
dated system, and as the old saying 
goes, "There is no time hke the pres- 
ent." 

We can assure the academic deans 
of the college that Clarion students will 
appreciate your efforts to revise the 
present comment card system, 

— C. W. 




Letters to The Editor 



student Supports Visitation Rights 

Editor, Hie Call: 

In regards to the opinion poll in last week's 
issue of the Call I firmly believe that such 
visitation rights are necessary in our day 
and age of "New Ideas." The visiting hours 
would have to be regulated to affcroximately 
two hours per night (Example f-9) and the 
doors should be closed to allow privacy. 

We are supposed to be young adults who 
are able to accept responsibility and, if given 
the challenge and the trust, to rise to the 
situation that would be available. If the 
•'door closing" is abused, the offenders should 
be punished severely, but the punishment 
should be reserved for the offender not the 
entire dorm. We pay for the room, why 
shouldn't we be permitted to be alone in 
it with anyone we desire? 

A few examples of the good in visitation, 
to dorms are as follows: 

1. Everyone would keep their rooms clean 
and beds made. 

2. The "Mou'ths" would watch their lan- 
guage and thus raise the morals of the dorm. 

3. Students would not run around without 
clothes (1 think). 

4. Having a desirable study mate would 
make work a lot easier. 

5. Tiiere would be a reduction in the rate 
of colds on campus. This would be due to 
the fact that everyone would be inside in- 
stead of out running in the cold with no 
place to go except the Union (nice place). 

6. Money would be saved on phone calls, 
thus the guys would have more money for 
"Bovine" (beer and wine). 

It might even be possible for the guys 
to get the girls to do their laundry and even 
get their ironing done. This will beautify 
the campus because the guys would look 
clean and dapper all the time. The girls 
would get good practice that they will need 
later for marriage. Well, it's time for class, 
so I'll see you down at my dorm real soon, 
I hope (but remember to bring spray starch 
and a lot of hangers). 

CHUCKIE 'SMOOTH " McLAUGHLIN 

Duties of Advisors Questioned 

Editor, The Call: 

What is an advisor? In many instances, 
a person who once a year hands out com- 



ments and twice annually pre-registers a stu- 
dent. In spme cases even these minimal func- 
tions are not fulfilled. From past experience 
I know that a freshman or first semester 
sophomore is not equipped to single-handedly 
choose his own subjects. How many students 
short six credits for graduation or minus 
a needed prerequisite for a course he wishes 
to take now wish that their advisor had ad- 
vised? 

A real Irelationship should exist between 
student and advisor. More contact should oc- 
cur than bi-annual visits. 

Music professors have psychology major 
advisees. Elementary majors are scattered 
at randem over the faculty. 

Revise. Strengthen. Abolish? 

PSEUD 0. NYM 



Future Flicks 



A\ ENDLNG 

It is night now and on the street 
Men struggle to escape the shadow 
And find an ending. 

rautionless faltering and the cold bells 
That .sini^ over the old town: 
The night did not reach them. 

Across the naked pavement the 
Gray chapel waits in a slow 



Solitude for the dream of morning. 

We talk in our own tongue; 
Together the thin silence and I 
Wander over the wet stars. 

It is night and there is no music, 

All is empty. 

Even the fountains of my heart. 

C. R. G. 



Kappa Delta Pi 
Recent Addition 
To Campus Groups 

Kappa Delta Pi, honorary education fra- 
ternity, is a relatively recent addition to the 
organizations on Clarion campus, being ini- 
tiated only a little over a year ago. The 
officers for this semester, Nancy Mincemo- 
yer, president; Cindy Hovis, vice president: 
Buth Johnston, secretary-treasurer; and Barb 
Jakub, hi.storian. along with the members 
would like to express their appreciation to 
Dr. Francis Baptist, our advisor, for his en- 
thusia.stic interest and cooperation. 

Thus far this semester, the Lambda Eta 
chapter has held an organizational meeting 
and dessert held at Dr. Baptist'^ home. We 
also are planning a meeting to 'be held on 
Nov. 20. Speaking at this meeting will be 
Father Eldon Somers and Rev. David Lutz, 
who will speak and lead discussion on the 
controversial topic "Obscenity and You," con- 
cerning censorship in literature.' We would 
like fo invite all interested students to at- 
tend this meeting. We have, in addition, made 
many exciting plans for our future meetings 
and service projects to the campus. 



Continuing until tomorrow ni^ht at the Gar- 
by will be 'If He Hollers. Let Him Go," 
a story of intrigue and murder in which 
songstress Barbara McNair makes her film 
debut. 

Beginning Sunday is the double feature: 
"Angels from Hell" and "Sadismo," the 
first, a story about a motorcycle gang, the 
second another anthology of modern sadistic 
practices. Wednesday begins the German im- 
port, "Helga," a graphically intimate story 
of a girl on the brink of womanhood. 

Ending Saturday at the Orpheum is "I'll 
Never Forget What's 'Is Name," the story 
of a young junior auvertising executive who 
one day decides to cut his career short with 
an axe. Rod Taylor and Claudia Cardinale 
arrive Sunday in "The Hell with Heroes," 
a movie set in the Algerian black-market. 

The Wednesday Bargain Night feature will 
be the World War II comedy "The Secret 
War of Harry Frigg," starring Paul Newman. 
The next night, Sean Conncry, Brigitte Bar- 
dot, and Honor Blackman team together in 
the western "Shalako" which deals with an 
1880's safari into the American V/est. 

Spotlight On 
Other Campuses 

Robert Morris Junior College 

Robert Morris Junior College in Pittsburgh 
is trying a new system called "block book- 
ing. " The main purpose of this device is 
to enable colleges to stretch their budgets 
to obtain the best quality entertainment for 
the best possible price. With this system sev- 
eral neighboring colleges hire a group and 
share the expenses that would otherwise be 
incurred for transportation and the like. 
Temple University 

The students of Temple University have 
formed a Student Tutorial Society. Students 
in need may hire a student-tutor for a small 
fee. 
East Stroudsburg State College 

The administration of East Stroudsburg 
S*a1e Co'lee*™ has »>resentr>d a statement on 
dress regulations. The students, however, are 
contesting the ruling, claiming that a dress 
code is not relevant to an education. 

Four People Gather 
At Open Meeting 

Only four people gathered at the of)en meet- 
ing of the Faculty Senate Ad Hoc Parking 
Committee held Nov. 13. Present were Dr. 
Tracy Bpchwalter. member of the committee, 
Mr. Thaddeus Droast, director of security. 
Brian Dubosky, student, and Dick Mears, 
■student. 



Alliance for Campus Talent 
Helps to Book Entertainment 



Editor's Note: This is the second in a 
series «f articles dealiag with the programs 
sponsM-ed by the National Students Asso- 
ciation. For further information on this pro- 
gram, see a student senator. 

By DICK MEARS 

The Alliance for Campus Talent is another 
program of N.S.A., A.C.T. is a service which 
is conoerned with alleviating some of the 
problems faced by campus entertainment 
chairmen. A.C.T. assists in booking the best 
live entertainment at the lowest possible 
rates. A.C.T. also assists in arranging for 
concert film programs and in booking speak 
ers. 

Based on the money available, opeii dates 
in the college calendar and talent prefer- 
ences, A.C.T. will negotiate with agents and 
managers for the attractions you want. A.C.T. 
will work as your agent. 

A.C.T, maintains up-to-date files on the 
appearances of performers on college cam- 
puses. This file includes attendance figures, 
the fees paid to attractions, campus ratings 
of the Cfuality of performances, and to date 
itineraries for future campus appearances. 
A.C.T. helps schools organize regional "block 
booking" and will sponsor "block booking" 
conferences. By enabling several schools in 
an area to book an attraction on several 
consecutive nights, transportation expenses 
are lowered for the performer and conse- 
quently the cost pf the talent to the schools 
can be lowered considerably. 

Publications are also cent to subscribers 
to help make their concerts successful. How 
to Publicize Your Campus Entertainment 
Program and How to Choose Entertainment 
for Your Campus are two of the publications 
available. Also, a periodic newsletter written 
especially for campus talent bookers. Attrac- 
tion includes information about which perfor- 



mers have appeared and where and how 
successful the concert was. 

All campus organizations sponsoring live 
entertainment events, speakers, and films are 
entitled to use the Alliance for Campus Tal- 
ent services. 

The following demonstrates how A.C.T. 
works to get campus talent: 

1. Phone or write ACT. specifying the 
dates to be booked, the funds budgeted for 
the attractions you want. Be sure to give 
several alteniative attractions and dates. 

2. Give ACT. an idea of the type of attrac- 
tions you want, i.e., soul or jazr. 

3. Having received your authorizatMn to re- 
present you in negotiation for the attractions 
and dates which you have specified, AJC.T. 
will proceed with the following steps: 

4. They will review our files to determine 
how well the attraction performed on other 
campuses, how well the performance was 
attended and how much money other schools 
were charged for the act. They will also 
review future itineraries of performers to 
see which acts will be appearing in your 
area. 

5. They will then ascertain the availability 
and range of fees of the attractiMis which 
you have requested. Because A.C.T. repre- 
sents many schools, they are in a more know- 
ledgeable and powerful bargaining position 
than any single school. A.C.T. will then nego- 
tiate on your behalf for the lowest possible 
price for the talent you desir^. 

6. If you agree to the negotiated price 
for the performer, operations will be put 
in motion to finalize the agreement between 
the authorized representative ot your school 
and the attraction's representative. 

A.C.T. is not a talent agency. They repre- 
sent no performers of their own. A.C.T. does 
offer an excellent opportunity to acquire tal- 
ent for Clarion's campus. 



A Peek At Greeks 



DELTA LAMBDA TAU 

Tomorrow Delta Lambda Tau is holding 
a Slave Day to raise money to become a 
national sorority. In the future, we anticipate 
selling personalized address stickers. This 
week starts -our work with cerebral pasly 
therapy.'! " 

To become better acquainted with the fra- 
ternities we have to have their help in several 
service projects. For example, next Thursday 
jur pledges and the Gamma pledges will 
either be washing cars or shoveling side- 
winiks. 

SIG.MA SIGMA SIGMA 

Tile Tri ^igmas are still selling shaker 
sweaters. Give your orders to any member 
with a $3 deposit. The sweaters cost $11 
and come in navy, maroon, black, and green. 

ZETA TAU ALPHA 

The Zetas are happy to announce the for- 
mation of a new chapter, Zeta Upsilon, at 
Edinboro State College. 

Zeta love and white violets go out to Peggy 
McCauley on her recent pinning to Jack Mor- 
avetz, TKE. 

Congratulations to Pledge Betty Ferguson 
for her contribution to the debate tournament 
in Atlanta, Ga. 

PHI SIGMA KAPPA 

Through the fine leadership of the frater- 
nity's intramural football captain. Bob Fur- 
Ian, Phi Sigma Kappa has placed fourth in 
this year's competition. A good showing is 
also expected of the fraternity's volleyball, 
swimming and basketball teams. 

President Bill Kreuer has announced that 
negotiations are ncaring an end on the de- 
cision which will make 703 Wood Street the 
permanent site of Nu Pentaton Chapter. 

ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA 

Today was Alpha Sigma Alpha's Found- 
ers Day. The sisters wore their suits and 
plan on a celebration for Monday night, Nov. 
18. 



Last week the pledges elected their offi- 
cers; Denny Folmar, president; Carol Ste- 
wart, vice president; and Karyn Zunick, se- 
cretary. Many of the pledges lost their turtle 
friends. Since the weather is how too cold 
for turtles, we hold the pledges can manage 
thefr ASA signs. 

The finance committee under Sandy Merlin 
plans to send out its first perfume order 
the first week after Thanksgiving. Anyone 
who wants perfume for Christmas gifts should 
order before this time. There are 15 brands 
to choose froift. 

ALPHA SIGMA TAU 

The AST fraternity for this coming week 
will be the brothers- of Alpha Gamma Phi. 

We'd like to thank the student body for 
their tremendous support of the Wednesday 
night dances at Forest Manor. We alternate 
with the Social Committee oi forest Manor 
in sponsoring these dances every week. 



PINS, RINGS 
AND BELLS 



RINGS 

Douglas Callen, TKE, to Ginny Carlson, 
AST. 

Marg Rumisek, CSC, to Tom Kudos, Phi 
Sigma Kappa. 

Jay Holleran. LaSalle College, to Mary 
Kay Kraus, CSC. 

MUlie Gasper, Delta Lambda Tau, to 
George D. Mann, USMC, Cherry Point, North 
Carolina. 

Harold Heltman, Mars, Pa., to Jamie Eb- 
ner, CSC. 



Only four boroughs will be found in Monroe 
County. 



The elation Call 



CALL Office, Room J, Harvey Hall 
Clarion State College, Clarion, Penna. 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Carolyn Welesko 

BUSINESS MANAGER Tom Smith 

NEWS EDITOR Sandy Diesel 

FEATURE EDITOR Sue Fair 

COPY EDITOR Rosemary Slebodnik 

EXCHANGE EDITOR Peg Foley 

CO-SPORTS EDITORS Dennis Morrow, Gary Andres 

STAFF MEMBERS Elizabeth Curley, Margaret Beierle, 

Ann Rohrbaugh, Ed Wozniak, Gary Daurora, Larry Carter, 
Georgana Winters, Linda Sonnenfeld, Owen Winters, Dianna 
Cherry, Larilyn Andre, Dick Mears, Bob Toth, Jerry Zary, 
Nancy Sarginger, Judy Summy, Linda Pifer, Kathy Jones 
ADVISOR .-. Richard K. Redfern 




' 



Friday, November 15, 1968 



THE CALL — Clarion State College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



Page 3 



qn= 



WAA INTRAMURAL ACTIVITIES 1968-69 



Activity 


Roster 
Du« Date 


Starting Date 


Roster 
Requirements 
Min. Max. 


Meeting Place 


Chess 


October 25th 


November 4th 


1 


1 


Student Union 


Pinochle 


October 25th 


November 4th 


2 


2 


Student Union 


Bowling 


October 30th 


November 5th 


1 


1 


Ragley's 


*Swimming — Recreational; Women only) 


Novembor 4th 


Open to 


all women 


Pool 


Basketball 


January 6th 


January 9th 


6 


10 


Main Gym 


Table Tennis 


January 16th 


February 1st 


1 


1 


Main Gym 


"500" 


January 15th 


February 3rd 


2 


2 


Student Union 


Foul Shooting 


February 17th 


March 3rd 


3 


3 


Main Gym 


Paddle Ball 


March 3rd 


March 17th 


1 


1 


Handball Court 


Archery 


April 3rd 


April lOth 


1 


1 


Stadium 


SoftbaU 


April 10th 


April 17th 


9 


15 


Stadium 



*— Recreational Swimming will be held the 1st Monday of each month, 6:00-8:00 p.m. 

All College women are eligible to participate in this program. Any group (dormi- 
tory, sorority, or independents) may enter a team or teams by completing the official 
roster forms and returning the form to Room 109, Tippin Gym or to any WAA Dorm 
representative on or before the due date listed above. All equipment is provided by 
the W.A.A. Copies of the WAA Intramural Constitution may be secured from Room 
109, Tippin Gym. 



WAA Chooses Officers for '68-69 



The following girls have been selected as 
the officers for the Women's Athletic Associ- 
ation for the year; 

President, Nicki Wilson; vice-president. 



Janet Marasco; secretary-treasurer, Sandy 
Artac. 

Many new activities have been added to 
the list of Intramural sports for women. 



FUN WORKING IN EUROPE 




GUARANTEED JOBS ABROAD! Get paid, travel, meet people. 
Summer and year round jobs for young people 17 to 40. For illus- 
trated literature with complete detai'.s on programs offered and 
how to apply, write; ISTC, Admissions, 866 U.N. Plaza, N. Y., 
N. Y. 10017. 



Coach Joy Predicts Good Season 
For Clarion Staters Golden Eagles 



Cautious optimism pervades Clarion State's 
basketball talk as Coach John Joy assesses 
his 1968-69 season chances. 

According to Mr. Joy, the Golden Eagles 
looked fairly good in a preseason scrimmage 
last Sunday with St. Vincent College in 
Latrobe. Tonight the Eagles will scrimmage 
Carnegie-Mellon here, and on November 21, 
CSC hosts Westminster College in another 
preseason game. 

Eagles Show Improvement 

It seems reasonable that the Eagles will 
show improvement over last year's 515 re- 
cord. They show more height and all-around 
depth in their ranks and will need it in 
coping with a longer and tougher schedule 
including tournaments at Troy-Alabama and 
the Indiana Christmas To\u-nament, both in 
December. 

After two poor seasons in a row. Coach 
Joy is due for better things. His eight-year 
record at Clarion shows 69 wins and 65 losses, 
and he feels he has the material to continue 
his better than 50 percent average. Help from 
able assistant coaches, Tom Beck and Stan 
Hallman, bolsters that conviction. 

Lettermen Returning 

Seven returning lettermen should contri- 
bute to a strong starting lineup. 

Returnees are captain and playmaker Joe 
Chalmers, 5' 9" senior; juniors George Law- 
ry, 6' 4" center and leading rebounder; Bud- 
dy Martin, 6' 1" swing man who came on 
strong last year; Denny Luce, 5' 11" outside 
scoring powerhouse, and Joe Podolak, 5' 10", 
who is probably the best alternate guard 
in the conference. 

Back in harness after sitting out last seafson 
for a technical violation are 6' 2" senior 
Larry Kubovchick and 6' 3" senior Bob Fus- 
co. Larry was leading scorer a^d second 
leading rebounder for the Golden Eagles his 
sophomore year, as well as third leading 
scorer in the state; Bob was leading re- 
bounder and second leading scorer his sopho- 
more year. 

Comeback Anticipated 

Two big "ifs" malting the Eagles' hopes 
for a comeback a clouded issue bang on 
the ability of these two key men to spring 
back after a year's layoff. 

More cause for wonderment is 6' 10". John 
Park, just up from the freshman ranks. The 
Eagle coaches have high hqpes of the tow- 
ering sophomore developing . defensively and 
becoming a strong rebounder. 

Packing another question mark is 6' 4" 
sophomore Ernie Westerman, who has fine 
back-up potential at forward and center. 

Other varsity men who should see consider- 
able action this year are 5' 11" senior j,gylird 
Regis Ruane; 6' 2" junior forward Frank 
Bracks, who is not eligible until, the secobd 
semester, sophomores Ray Rykaceski, 5' 9" 
guard, and Dennis Dixon, 6' 2" forward. 

F4*eshmen Join Team 

Twelv? likely looking freshmen joining the 
Eagle Banks this season are Thomas Mur- 
taugh, 6' 4"; Fred Haas, 6' 5"; Mike Rastat- 
ter, 6'; .Greg ThompsMi, 6' 1 "; George 
Vitcain, 6 2"; Jim Schultz, 5' 9"; Albert 
Ritchie, 6' 1"; Cart Jeffries, 6' 1"; Bill Mit- 
chell, 6' .5"; Tom Fyre, 6' 2"; Don Niver, 
6' 1"; and Tom Mudyer, 6'. 



Coach Joy feels that Edinboro is the team 
to beat this year; the Fighting Scots posted 
a 19-5 slate last year and are always a big 
threat. Other conference troublemakers could 
be Lock Haven, California, and SUppery 
Rock. 

Season Begins Dec. 4 

Clarion opens the hardwood season Decem- 
ber 4 when they host Walsh College of Canton, 
Ohio, in the first game on the new Waldo 
S. Tippin Gymnasium floor. 

A Blue and Gold intersquad game is sche- 
duled for November 25, at 7:30 p.m. in Tip- 
pin Gymnasium. 



CLARION 
DRY CLEANING CO. 



OFFERS YOU: 



• 1 Hour Dry Cleaning 

Shirt Laundry • Tailoring 

• Formal Wear Rentals 



541 LIBERTY STREET 

PHoilE 226-6121 
OPEN MON. . FRI. 'TIL 9 P.M. 
CLOSE SAT. AT 6 P.M. , 



CLARION 



Do we have to import scribblers and graf- 
fiti-lovers to fill the empty pastel walls sur- 
rounding the construction site? 

Are dieticians-in-residence really working 
toward an all-starch diet for CSC students? 

No comments on the comment system? 
Come on, students — tell it like it is. 



MODERN DINER 

Where Friends Meet to Eat 

Enjoy Life . . , pat Out Here Often 
We Are Always Open 

We Cater to the Family Children Are Always Welcome 




\ 



m 



^r 




Playtex* invents the first-day tampon^ 

(We took the inside out 

to show you how different it is.) 

Outside: it's softer and silky (not cardboardy). 
Inside: it's so extra absorbent. . .it even protects on 
your first day. Your worst day! 

In every lab test against the old cardboardy kind . . . 
the Playtex tampon was always more absorbent. 
Actually 45 % more absorbent on the average 
than the leading regular tampon. 

Because it's different. Actually adjusts to you. 
It flowers out. Fluffs out. Designed to protect every 
inside inch of you. So the chance of a mifhap 
is almost zero! 



Try it fast. 

Why live in the past? 



*'itvimi>jr.A,...,HM : 



Q pl%tex 

ratn^ons 



■■■*vye^K.>^.fJ- 



y^tf^t^ '-...lil^y.-^fc^n' 



USE YOUR STUDENT DISCOUNT CARD 
AND SAVE AT 

Town & Country 1-Hour 

Dry Cleaner and 4-Hour 

Shirt Laundry 

BEST SERVICE — LOWEST PRICES 

MAIN STREET CLARION 



I 



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CHIKOSKY'S 
PHARMACY 

BONNE BELL 
COTY 

CosntHics 

RUSSELL STOVER 
Candieg 



Clarion 



226-8450 



J , . I 



WEI]\S 

Clarion's 

Home 

of 

PLAYBOY 

MAN ON 

CAMPUS 

FASHIONS 



HIGGINS and 
*DACRON® 
make the 
College scene 

SEBRING slacks by 
HIGGINS are blended 
with DACRON* polyester 
to keep them looking 
new and creased. 
•Young-cut, with the 
ri^ht taper and up to 
the minute colors. 
HIGGINS SLACKS 




Sebrina 

BT HIGGINS 



«< 




If you'd rather join a job-in than 
pull acop-out.thcrc's a groovy state 
where the bag is work, and tuned 
in swingers turn out happenings. 

Pennsylvania's where it's at, and 
if you're ready to be zapped with 
a tumed-on scene, take a trip to 
Pennsylvania, and check out the 
chances you have to do your own 
thing. 

In plain English, there are op- 
portunities to make it as a teacher, 
as 'a chemist, as an engineer, as 
just about anything you want to 
be. And it's all in Pennsylvania. 
Just join our job-in, and find out 
about it. 





For information about living and current job 

opportunities in the New Pennsylvania, write to: 

Job-In 

aiflFord L. Jones, Secretary 

Pennsylvania Department of Commerce 

225 Pi^ Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 17101 

Commonwealth of Pcnns\lvania. 

RAYMOND R SHAFER, Uovernor 



Name 
College 



Class 



j Permanent Home Address 

I 

I City 



.State. 



.W^.. 



Page 4 



THE CALL -- Clarion State College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



-p*" 



Friday, November 15, 198« 



Giunta Chosen Player of the Week Clarion Rifle Team 

Opens Competition 
Against Allegheny 



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^^Hk '**' flJIIrll^^^^^^^H 




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K^dn^H 




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MIKE GIUNTA 

Closing out the season's play, the coaches 

have decided to name Mike Giunta for this 

week's player of the week award for his 



Eagles Slip Past 
Slippery Roek 
In Season Finale 

The Golden Eagles scored a come-from- 
behind victory Saturday over the Rockets 
of Slippery Rock in the final game of the 
season for both teams. Clarion's come-from- 
behind victory was sparked by recovery of 
a blocked punt by sophomore Chuck Koval 
for a touchdown and the throwing of Bob 
Erdeljac, who threw for 229 yards and two 
touchdowns. 

After Slippery Rock kicked off to Clarion, 
a tough Rocket defense forced Clarion to 
punt and Slippery Rock took over on their 
own 30-yard line. The Rockets drove the 70 
yards in seven plays capped by Jay Wagner's 
23-yard touchdown run. Wilkeson kicked the 
extra point. 

When Slippery Rock's tough defense 
stopped the Golden Eagles again and forced 
them to punt, the Rockets got the ball on 
their own 25-yard Une. They drove 75 yards 
in' seven plays and scored when Wagner ram- 
bled the final 52 yards to score, Wilkeson 
tK^„ added the extra ppint. The score at 
tl|e^ end of the first quarter was Clarion 0, 
Slippery Rock l*: " 

.'In the second quarter Slippery Rock con- 
trolled the ball lor 32 plays, while Clarion 
ran only seven plays. The only scoring at- 
tempt in the quarter was a 40-yard field 
goal try by Slippery Rock's Franjione. ft 
was wide and short. 

In the third quarter Clarion got on the 
sccWeboard when Bob Gevaudan blocked a 
Slippery Rock punt and Chuck Koval rambled 
38 yards for the touchdown. ScAol Dorish 
made the conversion and the score was Cla- 
rion 7 and Slippery Rock 14. 

In the fourth quarter the Golden Eagles 
punted to the Rockets' 27-yard line. On the 
first play Wagner fumbled and Jimmy Jones 
pounced on the ball at the Slippery Rock 
25-yard line. Then Clarion capitalized on t^e 
break when Bob Erdeljac threw a screen 
pass to Bill Wise for a 25-yard touchdown. 
John Dorish made the conversion, which tied 
the score at 14-all. 

Clarion kicked off to Slippery Rock and 
they drove to the Clarion 17-yard line. At 
this point, the Golden Eagles' defense tighten- 
ed and the Rockets were forced to kick a 
35-yard field goal, which was made by Fran- 
jione. The score Clarion 14, Slippery Rock 
17. 

Slippery Rock then kicked off and Mike 
Giunta returned the kick 33 yards to the Cla- 
rion 40-yard line. Clarion drove the 60 yards 
in 13 plays capped by a spectular seven-yard 
touchdown catch by Mike Giunta. John Dorish 
kicked the extra point, making the score Cla- 
rion 21 and Slippery Rock 17. 

The final scoring in the game came when 
Slippery Rock vi'as forced to punt from their 
own endzone and Art Tragasser blocked it 
for a safety. The final score was Clarion 23, 
Slippery Rock 17. 

GAME STATISTICS 



Clarion 


Slippery Rock 


12 


Total First Downs 


20 


68 


Net Yards Rushing 


351 


2» 


Passes Attempted 


14 


16 


Passes Completed 


4 


1 


Interceptions 





229 


Passing Yardage 


40 


2n 


Total Yardage 


391 





Fumbles 


1 





Fumbles Lost 


1 


95 


Yards Penahzed 
SCORING 


42 



Slippery Rock: Wagner, 23-yard run (Wilke- 
son kick). 

Slippery Rock: Wagner, 52-yard run (Wilke- 
son kick). 

Clarion: Koval, 38-yard run— blocked punt 
(Dorish kick). 

Slippery Rock: Franjione, 35yard fieldgoal. 

Clarion; Wise, 25 yard pass (Dorish kick). 

Clarion: Giunta, 7-yard pass (Dorish kick). 

Clarion: Tragesser, safety-blocked punt 



outstanding performance in Clarion's wtt"»v%, 
er Slippery Rock this past Saturday. 

Giunta is a member of that rare breed 
of halfbacks whose small size (5-8, 16$ 
pounds) accounts for his quickness and agili 
ity, but who is strong enough to fend 9^ 
enemy tackles or take care of on-ruShing' 
linemen when protecting the passer. One of 
Mike's biggest asuets is his perception of 
what's going on all over the field. 

His quickness out of the backfield and his 
keen sense for picking out holes has made 
him one of the lop rushers in the conference. 
On an end-around sweep Mike can pour it • 
on and outrace the linebacker or stop sud- 
denly and charge into the Une leaving the 
defense flatfooted. All the time Mike's mov- 
ing; feet, hips, shoulders are moving, faking 
one way and going the other, giving the 
defensiveman as little area as possible to 
tackle. 

As anyone who was at the game last Sat- 
urday saw, Giunta put forth another beautiful 
performance. He snared four passes for an 
average of 11 yards per pass and after a 
slow first half brought his yards rushing to 
3.5 per carry. His 46-yard kickoff return in 
the fourth quarter set up a Clarion touch- 
down. Giunta was the spark Clarion needed 
after a poor first half. When Clarion needed 
a big play, they would just open up a hole 
and give the ball to Mike. 

Coach Jacks, commenting on Mike's perfor- 
mance said, "Mike was what the team need- 
ed in the second half to get started. He 
gave the team the boost to win." 

Sign-Out Change 
Is Diseussed by 
Students* Deans 

At the weekly meeting of the Women's 
Residence Board, Deans Vairo, Reisman, and 
Elliott participated ui a rather lengthy dis- 
cussion concerning sign-out procedures for 
Clarion's women students. The deans expres- 
sed their desire for a fair system which 
would promote complete honesty on the part 
of the girls and at the same time provide 
maximum security. 

The board reached no conclusions, but it 
was decided that a questionnaire would be 
sent to all women residents and dorrti meet- 
ings would be held to give the girls a chance 
to discuss the alternatives. The results of 
the questionnaire, if approved by the Wo- 
men's Residence Board, will then be put 
in a proposal to the deans, who will in turn 
send it to President Gemmell. He will make 
the final decision. 



Eighteen men, 11 veterans and seven new- 
comers, have zeroed in on Coach Galen Ob- 
er's 1968-69 rifle team with the opening match 
today hosting Allegheny College at 6 p.m*. 
in the new Tippin Gymnasium indoor range 
at Clarion State College. 

Ober has added an additional three match- 
es to his original card of 13. recently schedul- 
ing home contests with St. Francis and Pitt, 
Nov. 23, and Feb. 1, and an away shoot 
with St. Francis, Jan. 29. 

Regarding the competition as generally 
tougher this year, Ober cites the opener with 
the Gator riflemen as the really big one 
as the Meadville squad is considered tops 
in the league. Also rating high in keenest 
competition ranks are Pitt, Indiana, Carne- 
gie-Mellon, and Geneva. W and J, St. Fran- 



qs and Duqucsne are less formidable b|it 
still no pushovers. 

Returning to the lists this season are vel^ 
erans Craig Bates, Latrobe; Randy Burns, 
S I i g o; William Chessman, Wilkinsburg; 
James Daley, Stanhope, N. J.; Dennis Em- 
crick, Hyndman; Eimar Larson. Lanse; RoO- 
ald Stebler, Pittsburgh; David Weible, Falla 
Creek; Hagen Hileman, Cherry Tree; Curtis 
Barrett, Corsica, and Donald Uber, Harbor- 
creek. 

Newcomers behind the sights are William 
Conti, Hawk Run; Bryce Heasley, Harrison 
City; William Klugh, Karns City; Ron Mc- 
Kinnis, Chicora; Robert PraiH, J#annette; 
William Beckner, Jerome, aud Harvey Tan- 
nenbaum, Pittsburgh. 

1968-69 SEASON SCHEDULE 

Nov. 16— Allegheny (home. 6:00 p.m.) / 
Nov. 22— Indiana (home, 7:00 p.m.) 
Nov. 23— St. Francis (home, 1:00 p.m.) 
Dec. 6 — W, & J. and Carnegie-Mellon, away 
Jan. 10 — Indiana (away) 
Jan. 29 — St. Francis (away) :^ 

Jan. 31— Allegheny (away) 



Feb. 1— Pitt (home, 1:00 p.m.) 

Feb. 7^W. & J. (away) 
I Feb. 14— Duquesoe (home, 6:00 p.m.) 
I Feb. IS— Geneva (away) 
, Feb. 21— Geneva (home, 7:00 p.m.) 

Feb. 22— Caroegie-M^lon (home, 1:00 p.m.) 
\ F^b. 2»— Duquesne and Pitt (at Pitt) 



« If Ralston girls rate a concrete sidewalk, 
^hy do the residents of Jefferson and Mc- 
iKean have to put up with a mud cliff? 

Question vf ttie Week: Should the Modern 
S)iner expand its facilities, issue meal tickets 
•nd provide some much-needed competition? 



ATTENTION STUDENTS 

The editors of the CLARION CALL arc 
planning on changing the flag. The flag la 
found at the top of each issue which reads 
CLARION CALL. We would appreciate your 
ideas since this is YOUR paper. If you like 
the present flag we would like to hear your 
reasons. 

Any student who would like to design a 
new flag is urged to do so and submit it to 
the CALL office as soon as possible. 

We would like to have this change in ef- 
fect by the start of next semester. 



1 



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Clarion, Pa. 






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Ferguson Captures Third Place 
Plaque in Debate Tournament 



Betti Ferguson, a junior from Gibsonia, 
won an engraved plaque as third-place in- 
dividual speaker last weekend at the Hiram 
College debate tournament in Hiram, Ohio. 

Miss Ferguson achieved the honor in com- 
petition with students from 24 colleges and 
universities from Ohio, Michigan and Penn- 
sylvania. 

Miss Ferguson and her colleague, sopho- 
more Marilyn Roslanowick, posted a 4-2 re- 
cord in the tourney, with wins over Hiram, 
Wooster, Lansing and Kenyon, and losses 
in two tie debates with the first-place win- 
ners from Marietta and the third-place team 
from M alone. ' 

Eight Clarion novices also took part in 
the competition at Hiram and at St. Vin- 
cent College, Latrobe, and compiled a total 
record of ten wins and ten losses. 

Sue Ann Knowles, sophomore, and Judy 
Rosenstecl, freshman, compiled the best re- 
cord for Clarion novices, posting a 4-2 slate 
with wins over Marietta, Thicl, Ohio Wesley- 
an and Muskingum, and losses to Kenyon 
and John Carroll. 



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BETTl FERGUSON 



OPINION POLL 



Is the Advisor System Effective? 
Students Answer Yes' and No' 



By ROSEMARY SLEBODNIK 

During the week before preregistration and 
after comments were issued, notices ap- 
peared in the daily bulletins urging students 
to make appointments with their "friendly" 
advisors. Though this may have been writ- 
ten with humorous intentions, one couldn't 
help but feel that there must be something 
wrong with our present advisor system. This 
prompted us to ask students how often they 
meet with their advisors, and do they find 
such an advisor system effective— especially 
during preregistration. 

Linda I^xterman: "Previously, I have had 
no use for an advisor. They were superficially 
concerned, and too rushed to give valuable 
statement; therefore, I had to advise myself. 
However, I feel if an advisor could effectively 
give advice with some real though and con- 
cern, then this advice would be worthwhile." 

Richard CuUen: "All students should have 
to go to an advisor. The advisors may know 
special class changes or special conditions 
of which thft.atud^t is unaware." 

Jim Orr: "I feel that an advisor with 
proper experience — that is, knowledgeable 
about courses to be taken, and is familiar 
with your dossier — could be extremely helpful 
in course selection. I think that sometimes 
an advisor who knows what he is doing can 
help you make better course selections. So 
many advisors are just interested in their 
own fields — these are not good advisors. I 
feci juniors or seniors should have an option 
to preregister with an advisor." 

Kathy Barron: "From my present exper- 
ience, I find my advisor really helps me 
decide what course I should take and bal- 
ances my courses as to weight of courses. 
But this is my third advisor; the others were 
not as concerned." 

James Huber: "If you get rid of advisors, 
a course list could be made available to 
students in order for them to meet the re- 
quirements of their majors. As far as I can 
see, the principal function of the advisor is 
to put his initials on your preregistration 
form. In my case. I don't feel an advisor 
is necessary, but for others, the advisor may 
be helpful." 

Raine Martin: "It depends on who your 
advisor is. It's really ridiculous— people in 
the music department advising students who 
are in math. If you have an advisor who 
is in your department and knows you, then 
you are lucky. My advisor is my friend, 



and she actually advises me, because she 
knows me. But if you have to go to an 
advisor only to preregister, then this system 
isn't worthwhile. Anyhow— where's it all fit 
in the Big Puzzle?" 

Ed King: "You should go to an advisor 
to pick out your own courses. He shouldn't 
tell you to take certain courses. So far, every 
time I've gone lo my advisor, I have had 
a general idea of what I'd taken, and what 
courses were required. My advisor has not 
been able to advise me; so far he's just 
there. I've made appointments with him for 
preregistering, and nothing else." 

These opinions do not necessarily show that 
the advisors are doing poor work. In an 
interview with Dean of Academic Affairs 
James Moore, it was found that most of 
the advisors are doing a good job. Dean 
Moore said the preregistration system as 
such was necessary so that departments 
could divide classes into various sections be- 
fore registration time. Even with such a sys- 
tem, students often change schedules. Our 
advisor system was divised so that Students 
could discuss any problems they may have 
with a faculty member. This would resolvfe 
any difficulties a student would have with 
course selection l>efore classes begin. Dean 
Moore admitted that there are students cap- 
able of preregistering by themselves, since 
they keep an accurate record of their courses, 
credits, and grades, but there are many stu- 
dents who are not mature enough, or do 
not think to keep such a record. For this 
reason, all students must observe a uniform 
system of preregistration to avoid extra 
work and confusion. 

Well, who is to blame for tlie problems 
created by such a system? Not all the ad- 
visors and not all the students. Those to 
blame are the students who don't know, or 
don't care who their advisors are, advisors 
who do not meet with their students after 
making an appointment, students who have 
no idea what courses they need to take, 
and advisors who have no idea what courses 
their advisees need to take. This does show 
a definite lack of faculty-student communi- 
cations. When can the present system be 
faultless? When all faculty members realize 
that students under 30 are not that bad, 
and when students realize that most faculty 
members are human and that they should 
take time to pay a visit to their "friendly" 
advisor. 



Muzyka Case to Be Appealed; 
Students Circulate Petition 



An appeal was presented to President 
James Gemmell yesterday concerning the re- 
cent dismissal of Jerry Muzyka, a senior 
majoring in Russian and a member of Alpha 
Gamma Phi fraternity. 

As a result of this incident, a petition is 
now being circulated throughout the campus, 
which advocates a change back to the judicial 
system of 1964, in which a student-faculty 
board made decisions on disciplinary mat- 
ters. This petition was presented to the 
president today. 

According to Mr. Emmett Graybill, assis- 
tant professor of political science. Jerry was 
charged with the verbal assault of a faculty 
member, creating a disturbance, and destroy- 
ing college property. He was found guilty on 
all three charges and dismissed from school 
for the remainder of the semester by Dr. 
Allan Elliott, dean of student affairs. 

A hearing was held on Thursday, Oct. 24, 
at which time all evidence was presented 
to Deans Elliott. Ethel Vairo, and Donald 
Nair with Dr. Elliott serving as chairman. 
Everyone present was permitted to express 
their opinions, and all factors were carefully 
considered by those present. Professors Em- 
mett Graybill, Lester D. Moody and Jay Van 
Bruggen represented Jerry as counsel. 

On Friday, Oct. 11. Jerry attended a dance 
at Forest Manor. According to one version 



of the testimony at the hearing, Jerry at- 
tended the dance in an intoxicated state, 
and as a result, picked up two di.shes, which 
were property of the state, and smashed 
them against the wall. Mr. Stanley Hallman, 
head resident of Forest Manor South and 
freshman basketball coach, saw what happen- 
ed, approached Jerry from behind, grabbed 
his shoulders, and thus initiated a shoving 
match. No blows were struck by either party, 
but abusive language was used in the con- 
versation. 

At the time. Jerry claimed that he did 
not recognize who Mr. Hallman was since 
he was approached from behind. 

Much of the evidence at the hearing was 
difficult to analyze because several conflict- 
ing views were presented. Mr. Hallman stat- 
ed that he would not have approached Jerry 
in the manner which he did if Jerry had 
not had a plate in his hand. Two witnesses 
spoke in behalf of Mr. Hallman, but neither 
could recall seeing the plate in Jerry's hand. 
In contrast. Jerry stated that he did not 
have a plate in his hand, and two student 
witnesses verified this fact. As a result, no 
definite conclusions were arrived at concern- 
ing this matter at the hearing. 

The hearing lasted about two and a half 
hours. 





Vol. 40, No. 9 



CLARION STATE COLLEGE — CLARION, PENNSYLVANIA 



Friday, November 22, 1968 



'Herr Biedermann and the Firebugs' Termed 
'Symbolic,' a 'Unique and Exciting Event' 



A FACULTY REVIEW 

By TERRY CAESAR 

The staging of "Herr Biedermann and the 
Firebugs, " continuing through tomorrow at 
the Chapel, is a unique and exciting event. 

Max Frisch's play, first pertbrmed in 1958 
and already a staple of modem drama, seems 
nevertheless a somewhat dated and flabby 
vehicle, and Director Bob Copland has right- 
ly sensed that it needs to be honed for con- 
temporary sensibilities. So he has designed, 
strictly speaking, an "event," or better, an 
experience, to amuse, repulse, engage, and, 
above all, consume. 

It is as an experience, in intent and effect, 
that the evening demands to be taken, and 
if the deliberateness of the former finally 
diminishes the force ol the latter, Mr. Cope- 
land, his cast and staff are to be highly 
commended tor the seriousness, spirit, and 
vigor of their efforts. 

The text, as those familiar with the Living 
Theatre or the off-Broadway productions of 
Tom 0-Horgan will already assume, simply 
provides the occasion for the real "play." 
The story itself is straightforward enough: 
tfie household of a respectable hair-lotion 
manufacturer. Herr Biedermann — who is a 
mixture of bourgeois piety, superficial "con- 
cern," and foolish egotism — is progressively 
seduced, invaded, and destroyed by an impish 
pair of arsonists or firebugs. Ken Miller, 
as Biedermann, and Veronica Smith and Betti 
Ferguson as his wife and maid, respectively, 
are all adequate to their roles, though Mr. 
Miller begins his characterization on too fran- 
tic and earnest a note, and instead of the 
poor fool who, in all the purity of his naivete, 
can't see what's going on in front of his 
own nose we are merely given the stupid 
ass who, in his willful blindness, completely 
deserves his fate. 

John Dorish, as Schmitz. one of the fire- 
bugs» and Steve Brezzo. as Eisenring, the 
other, are given by the dramatist more than 
sheer caricature to work with, and manage 
to sustain real idiosyncrasy. If Schmitz be- 
comes the more successful character, it is 
because he is played for irrepressible, sar- 
donic humor, underlined by a fierce cackle 
that suggests deeply self-indulgent evil; Ei- 
senring's Donald Duck quacking, though con- 
sistently amusing, evokes no similar depth 
of brutality. 

Indeed, one of the problems of the pro- 
duction is that the real brutality, the ex- 
perienced brutality, is provided by the chor- 
us—very effectively and intensely led by 
George Hall. These are the people who attack 



our senses and assault our minds throughout, 
demanding that we see what is happening 
on the stage that is actually our world. 

But we can only see it at best, we cannot 
feel it: Biedermann is too cloddish, his tor- 
mentors too lovable, the text itself too ob- 
vious ior that; the chorus is given the play 
to expound on and no matter how powerfully 
they perform, if their actions and words run 
counter to the message — and in a drama 
about the omnipresence of "fire" they have 
it all, dramatically— we have an evening 
whose effect becomes too diffuse. 

It is all highly entertaining of course: slides 
(from Viet Nam to Tiny Tim), screams (often 
banal: "Why can't people just talk to people, 
not at them?"), jokes ("Spiro Agnew is a 
latent human being") skits (the "graduation 
exercise," for example, is very funny), writh- 
ing bodies, swinging hips, flashing lights, pul- 
sating music, a mild touch of the dirty 
("Would you like a goose? "), a concluding 
dose of the nude — and this is not to mention 
the many gags in the play proper. 

The tempo ranges from the farcial to the 
psychedelic, the situations from the absurd 
to the silly; it is wild, maybe it should be 
wilder (and finally swallow the restraining 
Frisch text in one outrageous gulp), but cer- 
tainly it should all be seen by as many 
as the venerable Chapel can hold. 

But the ignorance and impotence which 
undermine all our choices, the terrible ironic 
distance between our knowledge and the 
world's truth, or the awareness of the force 
of what is not being said — these things are 
not to be found in "Biedermann, " and we 
remain helpless to deal with the firebugs 
of this world, the Schmitzes who paw our 
maids, except, as she does, by slugging them 
in the groin. 



ATTENTION STUDENTS 

The editors of the CLARION CALL are 
planning on changing the flag. The flag is 
found at the top of each issue which reads 
CLARION CALL. We would appreciate your 
ideas since this is YOUR paper. If you like 
the present flag we would like to hear your 
reasons. 

Any student who would like to design a 
new flag is urged to do so and submit it to 
the CALL office as soon as possible. 

We would like to have this change in ef- 
fect by the start of next semester. 



A STUDENT REVIEW 

By SUE FAIR 

A happening took place Wednesday evening 
at the College Chapel with the opening of 
Max Frisch's "Herr Biedermann and the 
Firebugs," which is being presented by the 
Department of Speech and Dramatic Arts 
through tomorrow night. 

The superficial story itself is not out of 
the ordiniiry. It revolves around the life of 
Herr Biedermann (Ken Miller) and Frau Bie- 
dermann (Veronica Smith), and Anna (Betti 
Ferguson), their maid; they take in and are 
taken in by Sepp Schmitz (John Dorish), 
circus wrestler, and Willi Eisenring (Steve 
Brezzo), a headwaiter recently released from 
prison. Both Sepp and Willi delight in the 
destruction of buildings and people by fire. 

Herr Biedermann, manufacturer of hair lo- 
tions, lived in a world of suspicion and fear, 
especially of firebugs, yet he continually re- 
fused to believe the truth about Willi and 
Sepp. He even saw and was confronted with 
the fuses, detonators, and gasoline in the 
attic where Sepp and Willi stayed. In this 
case, the end justifies the means, as Herr 
Biedermann really deserved his end. 

What was really important was the sym- 
bolism behind the cnaracters and their roles. 
This was brought out not only by each actor's 
portrayal of his role, but by Director Bob 
Copeland's use of a "firemen " chorus, ably 
led by George Hall. The hippie chorus is 
what's happening now; their overt actions 
and activities, rioting and dancing in the 
aisles, shouting about life and its decay. 



"forced" many members of the audience to 
participate. 

The chorus related the actions of the play- 
ers to the audience; they tried to warn not 
only Herr Biedermann but also today's so- 
ciety — the members of the audience — to wake 
up to reality. Asking the audience questions 
provided no response, but Dr. Mary Hard- 
wick of the Speech Department, when asked 
what she would do, answered best for the 
whole audience by saying "A fool gives you 
answers but a wise man never talks." 

I enjoyed the play and, though I did not 
quite understand the full extent of the sym- 
bolism, I felt that the play, as a social com- 
ment, gave evidence to convict man of the 
social crime of idly standing by and letting 
social evils go unchecked because he is too 
afraid or too preoccupied with his own affairs 
to be involved. 

The cast included; 

GottUeb Biedermann, Ken Miller: Babette. 
his wife, Veronica Smith; Anna, a maidser- 
vant, Betti Ferguson; Sepp Schmitz, a wrest- 
ler, John Dorish; Willi Eisenring, a waiter, 
Steve Brezzo; a policeman. Terry F. Daum; 
a Ph.D. Theophil Ross; Mrs. Knechtling, Re- 
becca Bartholomew. 

The chorus of firemen: George Hall, lead- 
er; Paul Gaffney, Bob Heimann, Michael 
Elliott, Herb Michaels, Jr., Chris Massena, 
Gary Daurora, Anasarha Leance, Raine Mar- 
tin, Susan Albanesi, Janis Brooks. 

Band: The Scarlet Pumpernickel. 

Directed by Bob H. Copeland; designed by 
Adam F. Weiss; assistant director, Connie 
Kuslolek; stage manager, Connie Alexis. 



CALL Will Resume publication 
On December 13t; Myers Article 
On Student Rights to Be Featured 



Student Center Opened Yesterday 



Yesterday morning, without fanfare and 
ribbon cutting, the lounge and game rooms 
of the Student Center were opened up. 

One half of the former basketball floor 
in Harvey Hall consists of a tasteful fur- 
nished lounge. Matching sets consisting of 
a sofa and several upholstered chairs in the 
same color occupy the room. Black, olive, 
reddish brown, beige, and "off-orange," as 
one student put it, are the colors of the 
matching sets of furniture. End tables, lamps, 
cylindrical urns for cigarette ashes also dot 
the room. A large color television set oc- 
cupies one comer. 

The other half of the large room is occupied 



by 14 pool tables, whose correct name is 
pocket-billiard tables, according to Cecil Cox, 
the night activities supervisor. 

In the former balcony are 11 card tables, 
whose tops have markings for checkers and 
chess playing. At 8 last night. 14 students 
were playing card games in the small game 
room, and another 14 were playing pool. 

The hours for the lounge and game rooms 
will be the same as the hours for the Student 
Union in the bottom floor of Harvey: open 
to 11 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 
on Sunday: open until midnight on Friday 
and Saturday. 



The Clarion Call will not publish 
issue.s on the next two Fridays, Novem- 
ber 29 and December 6. The next is- 
sue will appear on Friday, December 
13. 

. In that issue, which will be the 
only issue in the month of December, 
the Call expects to print an article 
about the role of students in college 
governance and to print brief com- 
ments on the article by several stu- 
dents and several faculty members. 

The article, titled "Communica- 
tion, Participation, and Democracy on 
the Campus," was written by Profes- 
sor Alonzo F. Myers, who was for many 
years chairman of the Department of 
Higher Education at New York Uni- 
versity. Although the article was orig- 
inally published in 1950 in the Harvard 
Educational Review, some of its ideas 
about greater participation by students 
in the determination of college poli- 
cies may be more timely now than 
they were 18 years ago. 



Pool Playing Appears to Be Popular 




ShoHii Above i» the Pool Room of the Newly Openeil (iaiiie aiid Lounge Area of the Stiideut Center 



Increasingly in recent years stu- 
dents on college campuses throughout 
the United States have charged that 
their formal education is irrelevant. 
Increasingly students have asked for a 
greater voice in the determination of 
college pohcies about curriculum, about 
housing regulations, about the selec- 
tion and retention of faculty members, 
and the like. For these reasons ,the 
editors and the advisor of the Call have 
decided to reprint Professor Myers' 
article and to invite several students 
and faculty members to comment on it. 
In general, they will be asked to make 
brief, specific comments on how well 
Clarion State measures up to some ol 
the issues in governing a college which 
Professor Myers discusses. 

The students and faculty members 
are being asked to comment on ques- 
tions such as these: Is there reasonable 
good communication between Clarion 
students and their teachers? Are stu- 
'^eats taking part in student govern- 
ment in a significant way? Are stu- 
dent opinions about curriculum, about 
housing regulations, and the like given 
proper consideration? 

The Call believes that reprinting 
the Myers article and some opinions 
about it— and inviting further com- 
ment in the form of letters to the edi- 
tor — will be a legitimate part of the 
self-examination which all colleges (stu- 
dent body, faculty, administration) must 
do periodically. As Clarion State starts 
its second century, the Call hopes that 
the Myers article may stimulate both 
a current of fresh idea.s and the re- 
examination of sound but forgotten 
ideas. i 

■i . 4 

Michalski Publishes 

Dr. Stanley Michalski, professor of music 
and director of bands at Clarion State Col- 
lege. recenUy had an article. "Discipline in 
the Arts," published in The World of Music, 
a publication devoted to instrumental music. 

In the article, he explained the importance 
of discipline in "all mental and physical as- 
pects that lead to high artistic endeavor." 
He also defines discipline and self-denial in 
respect to the true artist. 



Page 2 



THE CALL -- Clarion State College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



Editorially 
Speaking 



CSC Students Want A Consistent 
Judieiary Board; A Return to the 
Previous Policy is Encouraged 



A recent student protest on this 
cam[)us erupted after a student was 
dismissed from college on a disciplin- 
ary matter. Many students felt that 
the involved student, Jerry Muzyka, 
was treated unfairly. Others felt that 
he deserved to be punished for his ac- 
tions, but that he was prosecuted in 
an unjust manner and that his punish- 
ment was too severe. Regardless of 
these varying viewpoints, an issue was 
raised which deserves careful consider- 
ation. ^ 

As most students know, a petition 
was circulated this week which con-, 
tained a plea to re-establish a disciplin- 
ary board which was abolished in 1965. 
The board consisted of five faculty 
members with one member serving as 
chairman and lour student menibers. 
This board was responsible for all dis- 
ciplinary actions, and acted as a non- 
administrative body, which attempted 
to deal fairly with such disciplinary 
matters. 

Mr. Edward Duffy, associate pro- 
fessor of history, who served as chair- 
man of this judiciary board in 1964, be- 
lieves that "it functioned very well." 
Ke pointed out that each member had 
one vote and that the chairman voted! 
only in the case of a tie. In addition, 
he stated that, as a general rule, stu- 
dents tended to be harder f on -their 
fellow students than the fafM^t^ niem- 
bors were. In any event, the system 
seemed to be a fair way of dealing with 
di.scipline matters. ' f- -^ 

When asked if he. would be in ifav-, 
or of a similar .sy.stem for Clarion stu- 
('<^hts this year, Mr. Duffy stated that: 
"II there would be a t;heck as 'to how' 



appointments are made, 1 would be in 
favor of the re-establishment of this 
judicial committee." 

Responsible students must be chos- 
en to serve on this board if it is put in- 
to effect because of individual pre- 
judices that are present among mem- 
bers of the student body. However, 
it .seems reasonable that the responsi- 
bility of disciplinary matters be placed 
in the hands of those other than the 
administration because administrators 
often make the charges. This being 
the case, a student doesn't stand a 
chance of receiving a totally fair evalu- 
ation because it is highly difficult for 
the accusers to be objective when they 
are also doing the prosecuting. 

The students on this campus de- 
serve to be given a consistent judiciary 
board. A return to the previous poli- 
cy would give the students an active 
part in considering the rights of their 
fellow students. 

F'or this reason, the administra- 
tion is urged to carefully weigh the 
evidence before deciding to accept or 
reject the petition. The students are 
i^&feking administration approval of this 
request — a request which will help to 
stabilize much of the conflict which 
often arises between the administra- 
tion and the student body. 



i 



The students feel that thev need 



this change, and their objections of the 
present system seem to be justified. 
Therefore, this paper endorses the pe- 
tition with the hope that the adminis- 
tration will comply with the wishes of 
the student body. 

— C. W. 



Do Students Need a 'Cut System?^ 



A "cut system" — does one exist 
at Clarion? The college c^oes not have 
nn official cut policy applying uniform- 
ly 'in all departments of the college. It 
has been the policy of the college for 
many vears that the faculty report 
three successive absences to the dean's 
office so that a routine check can be 
made as to the student's whereabouts. 
But no penalty or disciplinary meas- 
ures are attached. 

In the absence of a college-wide 
policy some individual departments 
have established a departmental policy. 
It is probably true in a sitwation where 
there is no departmental fyslicy, that 
the individual instructor lias often 
established his own cut policy. The 
faculty senate of Clarion State College 
has considered a college-wide cut sys- 
tem but has never been able to agree 
on anv acceptable system. 

Why do we need a cut system de» 
vi.sed by the college, the individual de- 
partments, or the instructor? .The stu- 
dehts should be mature enough to real- 
i'e the values that can be attained by 
attending the clas.ses. But if the stu; 
dent can grasp the material that is 
taught and can pass the exaWs, Why' 
should he be penalized for not attend- 
ing the class? 

.Another situation that oftfto Jirises 
is one involving illness. If a srtident 
does not feel well enough to go to cla.ss, 
be certainlv does not feel well enough 
to walk to the infirmary to get excused 
from classes. But this is the normal" 
procedure for procuring a "legal" ab- 
.':r'nce. Logically, if a student can walk 
to the infirmary, he can get to his class. 



The pressures placed upon a stu- 
dent by his professors are great. When 
a student has two or more exams sched- 
uled for the same day, the extra time 
that could be provided for studying 
by not having to attend classes could 
possibly help. But how can one cut a 
class without feeling guilty about the 
"illegal" absence, even if it is to study 
for an exam? 

Edinboro presently has a cut sys- 
tem comparable to the one existing at 
Clarion. But at Edinboro, through the 
combined efforts of students and facul- 
ty, a revised cut system policy is going 
into the final stages of adoption. Their 
proposed cut system entails four basic 
ideas: One, a "cut system" as is pres- 
ently in operation would be abolished 
for upperclassmen; Two, the present 
system would be applicable to fresh- 
men at the instructor's discretion; 
Three, if a student misses a quiz, test, 
or lab, he can be given a "0" for the 
assignment at the instructor's discre- 
tion: and Four, no student after his 
freshmen year can be penalized for any 
class absence. We can see no reason 
why Clarion can not establish a sys- 
tem that is oomnarable to the one being 
devised at Edinboro. 

Professors of CSC, at the end of 
tHfe ."^cmester, when you are making out 
your grades, recall your own experi- 
eiVces in college and the times you may 
have cut a class or the times you want- 
ed, to cut but didn't out of fear of los- 
ing your grade. Try not to drop a stu- 
dent's grade unjustly. 

■ » 

— S. M. D. 



European Proverbs 



ITALIAN PROVERBS: 

One washes the bgdy in vain if one 
does not wash the .soul. 

He who does nq|h^2g maly| ^o ^^^" close to. 



POLISH PROVERBS: 

One often sees bett«r from afar 



blunder. 



Without cake there is no wedding. 



n 



With FoHT ^^^ "^ ^^"^ 

OU viothinq but a *'C'. 



jwey 



3 




Letters to The Editor 



Student Reacts to Editorial Gammas Take a Stand 



To the Editor: 

1 am writing this letter in reference to the 
editorial in last week's Call. I feel that I am 
qualified to write this letter because my 
father is the manager of the cafeteria at 
Duquesne University. Previous to this ap- 
pointment, he was manager oi the cafeteria 
at Steuben ville College. Steuben ville College 
is approximately the same size as Clarion, 
and they pay the same price lor their meals 
as we do. but the meals they are served are 
of a higher quality than the ones that we 
are served. 

For example, they are served steak fre- 
quently and at the dinner meal they are 
served two cuts of meat. At breakfast they 
are served real orange juice and not the 
conglomeration we are forced to drink. The 
three cheapest juices on the market are 
tomato juice, grapefruit juice, and apple 
cider— the three juices we are served every 
mornijig. 

Furthermore, at Steubenville, the students 
are allowed" to choose the type of eggs they 
want, and they are cooked to order so that 
the students do not have to eat cold eggs. 
They can also eat as many desserts as they 
wish. > 

1 feel that the problem is ba|ically one of 
ooor management. If they w'^6 to use a 
ittle imagination, they could find ways to 
save money, but still .serve meals of a higher 
quality and of a larger quantity! 

JOHN HANKEY 

student Comments on Food 

To the Editor: 

I would like to comment on the editorial 
concerning the cafeteria in last week's Call. 
I feel that the preparation of the food is the 
major factor in this issue. 

The food on the whole is undercooked and 
overgreased. Certainly, the food cannot be 
expected to taste exceptionally good because 
of the large quantities it must be prepared in, 
but if they could plan and prepare the menu* 
with more care, the over-all quality of the 
meals could be improved. 

If an optional plan could be introduced, the 
quality of the meals served would have to be 
increased so as to attract enough students 
to purchase a meal ticket so that the cafe- 
teria could operate with a profit. 

WAYNE ELLIS 



To the Editor: 

We are writing this letter in support of a 
plea that is being issued by the students and 
the faculty of CSC. 

It is our opinion that the current system of 
determining disciplinary action is unfair. A 
student brought to trial faces an unwelcome 
.Mgiii ot a Uiuuiiai vMiosfc meinoers work out 
of the Dean of Students office. We feel that a 
jury such as this can be nothing but biased. 

We say: change to a system where a jury 
may be chosen from a cross-section of the 
college community, not a three-office c.ique. 
This new system will need to set a precedent 
and deline its position on matters of decision. 
Since the abolition of a previous judicial 
board, there have been no set rules govern- 
ing the actions of the students. All disciplin- 
ary action was left in the hands of one per- 
son who changed his attitudes as each situa- 
tion arose. This offered little stability as far 
as definite guidelines are concerned. 

We have seen and borne the brunt of the 
decisions made by the current system. Help 
by each .student is necessary to brin^ at)out 
a new one. When the brothers of Alpha 
Gamma Phi are .standing up, will the rest 
of CSC be sitting down? 

ANDY BRINDGER, 

President of Alpha Gamma Phi 

IPC Urges Students to 
Support Petition 

To the Editor: 

At our meeting on Tuesday, Nov. 9, the 
Interirafernity Council was presented with 
a petition which purports to re-establish a 
student- faculty judiciary board. The purpose 
of this board would be to rule on student 
disciplinlry problems. 

We feel that the present system for hand- 
ling such matters could be improved. We feel 
that the judiciary board composed of stu- 
dents and faculty appointees wmdd be a far 
more democratic form of disciplinary action. 

For this reason the Interfraternity Council 
voted unanimously to support the proposals 
of this petition. 

Sincerely yours, 

BOB AMENT, President of IPC 



NSA Invites Students to Join 
Record Club — For a $2 Fee 



By DICK MEARS 

As another service, the National Student 
As.sociaticn o.'fers the student the NSA Re- 
cord Club. Students at Clarion State College 
are now eligible to get the best deal on 
records from NSA. For a lifetime member- 
ship fee of $2, you can take advantage of 
the many bene. its provided by this club. For 
inst. nee, you may choose any LP on any 
lal>el— mono or stereo. Discounts on these 
records range up to 79 percent off with prices 
of some records as low as 99 cents an album. 
Every record is brand new, first quality, 
factory fresh and guaranteed fully returnable. 

The NSA Record Club is no ordinary re- 
cord club. Ordinary clubs make you choose 
from just a few labels, usually their own. 
They make you buy up to 12 records a year, 
at full price, to fulfill your obUgaUon. If 
you forget to return Iheir montiU^ card, ttey 



send you a record you don't want and bill 
you late for $5 or $3. 

NSA, however, lets ^ )u choose anv LP 
on any label including .tcw releases. Tapes 
can be bought without Ui 'txtra" member- 
ship fee demanded by other clubs. As a mem- 
ber of the NSA Record Club, you mav order 
as many or as few, or no .selections at 
all if you so desire. You never nay full price 
for an album and yo" lever pay $1 extra 
for stereo. 

NSA Record Club is an Inu'ererdcit club, 
not ownci*, controlled, or snbsidiicu oy any 
record manufacturer anywHer-;. Therefore, 
they are never obliged bv "company policy" 
to push any one label or honor any manu- 
facturer's price. "Conventional" clubs can't 
keep record prices down because they are 
manipulated by the manufacturers who want 
to itei'p record prices up. 



Friday, November 22, 1968 



Second Annual Band Revue 
Is Held in Tippin Gym 



The Band Members' 
Viewpoint . . . 

By BETTY CURLEY 

A blare of trumpets and a roll of drums, 
and the Second Annual Mnrchiiig Band Hc- 
\uc> had begun. In a deep, resonant voice, 
ti>(- (run major. Cortex Puryear, introduced 
Dr. Stanley Michalski. the director. Cor- 
tez preceded each numt>cr with a short ex 
planation of the circumstances under which 
the music had fir.st been introduced to the 
public. 

One of the numbers played was Song for 
the Young, a tune wrilttn especially lor the 
second annual Band Day Production. This 
tune was directed by the composer, Mr. 
Rex Mitchell, a member of Clarion's music 
faculty. The band enjoyed playin:^ his num- 
bers as well as some arrangemeiits by Mr. 
Burton Hardin, another member of the music 
sla'f. At the end ol the co.icert, the band 
gave a .standing ovation to Mr. Mitchell, in 
grateful acknowledgement lor his services. 

To this member of the band, the size of 
the crowd was surprisin;;. The audience in- 
cluded parents, faculty, townspeople, and ma- 
ny more stuilents than had been cxijected. 
The acou.stics in the new gymnasium helped 
the band in some numbers, but often the 
linal notes of the tunes reverberated alter 
the numbers were ended. This in no way 
detracted from (he music. In fact, Ihe music 
was sonorous and stirring, proving that the 
disciplines of working in a marching band 
hold good in a concert situation. 

In the drum .solos to Slaughter on 10th 
Avenue, Ron Nash, Tom Seng, and Ken Mc- 
Nulty were outstanding. They demonstratt'd 
talents that even many of us in the band 
did not know they possessed. 

.As a last minute addition. Undecided us- 
hered in the second half of the program. 
For many seniors the revue was their final 
appearance with the band, and they played 
their hearts out. And, as band members left 
the gym, the recording of the program could 
be heard, loud and clear, in the night air. 
Despite a little nervousness before the per- 
formance, it did well. Said one player, "I 
felt that it went rather well. The music was 
played with the same spirit we had during 
the games. Along with the good playing goes 
Dr. Michalski's fine directing." 

Cortez put the finishing touches to his sea- 
.son as drum major of the Golden Eagle 
Marching Band by directing the group in 
the college fight song, Carry on for Clarion. 
After a series of encores, the Marching Band 
sea.son was ended for another year. 



Especially interesting were the faces of 
the children; their smiles were indications 
that they enjoyed the show. They particularly 
enjoyed the marches the band played. The 
children stamped their feet to the beat of 
the "Bombasto March," "North and South 
College All-Stars," and 'March Grandio.so," 
which was enhanced by the baton-twirling of 
Janice Hoffman, who performed for the last 
time as Clarion's Golden Girl. 

A special feature of the program was the 
songs written by Rex Mitcheii, assiSi.ani pro- 
fessor of music. "Song for the Young," which 
he wrote for the second annual Band Day, 
was also directed by him. Thi.s song anJ 
his ' Koek on (he Wild Side" have become 
favorites not only of the band but also of 
many of the .students and iaculty. 

Near the end of the program. Dr. Michalski 
gave special recognition to Cort"z Purvear, 
who captivated football crowds with his antics 
as drum major and who served as announcer 
for the program. Corky' then directed 'Car- 
ry on for Clarion," the official Clarion fight 
song. The Alma Mater completed the sche- 
duled performance, but the people remained 
in their seats, and Dr. Michalski led the 
band through .some additional numbers, end- 
ing with "When the Saints Go Marching In." 

Lea\ ing the gym after the program, I over- 
heard such comments as "I really enjoyed 
that," "Wasn't that good!" '1 liked the 
'Song for the Young' the best;" one elderly 
lady in her seventies exclaimed, "My, but 
wasn't tliat nice!" while a student proclaim- 
ed "it was neat." 



Calendar of 
Coming Events 



The Audience's 
Viewpoint . . . 

By SUE FAIR 

A week ago yesterday, the Golden Eagles 
.Marching Band, under the direction of Dr. 
Stanley Michalski, entertained many stu- 
dents, faculty, and Clarion residents when 
they presented their second annual Marching 
Band Revue in Tippin Gymnasium. 

After starting the program with the Na- 
tional Anthem, the band played a composite 
of those songs which they had presented as 
their half-time shows at CSC football games. 
The numbers included such familiar favorites 
as "Camptown Races," "The Stripper," "Ca- 
rousel," and "Autumn Leaves," v/hich had 
been performed especially for the Autumn 
Leaf Festival-Homecoming parade and game 
on October 12. Other favorites were "Bicycle 
Built for Two," and a sports medley, which 
included "Take Me Out to the Ball Game." 

Of special interest to me was the favorable 
reaction of the audience. Although all the 
songs were well received, the audience 
seemed to especially enjoy those theme songs 
from programs which are currently popular 
on television, such as Mission Impossible, 
Gunsmoke, the Lawrence Welk Show (which 
was appreciated more by the older members 
of the audience), and the theme of the United 
Airlines commercial. Another favorite was 
the band's performance of "Slaughter on 10th 
Avenue," arranged by Burton Hardin, as.so- 
ciate professor of music 



TODAY, NOVEMBER 22 

—Rifle: Clarion vs. Indiana, Tippin Gym 
—Play: "Herr Biedermann and the Fire- 
bugs," Chapel, 8:3a p.m. 

SATtlRDAY, NOVEMBER 23 

—Play: "Herr Biedermann and the Fire- 
bugs," Chapel, 8:30 p.m. 

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 26 

—Thank.?gi-vmg recess begins, 5 p.m. 
MONDAY, DECEMBER 2 

— Classes resume 
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4 

—Basketball: CSC vs. Walsh, Tippin Gym, 
8:15 p.m. 

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6 

—Rifle: W. & J. and Carnegie-Mellon, away 
—Student Union Christmas Decorating 

Party, 7 p.m. 
—Christmas Dance: The Supreme Court, 

Gym, 9 p.m. 

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7 

—Basketball: CSC vs. Slippery Rock, away 
—Wrestling Quadrangular Meet: Brockport, 

U. of Mass., Miami U. 
— Concert: Mitch Ryder Revue and the New 
Hudson Exit, Clarion High School Audi- 
torium, 7 and 9 p.m. 

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8 

—Movie: "Tobruk." Chapel, 8 p.m. 
—Children's Christmas Tree Decorating 
Party, Chandler, 7 p.m. 

MONDAY, DECEMBER 9 

t 

—Basketball: CSC vs. Genevi, Tippin Gym, 
8:15 p.m. 

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 11 

— Ba.sketball: CSC vs. Alliance, away 



The Clarion Coll 



CALL Office^ Room J, Harvey Hall 
Clarion State College, Clarion, Penna. 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Carolyn Welesko 

BUSINESS MANAGER Tom Smith 

NEWS EDITOR .^ Sandy Diesel 

FEATTTRE EDITOR 7. Sue Fair 

COPY EDITOR ^ Rosemary Slebodnik 

EXCHANGE EDITOR 1. Peg Foley 

CO SPOT7TS EDITORS .^. Dennis Morrow, Gary Andres 

rTprnT,ATTON MANAGER Pam Rider 

STAFF MEMBERS Elizabeth Curley, Margaret Beierle, 

Ann Rohrbaueh, Ed Wozniak, Gary. Baurora, Larry Carter, 
Georgana Winters, Linda Sonnenfeld, Owen Winters, Dianna 
Cherry. Larilyn Andre, Dick Mears, Bob Toth. Jerry Zary, 
Nancy Sarginger, Judy Summy, Linda Pifer, Knthy Jones 
ADVISOR Richard K. Redfem 



PNPAl 



PEIBffTLFAlIA 




; Friday, November 22, 1968 



THE CALL — Clarion State College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



^ 



t) 



Two Chinese Girls are Impressed 
By Life in America and at CSC 



By ANN ROHRBAUGH 

Two Oriental girls, Margaret Tai and Anita 
Lui, are students at CSC this year. Margaret, 
a sophomore, and Anita, a freshman, are 
both from Hong Kong, but the similarity 
ends there. 

Margaret was born in Hong Kong and lived 
there until 1932, when her family moved to 
the United States. Her father — who graduated 
from a medical school in the U.S., worked 
with refugees during World War II, and had 
established a private practice in Hong 
Kong— decided to move the family to the 
United States because of the better opportun- 
ities for the children, especially in education. 

The family, including Margaret, her par- 
ents, her sister, and two brothers, packed 
their belongings and moved to Collegeville, 
Pa., outside of Philadelphia. There they 
joined her three sisters and one brother who 
had already moved to the United States. 

While in Hong Kong, Margaret attended 
an Anglo-Saxon private girl's school. Though 
the native language of the area is Cantonese, 
a Chinese dialect, all of Margaret's classes 
were conducted in English. Through her fa- 
ther she met many American friends who 
visited in Hong Kong, but she found Ameri- 
can English to be different from the English 
she had learned in school. At first Margaret 
had some problems with the language, but 
she soon adjusted to the American idiom. 

Schools Different 

Margaret found the schools in America to 
be quite different from those she had attended 
in Hong Kong. There the students had more 
subjects than in the United States' schools 
and they had no choice as to which courses 
they wanted to take. The Chinese schools 
also had no type of student council or student 
government as most schools in the U.S. have. 
Margaret added that there are government- 
supported schools, but they are mainly at- 
tended by those students from the families 
with a lower income. Even at these schools 
however a small tuition fee is charged. 

As a business administration major, Mar- 
garet hopes to become a buyer or a repre- 
sentative from a U. S. company in Hong 
Kong. Realizing that this may take several 
years, Margaret would like to return to visit, 
although most of her friends are attending 
schools throughout the United States and Eur- 
ope. 

Anita Lui 

Anita was born in Shanghai on mainland 
China, but she moved to Hong Kon^ when 
she was nine years old. Her father, a cap- 
tain on an American oil tanker, traveled all 
over the world, but when he returned to 
Hong Kong, Anita and her mother would 
go to meet him there. Once Jhey just re- 
mained in Hong Kong so that her father 
could contact them easier and would have 
a family to return to when he was in port. 

In Hong Kong. Anita attended a private 
Ecfiopl. Some of her classes were in English 
and others in various Chinese dialects, so con- 
sequently she is quite fluent in English as 
well as in variations of Chinese. 

'^ere are few colleges in Hong Kong and 
only one university. If Anita had remained 
at home she probably would have become 
an airline hostess and attended night clashes 
to earn enough credits to enter the Univer- 
sity of Hong Kong. Instead she decided to 
come to the United States and applied to 
Clarion. 

Naturally the question that Anita is most 
frequently asked is how she happened to 



hear of Clarion. "Well," she replies, 'I had 
a friend who attended Clarioi\ and I heard 
about it from him." Clarion also appealed 
to her because it offers library science and 
because it is a small college where she would 
be able to meet more people and adju.st 
more easily to the new way of life in ^ 
foreign country. 



Food Change 



The food has been one of the biggest chan- 
ges for Anita. She says the Chinese food 
has more variety of flavors, and she was 
used to fresh fruits and vegetables daily. 
She is anxiously awaiting Thanksgiving and 
Christmas because for Thanksgiving she is 
going home with her roommate who has pro- 
mised her "some good American food." Anita 
plans to visit Margaret's family over the 
Christmas holidays and she is looking for- 
ward to eating Chinese food again. 

Anita says she has found everyone to be 
very friendly and helpful, including her pro- 
fessors who realize that she sometimes does 
not understand all of their English. Anita 
also has trouble understanding the humor 
and sarcasm of Americans. She was sur- 
prised to see American girls wearing slacks 
in public, but she is quickly adjusting to 
the different customs. 

As a library science major, Anita hopes 
to work in a school library and eventually 
earn a master's degree. Presently she thinks 
she may remain in the United States after 
graduation, but she's not yet sure. 

Both Margaret and Anita said that Hong 
Kong is being modernized as the government 
is constructing new apartment buildings in 
an effort to eliminate the slum areas. The 
people are also changing their customs and 
most are adopting clothing and manners 
which are western in origin. 

Concern Expressed 

Margaret and Anita expressed concern 
about the pohtical situation in Hong Kong. 
The island of Hong Kong was ceded by China 
to Britain in 1841. Kowloon and the New 
Territories, both located on the peninsula 
from mainland China, are also under British 
control. Kowloon was ceded to Britain in 1860 
and the New Territories were leased to her 
in 1896 for 99 years. Both girls doubt that 
China will renew the lease for the New Terri- 
tories and that Communist China will take 
over the area. 

Anita said that there have been recent 
protests in Hong Kong about the American 
policy in Vietnam. A union strike concern- 
ing the raise in ferry prices was the excuse 
for the Communists to stir up trouble in 
Hong Kong. Anita said that many people 
were quite upset and thought the Commun- 
ists were taking over. In fact, some even 
fled the country and came to the United 
States. Things have settled back to normal 
now, however. 

Anita and Margaret are good friends and 
enjoy discussing various places in Hong Kong 
and conversing in Chinese. Both seem to 
miss their native country at times, but on 
the whole they enjoy college hfe in America. 

PINS, RINGS AND BELLS 

BELLS 

Douglas Callen, TKE, to Ginny Carlson, 
AST. 

Dennis R. Liberatore, Sigma Tau Gamma, 
to Sandra J. Greaves, McKeesport Hospital 
School of Nursing. 

Paul Morris, TKE, to Georgia Layton, CSC. 

Fred Kluck, CSC, to Becky Morgan, CSC. 




Pictured above, from left to right, are Anita Lui and Margaret Tai 



EMERSON DRIVE-IN 

Dining Room and Take Out 



FEATURING 



ASTRONAUTS 
BASKET DINNERS 



SUBMARINES 
STEAKS 



25c Car Wash In Rear 

OPEN FROM 6 A. M. TO 12 MIDNIGHT 
2 Minutes East of the College 



A Peek At Greeks 



ZETA TAU ALPHA 

The Zetas would like to announce their ser- 
vice projects for the coming year: gifts to 
the mental institution, visits and baskets of 
fruit to the old folks' home, mending of spe- 
cial garment.s for the mentally retarded and 
adoption of an orphan. 

The present project is the donation of mon- 
ey by the sisters and donations by the cam- 
pus encouraged by the pledges. This money 
will be given to CARE for Thanksgiving din- 
ners lor needy children. 

DELTA ZETA 

Last Thursday the sLsters of Delta Zeta 
visited all their pledges at Uieir respective 
dorms. The pledges were serenaded and 
were then presented with a sign made by 
their big sisters. The signs are pink and 
green in the form of pledge paddles, and |v'e , 
are very happy and proud to see seventeen 
new signs on the girls' doors, — - 

Delta Zetas are your slaves for a day. The 
DZs and pledges will sponsor a slave dayon 
Saturday, December 7. The girls will be 
hired out for a minimum wage of $1 an hour. 
Anyone interested should please call Karen 
Monborne, 2269988; Sandy Brody, 226-9968; 
Linda Rockhill, 226-9964; Lorrie David," 226- 
9878; or any other Delta Zeta. The girls will 
be happy to do any odd jobs or help you ad- 
dress Christmas cards, wrap gifts, etc. 

Our pledges have only a few more wee]s;s< 
left in their pledge period. This week the 
girls sported pink and green aprons. In Ihe 
remaining weeks of pledging be on the look- 
out for tennis shoes, garters, and boxes filled 
with goodies for the sisters. 

ALPHA SIGMA TAU 

YeUow roses and AST love go out to Sister 
Ginny Carlson and Doug Callen on their re- 
cent marriage. 

The sisters of AST plan to attend the soror- 
ity get-together this Sunday. This is a step in 
making sororities closer and we thank the 
pledges for their invitation. 

PHI SIGMA EPSILON 

The brothers are proud of their new ad- 
visor, Mr. Fueg, who refereed the brother- 
pledge game this past weekend. A "get well 
soon" note is sent to Bud Schmader, who was 
sent to the Clarion Hospital for a head injury. 

Congratulations to Phil Payne, for his elec- 
tion to the secretary-treasurer of IPC. 

SIGMA TAU GAMMA 

The brothers of Sigma Tau Gamma are 
proud to announce the beginning of the long- 
awaited house renovation. We now not only 
have to dip into our pockets for admittance 
into the house, but have to wipe our feet to 
protect our new carpeting. Draperies and a 



color TV are on order for the near future. 
Ccntributions to the house renovation fiuid 
are being taken by all brothers in exchange 
for one raffle ticket which could win someone 
a hundred dollar savings band. 

Congratulations are extended to Robert 
"Bo " Ross and Cheryl Bowser on their im- 
pending wedding. 

Ron Dalby and Larry Hanna both have had 
to withdraw because of medical reasons. We 
all are looking forward to having them back 
next semester. 

The Sig Taus would like to announce their 
pledge class foB this semester. They are: 
Jack Reigel, Rob Hammer, Jack Breman, 
John fulak, Bob Niznik, Alan Kiester, Kerm 
Schalis, Bill Jones, Jack Copper, Gary Hol- 
soppfe. Rick Morgart, Paul Jadgvian, Joe 
Dudzinsky, Jim WiUiamson, Pat Golden, and 
John Balko. 

tireeks Have 



New Addition: 
Beta Xi Omega 

Pan Hellenic Council has added another 
sorority to the .six already familiar on cam- 
rpus. On Nov. 13, Beta Xi Omega was officially 
recognized as a local sorority. 

The colors are gold and brown, and the 
girls wear round silver lavaliers. The group 
is already contacting national sororities, in 
an attempt to expand. One national sorority 
under consideration is that of Phi Mu. 

The sorority consists of 16 girls, mostly 
sophomores. Julie Tompos is president; Di- 
ane Carver, vice president, song leader, and 
pledge mistress; Connie MUliken. treasurer; 
Cindy Leese, recording secretary; Linda 
Cooper, corresponding secretary; Lynn Helt, 
historian; Chris McKnight, active Pan-Hellen- 
ic representative; and Jean McEwen, silent 
Pan-Hellenic representative. 

The other members are Cathy Decker, Mar- 
ilyn Everett, Karen Dixon, Barb Pellican, 
Janean Garmong, Donna Blair, Elizabeth 
Curley, and Ramona Faulkner. Mrs. Pae is 
the advisor. 

A social project is in the planning stages, 
under the chairmanship of Janean Garmong, 
and Barb Pellican heads the committee for 
a money-making project. 



SONS EARNED $3 MILLION 

WASHINGTON. Pa.— Adios, greatest stal- 
lion of all horse breeds, who stood in Wesrtem 
Pennsylvania, is the only sire to produce 
colts which won over $3 million in a year. 



■, Dtl (K'196a lni,f..«t.6",l PT«,(,(Ccir> 




Playtexinvents the first-day tampon 

(We took the inside out 

to show you how different it is.) 

Outside: it's softer and silky (not cardboardy). 
Inside : it's so extra absorbent ... it even protects on 
your first day. Your worst day! 

In every lab test against the old cardboardy kind. .. 
the Playtex tampon was always more absorbent. 
Actually 45 % more absorbent on the average 
than the leading regular tampon. 

Because it's different. Actually adjusts to you. 
It flowers out. Fluffs out. Designed to protect every 
inside inch of you. So the chance of a mif hap 
is almost zero! _^ ^ ._. *_ — .v^ 

Why Uve in the past? " pmVtCX 

tampons 



Page 3 



New Committees and Members 



Are Approved by Student Senate 



At the Student Senate meeting held Wed-' 
nesday, the members of the new Faculty- 
Student Committee were unanimously ap- 
proved. These new committees are the 
ones proposed by Tom Paolino, president of 
Student Senate, in October. At that time, it 
was proposed that there would be six new 
committees, but a committee for fraternities 
and sororities has been added. 

The seven new committees and their mem- 
bers are: Food and Dining— Linda Ewing, 
Cathy Pernazza, Willie Sanders, and Bill Wil- 
dier; Fraternities and Sororities— Thomas 
Griffin, Tom Parsons, Lin Myers, and Judy 



Michaux; Cultural Affairs— Dave Stewart, 
John Donlin, Paul Shellgren, and Carol My- 
coff. 

Social Affairs— John Schmidt, James Hoff- 
man, Ed Golembiesky, and James Mondale; 
Student Publications— John Zahoran, Mike 
Hinderliter, Thomas Rusalem, and Diane Cul- 
ley. 

Orientation Committee— M a r I o Ros.setti, 
Robert R. Flaus, Jim Greer, and Jan Johns- 
ton; and the Housing Committee— Phyllis Ro- 
mano, Janet Kochin, Dan Uber, and Dennis 
Martin. 



Faculty Trio to Perform Dec. 4 



The Clarion State College Faculty Trio com- 
posed of David Mallory, violinist, Vahe Ber- 
berian, cellist, and Robert Van Meter, piani.st. 
will be featured in a faculty recital on Wed- 
nesday, Dec. 4, at the College Chapel at 
8 p.m. Mrs. Barbara Hardin will also assist 
in this recital. 

The program will consist of Haydn's Trio 



in C Major, Mozart's Piano Quartet in G 
Minor, and Beethoven's Trio in C Minor. 
Though Haydn and Mozart were older con- 
temporaries of Beethoven, these compositions 
were written approximately at the same time 
—that is, within the scope of ten years (1785- 
1795). These compositions are among the 
Viennese Classic Chamber Music. 



CLARION 
DRY CLEANING CO. 

OFFERS YOU: 

• 1 Hour Dry Cleaning 

• Shirt Laundry • Tailoring 

• Formal Wear Rentals 

541 LIBERTY STREET CLARION 

PHONE 226-6121 

OPEN MON. . FRI. 'TIL 9 P.M. 

CLOSE SAT. AT 6 P.M. 



College Book Store Annual 

CHRISTMAS 

Book and Gift Sale! 

Starts Wednesday^ Dec. 4 




JUST IN TIME FOR CHRISTMAS! Fasoinat- 
iufj bookfii,, on all stibjeols, are being offered 
in thi^ big book sale at truly amazing savings. 
They can provide you, your family and 
friends with hours of fun, information and 
diversion. Many of these books are profuse- 
ly illustrated, luxiu'iously bound, and true 
collector's items. Many children's books are 
included. 

SPECIALLY PRICED AT $1 to $7.95 

(Originally published at 2.95 to 15.00) 



Imported Gift Bazaar 

Hundreds of items at very reasonablie prices. 
Many never available before. Ideal for gifts. 






SPANISH JEWELRY 
GREEK PAPERWEIGHTS 
AFRICAN WOODCARVINGS 
MEXICAN POTTERY 



FINNISH GLASSWARE 
TAIWAN WOOD CARVINGS 
ITALIAN MARBLE 
BOOK ENDS, ETC. 



Woodwore by Adams 

A fine assortment of end-grain Cutting Blocks, 
Table Mats, Millwheels and Squares hand crafted 
of end-grain sugar maple and very oul-of-tlie-ordin- 
ary. Beautiful but practical. 

Wff' n Proof-Games for Thinkers 

The Rage of the Sage Age! Students, Professors, 
everyone ig fascinated. These engrossing brain 
games, like books, are authored by University pro- v 
fessors and other subject specialists, who take re- ^ 
gponsibility for the educational contents. 

Souvenir Stuffed Toys 

*' These are new and different. All with the college ^ 

stamped souvenir ribbon. Y ou'll love them and so ^ 
will the lucky gift recipient! \ 

College Book Store 



Page 4 



THE CALL — Clarion State College, Clarion. Pennsylvania 



Friday, November 22, 1968 




Eajiles 2iicl ill West Freshman Team Looks Good^ 



Wm 



Pictured above are the Golden Eagle wrestlers for the 1968-69 season. Returning this season are eight l^termen. 



Foollmll Team 
To Lose 12 Men 

When the Clarion State Golden Eagles 
closed out tlieir lootball season Nov. 9 
against Slippery Rock, there were 12 men 
who played their last game lor the Blue 
and Gold. 

Nine are irom the defensive unit and the 
other three from the offense. For the defense 
they are: Roy Smeltz, safety; Fred Wicks- 
trom, defensive halfback; Fran Sirianni, safe- 
ty; Paul McDowell, defensive end; Art Tra- 
gesser, linebacker; Bob Gevaudan, defensive 
tackle; George Pasierb, defensive tackle; 
Jim Jones, defensive tackle; and Rick Mc- 
Williams, defensive end. Five holes will be 
Icfl in the defensive line and four in the 
secondary line. 

Cnlibor of Men High 

The offensive team won t be so hard hit 
since ,;?raduation will take only three players. 
They are: Jim Becker, wingback; Bill Wise, 
fullback; and Joe Lavella, guard. 

Its not so much how many graduation 
takes, but the caliber of men it takes. Becker 
is Erdeljac's prime target. His sure hands 
have caught many a touchdown pass, in- 
cluding the winning pass from Jim Alcorn 
in the 1936 championship ganae. unabliag^Cla- 
rion to defeat Chester, 28-26. Wise was Cla- 
rion's hard nosed fullback who would pick 
up the yard or two in a third down and 
short yardage situation. Joe Lavella is an- 
other member of the list of unsung heroes 
who played in "the pit." Game after game, 
Joe wouid do his job and do it well without 
much recognition except from the players 
and the coaches. 

On the other side of the line stand five 
very tall men (averaging 6 feet, 1 inch, and 
weighing 208 pounds). They are McDowell 
and McWilliams at ends and Gevaudan, Pa- 
sierb. and Jones at tackle. These are the 
men who dish out all the punishment in try 
ing to get to the quarterback and get pun- 
ished in return. The brutality that goes on 
in the line can be compared to when the 
Christians were thrown to the lions. 

Imprensive Record 

Backing up the line is Art Tragesser. The 
linebacker is the balance between the line 
and the .secondary, guarding against the run 
but always alert for the pass. A linebacker 
figures in at least 40 percent of the plays. 
Art has been a bulwark of strength in filling 
this position. 

In the secondary. Clarion is retiring three. 
They are Smeltz, Wickstrom, and Sirianni. 
These players put up an umbrella of protec- 
tion in delending against the pass, but they 
have to be quick to react in coming up 
for sweeps. 

Through the year, these 12 players have 
been the leaders of the team and have given 
guidance to the younger players through their 
experiences. 

Of these seniors there have been four who 
have obtained the player of the week award 
this past year — Wickstrom for his perfor- 
mance in the Geneva game, Wi.se in the 
Mansfield game, Jones against Lock Haven, 
and Becker again.st Indiana. 

Over the three years these men have been 
playing togethar, they have played their part 
in compiling a 29 and .5 record; 10 and 
in 1966. 8 and 2 in 1967, and 6 and 3 in 
19C8. a very impressive record for any team. 



A REMINDER . . . 

A reminder: The studrnis of Clarion can 
plan a l)ig weekend in December. 

On Friday, Deceniher 6, the Supreme 
<'oitrt, an eieven-piece group, will be fea- 
tured at A dance to be held in Chandler 
Dining Hall from 9-12:30. 

Saturday, Drtembcr 7, the Mitch Ryder 
Revue and the Now Hudson Exit will be 
featured in a concert at the Clarion High 
School Auditorium. Shows will be at 7 and 9. 

Studenl.s may attend both activities for $.{ 
and an ID card. For those without ID cards, 
i( uili rosl SI. .50. Ilsiwever, a person ma.v 
purchase as many as four tickets. 

Tiet-ets vull go on sale Wednesday in 
Chandb r and the Student I'nion. One weeK 
before (he pcr'ormaiices. tickets will also 
he sold to area hifih Mhool students. Col- 
lege students should get their tickets early, 
since t'n < ;>i»ac ity of the auditorium for 
each show is 2,n<!it. 



Grapplers Look Forward to a 
Good Year; Team to Travel 
To Annapolis, Md., Tuesday 



Clarion's wrestlers travel to Annapolis, 
Md., on Tuesday for their first exhibition 
against the Naval Academy. This preseason 
match will be a good preview of the team's 
strengths and weaknesses. 

Last year the matmen, coached by Robert 
Bubb and Neil Turner, finished with an 11-2 
record and a fourth place in the Pennsylvania 
State College Conference, which Coach Bubb 
termed as "disappointing." Clarion also 
placed 11th in the NAIA, which is composed 
of 67 teams; for the first time, Clarion com- 
peted in the NCAA, where they finished in 
a tie for 42nd place out of the 103 teams 
competing. 

As a base for this yjear's squad, Coach Bubb 
has eight returning lettcrmen. They are: Ray 
Day, 115-pound class, who finished third in 
the PSCC; Phil Detore, 123-pound class, who 
finished first in the PSCC; Don Knisely, 130- 
pound class; Bob Tcagarden, 137-145-pound 
classes; Doug Niebel, 152-pound class, who 
finished fourth in the PSCC; Bob Schmidt, 
160-pound class, who finishea fourth in mt 



PSCC; Santo Ricotta, 177-pound class, who 
finished second in the PSCC; and John Sch- 
mader, 191-pound class. 

Eliminations are now in progress to de- 
termine who will fill the 11 weight classes. 
Coach Bubb stated that the team is possibly 
stronger than it was last year in the weight 
classes of 115 pounds to 167 pounds. His only 
questionable weight classes are 177 pounds, 
191 pounds, and the unlimited class. John 
Schmader and four promising sophomores 
are now vying for these positions. These hea- 
vyweights hold the key to improving last 
year's record; if these grapplers come 
through. Clarion has an excellent chance to 
win the PSCC wrestling crown. 

The team officially opens its season on 
Saturday, Dec. 7, in a quadrangular tourna- 
ment in Tippin Gym which will feature Ho- 
ward University of Wa.shington, D.C., Brock- 
port State College of New York, and Frost- 
burg College of Maryland. The meet begins 
at 10:30 a.m. and the finals begin at 4 p.m. 



Although a little disappointed in failing to 
take three Western Conference (PSCAC) 
titles in a row, statistics show the Golden 
Eagles have much to be proud of in copping 
the second place spot. 

Never one to rest on his laurels, Coach Al 
Jacks nonetheless can find some real satis- 
faction in his record since coming to Clarion 
State College in 19u3. After posting a 4-4 
slate that year, he stepped out to tie for 
second place in 19J4, sewed up the second 
slot in 1935, and copped the conference tro- 
phies in 19 J6 and 1967. 

A look at this season's card shows the 
Eagles garnering 228 points to 131 for the foes 
and a most impressive total yardage figure 
of 3148 to 2540. Touchdowns made were 32-18 
and points after touchdown .stand at 31 14. 
The Jacksmen accounted for one safety but 
were lacking in the field goal department 
while the opponents racked up three. 

In total first downs, Clarion State was out 
in front. 135 129, This represented 48 first 
downs rushing to the oppositions' 67; first 
downs passing, 77-50, and first downs on pen- 
alties. 10-12. 

On the ground, the Eagles mounted 424 
rushes to 436 for the foes, representing a 
1540 1576 yardage figure. Rushing losses, 
however, were 205-318, yielding a net gain 
of 1335 for Clarion and 1258 for the rivals. 

In the passing category, the Jacksmen 
showed their greatest strength, attempting 
258 to 230 for the foes. Completions showed a 
136-101 figure. They intercepted 17 passes 
and had 13 of their own intercepted. 

At their best in tlie air, the Eagles lived 
up to their name in winging for 1813 yards 
against 1282 for the opposition. 

In other statistics, the Clarion State squad 
booted 46 punts to 59 for the rivals, barely 
shading them, 34.4-34.3, in punting averages. 
They bested the competition, 306-125, in yards 
gained on punt returns, but fell behind, 442- 
469, in yardage on kickoff returns. 

Penalties took their toll this year, with the 
Eagles set back 481 yards for infractions to 
383 for the opponents. In fumbling, however, 
it was 9-19, and seven of these were lost 
against 13 for the foes. 

Open House to Be Held 

A wrestling demonstration by the members 
and coaches of the team will be featured 
at an open house Thursday, Dec. 5, in the 
North Gym of Tippin Gymnasium. 

A discussion of the points and sconng sys- 
tem will also be held so that anyone who 
attends the matches will better understand 
the procedures. A special attraction will be 
the final elimination match between Gar>' 
Holsopple and Larry Strong, both heavy- 
weights. 



Tiger or lamb: 
who makes 
the best CPA? 




Men who move in flocks don't make 
the best CPAs. 

The CPA often hunts for answers 
in wild new country. He's constantly 
trying to solve problems that have no 
pat solutions. He needs conceptual 
imagination and conviction — and 
guts. He may have to defend his an- 
swers (like a tiger) when he thinks 
he's right. 

The demand for CPAs is growing 
fast. Whether they are in independent 
practice or part of the top manage- 
ment team of a company, they are 
taking on increasing responsibility in 
financial and business affairs. 

You can select the college courses 
that can help you earn a CPA certifi- 
cate 8oon after graduation. Or you 
can take them in graduate school. 
Ask your faculty advisor about them. 

It you**!! drop a card or note to us, 
we'll be glad to send you a booklet 
with the whole jCPA story. 

Write: Dept. AD-1. PICPA, 1100 
Lewis Tower Bldg., Phila., Pa. 19102. 

Read it before you decide whether 
your answer to our question is ''G-r- 
r-r" or "li-a-a-a." 

Pennsylvania Institute of 
Certified Public Accountants 



Close Out Season With 3-2 Record 



Prospects for continued good football at 
Clarion State looked brighter than ever as 
the Golden Eagle freshmen closed out their 
five-game schedule Monday with a 21-0 win 
over Edinboro. 

It was a rewarding series for freshman 
coach, Neil Turner, whose fledglings came 
back strong in the final trio of games after 
a disappointing start in losing to Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania (25-7) and Slip- 
pery Rock (14-8). 

Recovering in fine fashion, the Eagles were 
not scored on again, while scoring 65 points 
over the opponents in the last three outings. 

Four freshman running backs had over 
three yards per play carrying average in 
the persons of Gary Munsch, Fred Rost and 
Tom Olszewski, of Pittsburgh, and Jeff Tho- 
mas, Erie. Nine players scored the season's 
12 touchdowns. 

Quarterback hopeful Will Roncone, Corao- 
polis, who threw seven touchdown passes over 
the season, scored the only marker in the 
opening contest against Indiana on a one-yard 
run. Gary Maschak, Johnstown, kicked the 



extra point. 

Bill Bann, Glenshaw, broke into the scor- 
ing column against Slippery Rock, with Jeff 
Thomas running Jhe two-point conversion. 

Snapping into high gear against California, 
Turner's hopefuls scored a 130 shutout. John 
Mauro, Oakmont, capitalized on a 13-yard 
pass from Roncone. Bann scored the other 
tally on a one-yard run with Maschak con- 
verting one extra point. 

Avenging their earlier defeat by Slippery 
Rock, the young Eagles drubbed the Rockets, 
31-0. Munsch scored on a five yard run, Pitts- 
burgh's Dave Jennings scored two markers 
on eight and 62yard pass plays, and Kent 
Hart, Punxsutawney, and Fred Rost scored 
on 18-yard runs and 13yard pass plays, re- 
spectively. Maschak kicked the one extra 
point. 

Sweetest of all was the final 21-0 victory 
over Edinboro, who had previously beaten 
Indiana, 52-6. Rost scored on a three-yard 
run, Munsch on a one yarder and Bann on 
a 11 yard pass play. Maschak kicked all three 
extra points. 



Piiday, November 22, 1968 



THE CALL 



Clarion State College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



Page 5 



Seniors Finish College Grid Careers 




JL "Amore" by 

( onange hlo»HOtn 

In Itolion it means "I lovo you." 

Three diomonds, one 

for eoch of the three words, encased in 

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you his promise. Orange Blossom gives you 

ours: If your ring is lost, stolen or 

damaged during the Hrst year of 

purchcis.e, Oronge BlossQrri*lll •"'*" 

replace if without charge. 

Now you have two promises. 

^more by Oronge Blossom- $325.00 







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CLARION, PA. 



Member American Gem Society 



ART TRAGESSER 



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JIM JONES 



BOB GEVAUDAN 



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f 



Page 6 



THE CALL 



Clarion State College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



Friday, November 22. 1968 



A PROFILE OF FOUR LETTERMEN 

Four Basketball Players are 
Featured; Team Prepares for 
Season Opener, December 4 



Clarion's basketball team, coached by John 
Joy and Thomas Beck, practices two hours 
nightly in preparation for their opening game 
against Walsh College on December 4. Of 
the 13 men on the team, three are seniors 
who will be playing in their last college bas- 
ketball games, five are juniors, and five are 
sophomores. This is the first in a series 
of articles featuring the individual players. 




JOE CHALMERS 

Captain of the Golden Eagles squad is Joe 
Chalmers, a 5-foot, 9-inch, 165-pound guard 
from Stoneboro, Pa., where he played bas- 
ketball for I^akeview High School. Joe, who 
will be doing student-teaching next semester, 
is a geography major in the secondary ed- 
ucation curriculum. After graduation, he 
plans to teach in high school and to coach 
a basketball team. 

Besides basketball, he is a member of Al- 
pha Gamma Phi and he likes to golf. Joe 
is married to the former Robin Fletcher, 
also of Stoneboro. 

Last season, in addition to his position as 
captain and playmaker, Joe scored a total 
of 242 points in 16 games, for an overall 
average of 15 points per game. 

Returning this season after a year's in- 
eligibility for a technical violation of both 
the National Collegiate Athletic Association 
and the Pennsylvania State College Confer- 
ence for participating in a post-season Johns- 
town tournament are Larry Kubovchick and 
Bob Fusco. 




Ui T\Il\t\ii 



BOB>FUSCO 

Bob Fusco is a 6-fQ(t)t, 3-inch, 200-pound 
forward from Ellwood City High School, 
whrre he played basketbstil for three years. 
He loo is a geography ma^r in the secon- 
dary education curriculum w;no will al.so be 



Pre-Season Warmup 
To Be Held Monday 

Basketball at Clarion State College will get 
underway at 7:30 p.m. Monday when the 
Golden Eagle hoopsters stage a pre-season 
warmup Blue and Gold game. 

The inter-squad contest will be the first 
regulation game on the new Tippin Gym- 
nasium floor. In addition to its morale-build- 
ing effect, the game will permit coaches to 
evaluate their material and strategy prior 
to the first intercollegiate home contest with 
Walsh College on Dec. 4. 

Played under regular basketball rules, the 
game will see Coach John Joy separate his 
squad into two teams composed of equal 
parts of veteran and novice material. 

A diving exhibition will follow the game 
featuring freshmen swimmers Pat Kiehl and 
Tom Brandtonies in addition to Donald Leas. 
Clarion State director of health, physical ed- 
ucation and recreation. 

Pat and Tom are former varsity swimmers 
at Valley High School, New Kensington, and 
Baldwin High School, Pittsburgh, respective- 
ly. 

The public is cordially invited to view these 
exhibitions and to inspect the basketball and 
swimming facihties at Tippin Gymnasium. 



student teaching next semester. Like Joe, 
Bob hopes to teach and later to coach his 
own team. 

In addition to being a member of Alpha 
Gamma Phi, Bob is interested in most sports, 
especially football and basketball. Practically 
every Sunday afternoon in the fall, he can 
be found watching the pro games on televi- 
sion. He also appreciates good music and 
good novels. 

In 19C6, Bob was the team's second highest 
scorer and leading rebounder, as well as 
a Western Conference all-star second team 
choice. 




LARRY KUBOVCHICK 

Larry Kubovchick also plans to teach and 
to coach. He is a 6-foot, 2-inch, 185-pound 
forward from Bishop McCort High School 
in Johnstown. Next semester, he too will 
be doing his student teaching in his major 
field of social studies. He is also a member 
of Alpha Gamma Phi, and he lists his inter- 
ests as his classes and the piano. 

Following the 1966-67 season, Larry was 
a unanimous first team all-star choice in 
the Western Conference, as well as Clarion's 
leading scorer. He was also the third leading 
scorer in the Pennsylvania State College Con- 
ference. 




DENNIS LUCE 

Dennis Luce, a 5-foot, ll-inch, 180-pound 
junior Irom Jeannctte High School, is playing 
his second year as a guard on the varsity 
squad. He is majoring in geography and, 
like many of his teammates, he hopes to 
teach and coach upon graduation. He enjoys 
good music and he likes to read good novels. 

In the 18 games last season, Denny scored 
289 total points for a 16-point-per-game aver- 
age. 



Admission Rates 
Arc Aiiiioiinccd 

Admission rales for basketball and wrest- 
ling have been announced by Ernest John- 
son, ticket manager for these events. 

Clarion State College students who have 
paid their activity fee will be admitted to the 
events by their ID cards. Anyone who has 
not paid their activity fee and would Uke to 
attend, the prices are as follows; 

Reserved season ticket for both wrestling 
and basketball— $15.00. 

Individual season tickets for basketball 
games--$12.,50. 

Individual season tickets for wrestling 
matches— S7. 50. 

Individual .season seat tickets for either 
basketball or wrestling — SI. 50. 

General admission ticket — $1.00. 

Visiting college student admission — $1.00. 

Student admission tickets (high school age 
or under)— $.50. 

Anyone desiring a ticket or season pass 
should get in touch with Mr. Johnson. Room 
132. Pcirce Hall, Extension 355. 

Clarion students are also reminded to bring 
their ID cards and to enter at the northeast 
door of Tippin Gymnasium. 



BASKETBALL SCHEDULE — 1968-69 

December 4 — Walsh Home 

December 7 — Slippery Rock Away 

December 9 — Geneva Home 

December 11 — Alliance Away 

December 13 — Edinboro Home 

December 16-17 — Troy, Alabama Tournament Away 

at Troy, Alabama 

December 27-28 — Christmas Tournament — Indiana Away 

at Indiana 

January 6 — Point Park Home 

January 8 — California Away 

January 11 — Fredonia Away 

January 18 — Bloomsburg Away 

January 27 — Slippery Rock Home 

February 1 — Indiana Home 

February 4 — Lock Haven Home 

February 8 — California Home 

February 14 — Mansfield Away 

February 15 — Lock Haven Away 

February 18 — Edinboro Away 

February 20 — Grove City .;... Home 

February 25 — Alliance Home 

February 28 — Walsh Away 

March 3-4 — Conference Play-off East 

Freshman games at 6:15 p.m. — Varsity games at 8:15 p.m. 



Rifle Team is Defeated future fucks 



The Clarion State rifle team dropped the 
first of its 16 matches to Allegheny College 
last Friday night at the new Tippin Gymna- 
sium range by a score of 1257 to 1303. 

Craig Bates was high scorer for the Golden 
Eagles with a 259. Jim Daley was second 
with a 257. 

Fields scored high for the Cators with a 
275. 
CLARION— 

C. Bates 100 93 66 259 

J. Daley 96 79 82 257 

W. Chessman 93 84 70 247 

D. Emerick 95 85 67 247 

fi. Larson 92 78 77 247 

Totals ; 1257 

ALLEGHENY— 

Fields i 97 92 86 275 

March 98 90 86 274 

Reilly 96 89 78 263 

Rudolph 95 92 69 256 

Layng 93 78 64 235 

Totals 1303 



Continuing at the Garby until Wednesday 
is the German imiwrt "Helga." Beginning 
Sunday, Dec 1, when students return, will be 
"A Time to Sing ' starring Hank Williams, Jr. 
and Shelley Fabares, and "Kiss the Other 
Sheik" featuring Marcello Mastroiannei and 
Pamela Tilfin. 

On Dec. 4 begins "Up the Junction" star- 
ring Suzy Kendall and Dennis Waterman. 

Following Sean Connery in "Shalaho" at 
the Orpheum Sunday will be James Coburn 
in "The President's Analyst." On Sunday, 
Dec. 4, starts "Paper Lion" starring Alan 
Alda, the story of a newspaper sports editor 
who decides to get a firsthand view of pro- 
fessional football by joining the Detroit Lions. 

In case students are interested in what 
they will be missing over the vacation: At 
tlie Garby will be "Will Penny" starring 
Charlton Heston, while at the Orpheum will 
be two chillers, "The Vengeance of She" and 
"The Lost Continent." 



Gammas Win 
Championship 



will function better to the benefit of all, if 
there is an increase in communication, par- 
ticipation and sportsmanship by those in- 
volved in the program." 




Happy Thanksgiving!! 

TO ALL CSC STUDENTS 
from 

Town & Country 1 Hr. Dry Cleaner 
and 4 Hr. Shirt Laundry 




In a hard-fought championship playoff 
game. Alpha Gamma Phi defeated Sigma 
Tau Gamma, 26-24. John Lukas quarterback- 
ed the Gammas and Mike Dominick called 
the signals for the Sig Taus. These two 
teams finished at the top of the six-team 
Packer League, while Tau Kappa Epsilon and 
Phi Sigma Kappa placed first and second in 
the Colt League. 

Charles Nanz, new director of intramurals 
activities, expressed both satisfaction and 
concern with the completion of this, the first 
major competition of the year. 

The football results gave the first points 
toward the All-Sports trophy; these points 
are awarded to each team which places in 
the various events. Standings thus far are: 

Alpha Gamma Phi 10 points 

Sigma Tau Gamma 6 points 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 4 points 

Phi Sigma Kappa 2 points 

This week concludes the co- recreational 
volleyball tournament; the men's intramural 
volleyball tournament will get underway af- 
ter the Thanksgiving vacation. Team compe- 
tition is made up of the fraternities and the 
dorms— Elk, McKean, and Forest Manor. 
There are also individual sports, like bowl- 
ing and chess, in which any full or part-time 
student may participate. 

Mr. Nanz said this week: "I'm pleased 
with the cooperation and attitudes of most of 
the individuals and groups participating. 
However, I do feel the intramural program 



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LETTER TO THE EDITOR 



President Accepts Petition; 
Committee to Be Appointed 



In (be last issue of the CALL, an editorial 
uas published which endorsed a petition 
snrportin;; the esiablishinent of a judicial 
body at Clarion. The following is an open 
reply from President Gemmell to the en- 
tire student body, faculty, and adminis- 
tration. 

FJditor, The CaU: 

The petition concerning di.iciplinary proced- 
ures, which you reported in the Call before 
Thanksgiving, was received in my office 
btarin:; the siimaturcs of a substantial num- 
ber ot students and faculty signed under the 
title of 'The College Comnuinity." I take 
tliis opportunity to respond to that commun- 
ity. 

I agree fully with the request to have a 
procedure established which provides, ia dis- 
ciplinary cases, lor an impartial hearing 
board conipo.sed of representatives from both 
the faculty and the student body. This would 
afford maximum due process in the adjudica- 
tion of individual rights and privileges while, 
at the same time, relieving the Office of 
Student Affairs from the responsibihty of 
serving in both an administrative and an 
adjudicative capacity. 

Consequently, I shall appoint a special com- 
mittee composed of both students and faculty 
to study the matter and to come up with 



a recommendation on how best to institution- 
alize such a system. This committee will 
also have the temporary assijjnment, before 
it is discharged from its duties, of serving 
as the review board in disciplinary actions 
which might arise before the new system 
is finally installed. 

I am pleased to have such direct evidence 
in hand that .students and faculty at Clarion 
State College care about such things. A free 
society rests upon the principle of freedom 
under the law. Thus, when the rules of behav- 
ior are applied in an individual case, freedom 
for the individual can be assured as a mat- 
ter of principle and practice only by the 
use of institution-aligned due process. 

As for the specific case now in my office 
on appeal, a careful evaluation is under way, 
ba.sed upon an established record, which in 
dicates misconduct in violation of College 
rules evidentially and admittedly. This appeal 
has been filed under the procedures existing 
before the case arose and, therefore, is not 
necessarily a reflection upon the original pro- 
cess itself nor upon those who participated 
in it. When the evaluation of the case is 
completed, the student involved will be noti- 
fied in writing. 

JAMES GEMMELL, 

President of Clarion State College 



Variety Show Will Have 
^Something for Everyone^ 



A variety show, scheduled for 8:15 Thurs- 
day evening in the college chapel, has been 
described by one of its directors as having 
"something for everyone" and as being "a 
night to remember." 

Directed by Carl Glass and Cece Carter, 
the variety show will include 19 performers 
in 13 acts. The acts will cover a large range 
of talents: folk music, rock-and-roll, blues, 
jazz, solos of popular songs, several comedy 
acts, and even yodeling. A surprise finale 
will be the highlight of the evening. 

The performers are not only college stu- 



dents, but people from the surrounding area, 
including a group from Knox. Since it is 
being advertised in Brookville, Oil City, Knox, 
and the surrounding area, a large crowd 
is expected. Admission is free and will be 
on a first come, first served basis. 

The variety show is being sponsored by 
Alpha Psi Omega, the National Honorary 
Dramatics Fraternity. Members of the local 
chapter. Alpha Upsilon, make up much of 
the cast and are helping with the arrange- 
ments. 



REVIEW OF FACULTY TRIO 



When Playing is Flawless, 
Musical Order is Clear 



By AATIS E. LILLSTROM 

A»sistuni Professor, Aatlio-Visual Communiratlons 

Listening to music is an endless adventure 
in synchronization. There are so many levels 
of synchronization. There are so many levels 
of adjustment within and between the play- 
ers, within and between the players and the 
musical design, within and between the play- 
ers and the musical design and the listener. 

The musical design is like mvisible draw- 
ings that can only exist in the mind of the 
listener. When the playing is flawless, the 
musical design is clear. When the playing 
falters, the design becomes like water in 
■ glass and water and glass— transparent but 
a distortion or veil of the original conception. 
Anyone can hear all these levels of synchroni- 
zation when they listen, and listen to their 
listening. 

I en.joy listening to the musical conception 
become clear to the point of invisible by 
expert playing; then the composer is design- 
ing with invisible sound across the length 
of my attention. The faculty recital was often 
expertly invisible. I also enjoy it when play- 
ing within and between the players falters 
ever so slightly, when the design comes from 
the invisible into the clarity of water in glass 
and water and glass; the distortions turn 



and stretch the musical design showing how 
cleverly the original design waj fashioned. 

Attention Wanders 

Even those whose attention wanders frim 
listening can notice. Mostly the players notice 
before the other listeners and so, of course, 
they might understand the function of faults 
better. But what they hear is not what we 
in the audience hear and the difference is 
great and so one wonders where the composer 
was listening from when he wrote it. The 
players wonder this at times, many times 
and of course changing thinking about listen- 
ing, changes playing. If one listened one could 
hear the changes as they thought and played 
and listened, and I did and was pleased 
much more than I was disappointed. 

So much of playing is touching and not 
touching and all that is so close to emotion. 
When you listen to the touch, you cannot 
hear the instrument; the intention is louder 
than the abstraction. When you hear the qual- 
ity of the instrument, the playing is excel- 
lently invisible to all but emotion. The fabric 
of emotion is rare only when the pauses 
are weighed as the sounds and when the 
large pattern of the abstraction is the plane 
of attention to which the playing is aimed. 
If one listened, one could hear all of this 
(Continued <m page 2) 




THE CLARION STATE COLLEGE FACULTY TRIO: David Mallory, violin; 
Vahe Berberian, cello; and Robert Van Meter, piano, assisted by Barbara 
Hardin, viola. 





Vol. 40, No. 10 



CLARION STATE COLLEGE — CLARION, PENNSYLVANIA 



Friday, December 13, 19(58 



Student Union Board Members Dr. Gemmell, Owen Winters 

Will Participate in Opening ^jn Make Dedicatory Remarks 

At Union Opening on Monday 




PICTURED ABOVE are the advisor and members of the Student Union 
Board. Starting from the top row (left to right) are Dr. John Nanovsky, 
Ray Lenzi, Tom Paolino, Bill Nanovsky, Marg Butler, Owen Winters, and 
Laurel King. 

CSC Concert Choir and Symphony 
Combine Forces to Present 
Christmas Concert on Monday 



This year's Christmas Concert will feature 
the combined forces of the Clarion State 
College Concert Choir and the Clarion State 
College Symphony Orchestra, under the di- 
rection of William McDonald, in the pre- 
sentation of J. S. Bach's cantata, Lobet Go.t 
and Luigi Cherubini's Requiem Mass in C 
Minor. 

This event, which is open to the publ'C 
with no admission charge, is scheduled f jr 
8 p.m. Monday at the Waldo Tippin Gymna- 
sium. It is dedicated to the memory of Gloria 
Yough, an associate professor of health and 
physical education, who died of a heart attack 
in August. 

The Concert Choir, which is directed by 
William McDonald and which numbers more 
than one hundred voices, has been in rehear- 
sal since the beginning of the academic year 
for this event. The forthcoming concert will 
mack the first appearance of this perform- 



ing organization since the highly successful 
Centennial Convocation Concert on May 1, 
whiih was also presented with the orchestra. 

W'.thi Eiv.ard Roncone as its conductor, the 
Synpnony Orchestra will be making its sec- 
one appjarance of this school year, having 
made its debut on November 6, 1938. Ron- 
cfue has been preparing his instrumentalists 
since that time for the Christmas Concert. 

Both McDonald and Ror.cone thought it 
fitting that this concert be dedicated to the 
memory of Miss Yough. During the years of 
1962-63, Miss Yough was an active partici- 
pant of the Symphony Orchestra an an oboist 
and as an alto with the Concert Choir. It 
is interesting to note here that the choir's 
Easter Concert of 1963 which featured Che- 
rubini's Requiem Mass in C Minor was also 
Miss Yough's last appearance as an active 
member of the Concert Choir. 



Five Clarion Debaters Finish 
High in Three Tournaments 



Five Clarion debaters finished high in the 
standings at three debate tournaments before 
and after the Thanksgiving holidays. 

At Ohio State, Clarion juniors Mary Lou 
McCauliff, and Betti Ferguson, finished in 
a tie for sixth place in a field of 80 teams 
from 16 states. 

At the end of the first five rounds, Clarion 
was one of the five remaining undefeated 
teams in the tournament after defeating 
Bowling Green, Columbia, Indiana Stale, Un- 
iversity of Wisconsin and Northwestern in 
succession. In the final three rounds Clarion 
lost their power-matched round against tlie 
University of Michigan, lost to Miami, and 
defeated the University of South Carolina, 

The 6-2 record for Betti and Mary Lou 
was Clarion's best record of the season for 
major tournament power-matched competi- 
tion, and put Clarion in a tie with University 
ol Michigan, Northwestern, King's, Michigan 
State, Wayne State, Ohio State, Marietta and 
Rutgers. 

Monday and Tuesday before Thanksgiving 
senior Pat Dobson and sophomore Marilyn 
Roslanowick narrowly missed making the el- 
imination rounds at Wake Forest, North Car- 
olina, where they were in competition with 
52 teams for 23 states and the District of 
Columbia. Clarion had a 5-3 record, which 
was good enough to put them in the top 
16 of this power- matched tournament, but 
when the tie was broken on speaker points 
the Clarion debaters were eliminated. 

Pat and Marilyn had victories over Rich- 
mond, Washington and Lee. Bowling Grc?r!, 
Auburn, and Brown, and losses to Noilh- 
western, Midwesi.em, and the returning tour- 
nament champions from University of South 
CaroUna. 



Friday and Saturday before vacation, Mary 
Lou McCauliff and Barry McCauliff tied for 
fir.st place at Duquesne University, where 
they competed with a dozen area colleges 
and McGill University of Canada. Barry and 
Mary Lou had a 4-1 record, with victories 
over Washington and Jefferson, McGill, La- 
Salle, and Fairmont, thus finishing in a first- 
place tie with University of West Virginia, 
University of Pennsylvania, and Otterbein, 
all of whom had 4 1 records. When the tie 
was broken on speaker points, Otterbein and 
West Virginia were selected to debate in 
the final round, which Otterbein won by a 
2-1 decision of the three judges. 



Myers Article Featured 

On pages 4 and 5 of today's is- 
sue, the Call reprints an article 
about communication, participation, 
and democracy on the college cam- 
pus. Equally important, perhaps, 
are the comments on the article by 
seven students and four faculty 
members of Clarion State College. 

Those who find the Myers artic- 
le and the local comments worthy 
of further comment are invited to 
write to the editor. Although the 
Call will not publish its next issue 
until January 13th, those who wish 
to write a letter to the editor are 
urged to submit their letters before 
the start of Christmas vacation, De- 
cember 20. 



Formal opening and dedication ceremon- 
ies renaming the old gymnasium as Har- 
vey Hall Student Union are scheduled (or 
7 p.m. Monday. The informal opening of tlie 
recreation lounge area took place November 
21. 

In a program conducted primarily by the 
Student Union Board, members of which 
represent a variety of campus student organi- 
zations, Board Chairman Owen Winters will 
be joined by President James Gemmell i.i 
making dedicatory remarks. A good number 
of students, including representatives of all 
student organizations, is expected to partici- 
pate. 

Renovated at an approximate cost of $60,- 
000, the old Frank A. Harvey Gymnasium 
has taken on a new look with the main 
gymnasium floor divided into a tastefully 
furnished lounge area, a billiards area con- 
taining eight new tables and a balcony area 
furnished with tables for cards and other 
table games. 

Impetus for completion of the program, 
started eight years ago when a student fund 
was formed for the purpose, came with com 
pletion of the new Waldo S Tippin Gym- 
nasium last spring. Concerted student ef- 
forts for action resulted in a plan to convert 
the old gymnasium, capping five years of 
effort by the Student Union Board founded 



in 1963 as an outgrowth of the Student Sen- 
ate. 

Also renovated was the snack bar on the 
lower level, in existence .since 19l>3 with code 
of conduct rules promulgated largely by the 
student organizations. These basic rules have 
been revised and updated for use in the 
new recreation area 

Also contained in the buiidinj,' are four 
faculty offices, the Clarion Call and Sequelle 
offices, a day students' room lor commuters, 
a .student organization workroom, and a di- 
rector's office. 

Dr. John Nanovsky. Student Union director, 
has recruited a full-timo staff to operate tlie 
facility on a seven day per week basis. lu 
addition to the director and his secretary, 
the staff includes a games-lounge area super- 
visor and several assistants. 

Dr. Nanovsky anticipates a wide range of 
uses for the Student Union including bridge, 
chess and billiards clubs with tournaments 
conducted by various groups on an intra- 
mural basis. 

Limited meeting spa<j^ would also be made 
available on a scheduled basis for student, 
alumni and related organizations as well as 
receptions and teas for distinguished visitors, 
artists, lecturers, and entertainers. 

Plans for the first phase of a new Student 
Center have been approved under the col- 
lege's S40 million expansion program and the 
architect has been selected. 



Clarion Accepts Re-Accreditation for 
Elementary and Secondary Education 



Clarion State has been fully re-accredited 
for elementary and secondary teacher edu- 
cation as a result of 'ast spring's evaluation 
by the National Council for Accreditation of 
Teacher Education, according to an an- 
nouncement by President James Gemmell. 

In a letter to Dr. Gemmell as follow-up 
of the evaluation of the college's teacher 
preparation program conducted last March 
24-27, Dr. Rolf W. Larson, national director 
of NCATE, announced the council's decision 
to grant continued accreditation for a ten- 
year period beginning Sept. 1, 1988. 

Original all-college accreditation by the 
council was granted Sept. 1, 1958. It is one 
of two major accreditations now in effect 
at Clarion State, the other being that of the 
Middle States Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools. 

Reviewed in connection with the basic as- 



pects of the institution were student body 
and student personnel policies, faculty resour- 
ces for teacher education, and phy.'-ical facili- 
ties. Undergraduate programs ol teacher ed- 
ucation were reviewed as to their basic a.s- 
pects, undergraduate curricula, undergrad- 
uate laboratory experietfces and with respect 
to the undergraduate school librarian pro- 
gram. 

Accreditation resulted from favorable re- 
commendations to the national council by 
a nine-member committee on Visitation and 
Appraisal chaired by Dr. Stanton Longwor- 
thy. Dean of Instruction, Glassboro State Col- 
lege, Glassboro, N, J. 

Clarion State College, accredited by the 
Middle States Association since 1948, has in- 
creased its full-time enrollment nearly thre'e 
and one-half times and its faculty .strength 
by nearly five times in the past decade. 



^We Have Always Lived in the Castle ' 
Will be Shown Tonight in Chapel; 
Janice Anderson to be Featured 



The College Readers present We Have Al- 
ways Lived in the Castle written by Shirley 
Jackson at 8:30 p.m. tonight and tomorrow 
night in the college Chapel. 

The story is one of 18-year-old Mary Kath- 
erine Blackwood, affectionately referred to 
as 'Merriecat," who attempts to isolate and 
monopolize the attention of her older sister, 
Constance. 

Members of the cast include Janice Ander- 
son as Merriecat, Roseann Zaremba as Con- 
stance, Ken Miller as Uncle Julian, John 
Solomon as Cousin Charles, Linda Loxterman 



Christmas Program 
Will Be Presented 
By Planetarium 

A Christmas program entitled "The Star 
of Bethlehem" will be presented next week 
by the Clarion State College Planetarium in 
the Donald D. Peirce Science Center. 

Arranged and projected by Jack N. Blaine, 
Director of the Planetarium, the hour-long 
program beginning at 7:30 each evening is 
centered around the explanation of the Star 
of Bethlehem. The planetarium sky will be 
reconstructed as it would have appeared at 
the time of the birth of Christ. 

Admission is free but tickets will be issued 
on a first come, first served basis due to 
limited seating facilities. They may be ob- 
tained at the planetarium or in Room 104, 
D. D. Peirce Science Center, between 9 a.m. 
and 3 p.m. Tickets may be reserved by call- 
ing Extensions 349 or 253. 



as Helen Clarke, Connie Carter as Mrs. 
Wright, Leslie Hudak as Stella, Carl Gaffron 
as Jim. 

Also, Chris Mas.sena, Paul Gaffney, John 
Sandrock, Herb Michaels, Mike Elliott, Jo- 
anne Long, Kathy Barron, Pat Fitzgerald, 
Jerrilyn Jones, Betti Ferguson, Diana Sum- 
merville, Connie Kusiolek. and members of 
speech class 251. 

The production, directed by Dr. Mary Hard- 
wick assisted by Connie Carter, George Hall, 
Carl Glass, John Sandrock, and CeCe Carter, 
promises to be interesting. 

Arsenic, anyone? 




JANICE ANDERSON 



Pane 2 



TTIE CALL -- Clarion State College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



Friday, December 13, 1968 



Editorially 
Speaking 



Otl OU-T- C4.Tn.fU-9' 




Is Clarion 18 Years Behind 
The Times? Many Students 
And Professors Feel it Is 



Every school has problems and 
Clarion is no exception. This fact can 
easily be seen by evaluating the vari- 
ous comments from student and facul- 
ty members in reference to the Alonzo 
Myers article, which is included in this 
issue of the Call. 

In general, the students who com- 
mented on the article seemed to think 
that the student body of Clarion is 
basically apathetic, especially concern- 
ing student government. Many rea- 
sons are cited to explain the why's of 
this situation including a lack of con- 
cern by the faculty, poor communica- 
tion between students and faculty, and 
the effectiveness of Clarion as a "place 
for learning." 

One student felt that he was mis- 
sing something important from his pro- 
fessors — informal and friendly conver- 
sations and concern that would help 
to break down many of the existing 
communication barriers between the 
students and faculty. 

The faculty comments also reveal- 
ed that a communication problem does 
exist on this campus, and they also felt 
that something should be done to help 
remedy the problem. Another factor 
of piimary concern was a need for 



more student participation in the gov- 
erning and organizational activities of 
the college. 

Many interesting and stimulating 
comments were sparked by Professor 
Myers' article. All of those that conj- 
mented felt that the article is pertin- 
ent to Clarion today. One student put 
it this way: "Is it possible that this 
article was written with our college 
especially in mind?" Chances are that 
it, wasn't, but it was no doubt written 
with colleges like Clarion in mind — 
colleges that need to wake up to the 
reality of 1968. The ironical thing 
about the article is that it wasn't writ- 
ten this year or even last year, but 
rather in 1950. Is it possible th.-^t 
Clarion is at least eighteen years be- 
hind the times? Many students and 
faculty members feel that it is. 

An opportunity is being offered to 
everyone to make their own decisions 
about the Myers article and about the 
comments. This article deserves care- 
ful consideration by both students, fac- 
ulty members, and administrators. Mr, 
Myers has a great deal to say to Clar- 
ion. The question is: Are we willing 
to listen? 

— C. W. 




OPINION POLL 



Would You Approve or Would 
You Disapprove a Pass-Fail 
System at Clarion State College 



By ROSEMARY SLEBODNIK 



« -4 !■--* 



Students Should Be Praised 
On Behavior in New Lounge 



The students of Clarion State Col- 
lege can now breathe a sigh of relief. 
We now have use of the long-awaited 
student lounge. 

Plans for the lounge were an- 
nounced last spring, and anticipation 
of the oncning began to mount. Orig- 
inallv. the opening was scheduled for 
October 12, but because of numerous 
delays, the opening was postponed. The 
ooening was Thursday, November 22, 
without any fanfare or formal cere- 
mony. 

The student body should be com- 
mended upon their behavior in their 
lounge, '.'hey arc acting as mature 
ar^uILs. ind thev deserve recognition 
for this. Mr. Cecil Cox, the night ac- 



tivities supervisor, was quoted as say- 
ing that "the behavior was exception- 
ally good." 

The uniqueness of this lounge will 
eventually wear away as time passes, 
but it is hoped that the amount of en- 
thusiasm that is now being displayed 
will not die. Nor do we hope that a 
lackadaisical attitude towards the 
lounge will develop. For the lounge 
to remain in its present condition, the 
students must continue in their pres- 
ent mode of behavior. We hope that 
it will, and that the students continue 

to enjoy the facilities that are now be- 
ing offered for their enjoyment. 

— S. D. 



With the Christmas season fast approaching and 
everyone makinf/ plans for their holiday vacations, 
the staff of the Clarion CALL would like to wish ev- 
eryone a joyous Christmas and a happy New Year, 



r 



The Clarion Call 



CAIX Office, Room 7, Harvey Uall 
Clarion Stale College^ Clarion, Penna. 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Carolyn Welesko 

BUSINESS MANAGER Tom Smith 

NEWS EDITOR Sandy Diesel 

FEATURE EDITOR Sue Fair 

COPY EDITOR Rosemary Slebodnik 

EXCHANGE EDITOR Peg Foley 

CO SPORTS EDITORS Dennis Morrow, Gary .Andres 

CIRCTTLATTON MANAGER Pam Rider 

STAFF MEMBERS Elizabeth Curley, Margaret Beierle, 

Ann Rohrbaugh, Ed Wozniak, Gary Daiirora. Larry Carter, 
Georgana Winters. Linda Sonnenfeld, Owen Winters. Dianna 
Cherry. Larilyn Andre, Dick Mears, Bob Toth. Jerry Zary, 
Nancy Sarginger. Judy Summy, Linda Pifer. Kathy .lones 
ADVISOR Richard K. Redfern 



PNPA< 



PEIRSTlVAinA 

imrsPAPEK 

PaBLISBBRC 
AfiSOGUTiOl 



Many Clarion State College students are 
dissatisfied lor one reason or another, with 
the traditional letter grade system such as 
the one presently employed at this college. 

Perhaps a new type of grading system 
should be put into use; one which will put 
less emphasis on the grade the student earns, 
, ^d more emphasis on the material the stu- 
dent can assimilate. This was the question 
posed to our students this week: "Would 
you approve or disapprove of a Pass-Fail 
grading system at Clarion?" 

Dan Speal: "I think cur present system 
of grading is unfair to the student because 
it is forced upon him throughout his academic 
years beginning with grade school. It forces 
students to become more concerned with the 
letter grade than with the content of the 
course. 1 believe that if the Pass-Fail system 
would be incorporated into the academic in- 
stitutions, the students would benefit more 
from instructors and textbooks, since they 
would not be fearful of the 'almighty' grade." 

Bill Jones: "I disapprove. It doesn't give 
a student a chance if he is a borderline 
case. It doesn't really tell how much you 
know— it just shov/s you know enough to pass. 
How will they know who to choose lor grad 
school or business positions?" 

Jim Gallucci: "I'm for it— then there would 
be less emphasis on tests. That and no cut 
system would be great." 

Sandy Siviy: "I disapprove because it 
would only benefit the students who don't 
care about school and are here just to put 
in their four years of college. We are sup- 
posed to learn for learning's sake— but who 
does that? Competition is a natural element 
of human nature; therefore, competition in 
grades can not be eliminated." 

Larry Brooke: "I approve. I think q.p.a. 
is an unfair way to measure one's accom- 
plishments. The low q.p.a. may keep you 
out of grad school. So, even though you may 
be excellent in your own field, you may 
be kept from furthering your education." 

Gary Yazwa: "I don't approve. People who 
do better work should receive better grades. 
Why should someone who does C work get 
the same grade as someone who does 'A' 
work?" 

Candy James: "I approve. The idea of 
college is to learn. But students are too pre- 
occupied with getting a grade to please their 
parents. This way they could learn without 
pressure. Right now college is like a grad- 
uated high school. Something should be done 
so that it is really 'Higher Learning'." 

Buddy Martin: "I don't approve because 
grades reflect how much you have learned. 
But I think the grading system could change 
—more emphasis on class participation and 
class involvement." 

Charlie Matsko: "I'm in favor of it. First, 
this eliminates a pressure on the student 
as far as grades. Too much emphasis on 
grades stifles learning. Secondly, by having 
a Pass-Fail system, a student can devote 
more time to working at his own level rather 
than at the level of someone else in his 
class Thirti; the grading system in any ed- 
ucational system is outdated — there is no real 
way to assess a student's learning capacity. 
Seme .students making As may not be work- 
ing to capacity, while others getting C's are 
working to capacity. Such a grading system 
seems to forget individual differences," 

Ken Miller: 'By giving letter grades, stu- 
dents are motivated; while a Pass-Fail grade 
lea\es the student with an attitude of 'Oh 
well, I passed." On the other hand, it may 
reduce the anxiety to get grades, causing 



more motivation. I think it all depends on 
the type of student at the school." 

Pat Losik; "I approve of the system be- 
cause it's been working successfully at other 
schools. I think everyone would learn more 
and work harder because there wouldn't be 
such an emphasis on grades." 

Sharon Cariss: "I approve, I think you 
should be able to take some courses like 
this, but not all. This way students will take 
courses because they interest them. They 
won't be afraid to take them because they 
are difficult." 

Sandy Brody: "I'd approve. Even if you 
get a C. you sometimes work harder than 
other students. When you sign a teaching 
contract, many schools do not worry about 
grades so long as you have at least C's." 

Andy Conway: "I'd approve. This type of 
system might eliminate some of the inherent 
disadvantages of the present system in that 
it will reduce the competitive basis uoon 
which our academic world is founded. Per- 
haps tliis system would work best in ad- 
vanced courses, which serious students will 
approach with an attitude worthy of the re- 
sponsibility that a Pass-Fail system de- 
mands." 

Several schools have already begun using 
this system. The University of California at 
Santa Cruz, which will have its first grad- 
uating class this spring, has always operated 
on the Pass-Fail basis for all courses. Lock 
Haven State College has instituted a partial 
Pass-Fail system. Students are permitted to 
choose one course each semester (outside 
the requirements for his major) on a Pass- 
Fail basis. 

At a school using strictly the Pass-Fail 
system, a student's "grades" would be 
backed by a class standing or personal eval- 
uation by his professors. Administrators claim 
that the use of such a system does not affect 
a student's chances for admittance to grad- 
uate school. University of California at Santa 
Cruz students have been accepted by such 
schools as Harvard Law School, Oxford, and 
University of Chicago. 

The philosophy underlying the program is 
student exploration into new ideas. If such 
a system was instituted at Clarion, many 
students may be motivated to take courses 
they had previously felt were outside their 
scope. For some it may mean a relaxing 
of pressure on grades, making study ea.sier 
for them; while for others it may mean 
the discovery of a previously unthought of 
career. 

Two One- Act Play 
Groups to Be Presented 

Continuing in their presentation of studio 
productions, the directing and acting classes 
will present two groups of onf^-act plays next 
Tuesday and Wednesday evenings. 

Tuesday, four plays will be performed: An- 
ton Chekov's "The Anniversary," directed 
by Judy Cross; the inquisition scene from 
George Bernard Shaw's "Saint Joan," direct- 
ed by Jan Garda: "Time is a Thief," directed 
by John Solomon: and "The Clod," directed 
by John Dorish. 

The next ni.qht Herb Michaels will direct 
Bcrlolt Brechts' "The Elephants Calf"; Paul 
Armbruster will direct Edna St. Vincent Mil- 
lay's "Aria de Capo"; and John Sandrock 
will direct Dorothy Parker's "Here We Are." 
Watch the daily builetin for curtain times. 



PLA Y REVIEW 



Irwin Shawns 'Bury the Dead^ 
Fails in Script and Execution 



By GARY DAURORA 

This is the year of the UN-Clarion. Events 
this semester have shown there has been 
a change. Events that were definitely not 
or UN-Clarion. For the first time in three 
years here: the newspaper is delving into 
controversial areas and getting results; meet- 
ings are being attended by enthralling crowds 
greater than five; fraternities and sororities 
are sponsoring and doing things for the en- 
tire campus; 'art' films are being shown 
and people are going who aren't even re- 
quired to go; things (like last month's Sitar 
concert and "Biedermann and the Firebugs") 
are being held in the Chapel which fill it 
beyond capacity. 

Last week's production of Irwin Shaw's 
"Bury the Dead" promised to continue in 
this tradition of UN-Clarion, but it failed. 
It failed not so much in intention as in exe- 
cution. 

Its promise lays in its contemporary contro- 
versial anti-war theme, something unseen on 
this campus since Fall '66's "Sergeant Mus- 
grave's Dance." Unfortunately, since it was 
written by Irwin and not George Bernard 
Shaw it lacked the wit and cunning so neces- 
sary for the theme: thus, its failure rests 
as much with the script as with the perform- 
ers. \ 

The play dealt with six soldiers who die 
in "any war" at "any time" in "any place," 
who stand in their communal grave and re- 
fuse to "^c buried. Each of these is a stocK 
character who feels personally cheated of 
something by the war: the farmer of his 
making things grow ("my place is above 
the sod, not under it"); the rogue, the lover 
of flesh, of his future loves ("I only want 
ju.st to watch them"); the poet or dreamer 
of his uncompleted starts '::so many books 
unread . . , pages unwritten"); the worker 
of a second chance with his wife ("why didn't 
I say anything before"); the youth of his 
manhood ( "I never had a woman ... I spent 



20 years practising to be a man"); the loner 
of his glory ("At last I had something to 
say ... 1 was the first one to stand"). 

Though not particularly original, these re- 
velations could have been presented in a 
less agonizing manner, but the author chose 
to tell them in long trite speeches. This trite- 
ness and absurdity spread to the rest of 
the characters: the graying West Point Gen- 
eral who speaks in cliches ("I order you 
to lie down and be buried"), the editor who 
first ignored then printed the story ("Even 
dead our boys reiuse to rest until we win"), 
and the priest who prays for victory ("With 
God en our side"). The only thing the author 
didn't do was give the reason why ("Maybe 
the ground got too tired or too lull , . . can't 
say for sure"). This play undoubtedly reads 
better than it plays; the director should have 
realized this and adjusted the script. 

Last week's performance was perfect for 
a dress rehearsal. The over-all impression 
was one of loud and slow. It was readily 
apparent that the actors were not adequate- 
ly prepared; although familiar with their 
lines, they appeared lost on stage. This plus 
the script caused the play to slow to prac- 
tically a standstill. The 'loud' came from 
the graphically realistic sights and sounds 
of battle and death. However, the time be- 
tween the 'loud' was stretched so far beyond 
reality by the 'slow' that the 'loud' served 
only to jar one awake. 

Generally, the actors were adequate for 
their roles. Outstanding were Steve Brezzo 
as the graying West Point General and Kathy 
Barron as the worker's $18.50-a-week wife. 

Although it was a sincere attempt at UN- 
Clarion, it failed. It could have been saved 
had director Cortez Puryear had more time 
and had he done some drastic cutting. Though 
it failed one can only hope more and more 
attempts will be made, and that tliis year 
will mark the beginning of the UN-Clarion 
era. 



Dean Moore In Interview 
Speaks of Clarion 's Growth 



By MARK SILVIS 

As a member 6f the journalism cla.ss, I 
recently had an opportunity to interview Dean 
James D. Moore, the Clarion State dean of 
academic affairs. 

Since I had never met him before, and 
therefore knew little about him, I was a 
little nervous. However, he immediately set 
us at ease as we entered his office by of- 
fering his hand and greeting us with a plea- 
sant smile. I was deeply impressed with his 
personality, his speaking ability, his appear- 
ance, and his informality in letting five stu- 
dents interview him. 

He began the interview by giving us a 
brief summary of his work at Clarion State 
and of the growth of the college during that 
time. He first came to Clarion in 1943 as 
an instructor in a United States Air Force 
program at the college. He left Clarion at 
the end of that academic year, but returned 
in 1946 at the request of Dr. Paul G. Chandler, 
who was then president. Dean Moore ac- 
cepted the position of dean of instruction, 
a position which has been renamed dean 
of academic affairs, and he also taught math 
until 1956. 

Administrators Should Teach 

His chief regret at giving up teaching is 
the "lack of contact with very many students, 
except tho.se with problems," He feels that 
it is "advisable for administrators to have 
a clasis of two" in order to keep in contact 
with the students. 

In discussing the growth of Clarion State 
he stated that there were 129 Clarion students 
(including only five men) and 350 Air Force 
men at this school in 1943. When he returned 
in 1946, there were 571 Clarion students and 
111 Penn State students. From 194S to 1951, 
Penn State was unable to keep all the fresh- 
men who had been accepted and therefore 
"farmed" them out to the state colleges. 
In 1953 the college hit a low point of 412 
.students. In 1963, the enrollment was 2,161, 
and this year the enrollment is 3,210. Dean 
Moore also noted the growth of the faculty 
from 36 in 1945, to 38 in 1953, to 45 in 1959, 
to 123 in 1964, to 270 this year. 

When asked about the duties which his 
job entailed. Dean Moore stated that it dealt 
directly with faculty recruiting and orienta- 
tion, with the curriculum, and with the keep- 
ing of student records. He stated that his 
job required his attendance at several con- 
ventions, but he confessed that he was "not 
a convention goer," However, he "regularly" 
attends meetings of the academic deans of 
the state colleges and "frequently" attends 
the meetings of the academic deans of all 
the colleges in the state. He noted that he 
is one of the few academic deans of all 
the colleges in the state who does not have 
a doctor's degree. 

Students Get Answers 

He stressed the point that his office and 
all the other deans' offices are always open 
to any student and that the student will al- 
ways receive an answer. He added with a 
smile. "It may not be the answer the stu- 
dent wants to hear, but it will be an answer," 

When asked to compare the students today 
with those of the past, he noted the big 




DEAN MOORE 

difference was that the students today are 
"better prepared." The high schools from 
which the present students corns have broad- 
er and more advanced curriculums than those 
of yesteryear. Dean Moore also believes that 
the competition among students is greater 
today. 

He feels that the "students arc generally 
still in colege to get a good education." 
He commends the students at Clarion because 
they "have little student unrest." 

Dean Moore recalls that one of his friends 
advised him many years a jo to "stay in 
teaching and out of administration." He is 
"not unhappy" that ho didn't follow his 
friend's advice. "Retirement looks inviting," 
but he finds his job "very rewarding," and 
he added sincerely, "I like it here." 

Review of Faculty Trio 

(Continued from page 1) 

at the recital, this, and many subtle varia- 
tions of this. 

Fault of Audience? 

The excellent piaymg iiaiicred mostly by 
inattention to the larger patterns of the com- 
position, but this may have mainly been the 
fault of the audience. The pieces chosen and 
outlined with excellent scholarship and de- 
scription were played to emphasize similar- 
ities. I was puzzled to hear such different 
personalities cast into similar garb. The in- 
terpretation seems accurate from their cen- 
tury but not from ours. The difference is 
not a fault, just an expectation. 

But then if one listened, one could hear 
that Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven were at 
times being heard by everyone by way of 
other composers nearer to us and that 
changed everything briefly, audibly. It is very 
hard to hear back in another century with 
the excitement after you have heard what 
has grown from them, because of them. 
These recitals bring so much for us to con- 
sider in continuous listenms^ to what we can 
be hearing of their playing, and so it is 
all very satisfying. 

The program: Piano Trio in C Major (c. 
1795), Haydn: Piano Quartet in G Minor. K. 
478 (1785), Mozart: Piano Trio in C Minor, 
Opus 1, No. 3 (1792), Beethoven. 



Friday, December 13, 1968 



THE CALL — Clarion Stale College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



Page 3 



Focus on Venaiigo Campus 



Senate Appoints New Members; VC Shuttle Bus Formal Planned; 

Committees Organize Events 



There has been much activity in the Stu- 
dent Senate lately at Venango, Changes, id- 
eas, and plans are just some of the recent 
actions. 

Stephen Appointed 

Sophomore Barbara Stephen was recently 
appointed to the Venango Campus Student 
Senate by President Barbara McNutt. Barb 
will serve as the fifth .sophomore representa- 
tive and will be the chairman of the Student 
Union Committee. Barb is replacing John 
Wilizowski. 

Student Organizations Committee 

One of the committees under the Venango 
Campus Student Senate is the Student Organi- 
zations Committee. Headed by Susan Kagle, 
the committee is responsible for reporting 
to the Senate any new activities or organiza- 
tions which begin at Venango Campus. This 
committee must also maintain a budget for 
all organizations and groups, including the 
Campus Players, the Philosophes, and the 
Venango Campus Publicity Committee. Pre- 
sently under consideration of the committee 
is a campus chess tournament, which will 
probably become a reality in several weeks. 

The members of the Student Organizations 
Committee are Harry Hont, Lorraine Kapan- 
ak, Judy Smith, and Regina Wilson. With 
Mr, Crawford of the History Department and 
Mr. Jeschke of the English Department as 
advisors, the committee is hoping for a ver 
successful year. 

Cultural Committee 

The Cultural Committee, a sub-committee 
of the Student Senate, is formed to promote 
a cultural interest in the Students at Venango 
Campus. 

Headed by chairman Barbara Winkler, the 
committee consists of Jean Ackerman, Harry 
Buhay, Rosie Downs, Sandy Martin, Diana 
Ozmik and Charlie Sigel. 

The main purpose of the committee is to 



choose movies for showing every Sunday 
night, to schedule any cultural events which 
may be of interest to students and to publi- 
cize any Clarion or Oil City community pro- 
ductions, including concerts, plays, movies, 
or lectures. 

AtCiletic Committee 

Athletics is not a forgotten activity at Ven- 
ango Campus. The students at Venango sup- 
port three athletic teams, the Venango Cam- 
pus golf and basketball teams, and the foot- 
ball team at main campus. All of this is 
made possible by Venango's Athletic Com- 
mittee. 

The 1968-69 Athletic Committee is under 
the supervision of faculty-advisor, Mr. Glenn 
McElhatten. Since it is a function of the 
Venango Campus Student Senate, Thomas 
Pleiffer, a student senator, was named chair- 
man of the Athletic Committee. The commit- 
tee is made up of four members, Mike Lin- 
dow, Chris Kistler, Larry Amos, and Rich 
Yonkofski. The committee works very hard 
to keep an athletic spirit circulating through- 
out Venango Campus. 

Many people feel that the purpose of the 
Athletic Committee is merely to charter bus- 
es and purchase tickets for athletic events, 
but their duties are far wider than this. Each 
year the Student Senate allots a budget to 
the Athletic Committee. Ttiese funds must 
be strictly managed throughout the entire 
academic year. Tom Pfeiffer and Mr. McEl- 
hatten have now completed the task of setting 
up the first semester budget. The cost of 
tickets and buses do take up a major portion 
of this budget, but other needs must also 
be taken care of. Some of these are referees, 
gym facilities, equipment, uniforms, and 
meals for all team members and cheerlead- 
ers. The aim of this year's Athletic Commit- 
tee is to arouse more interest among the 
students in support of their teams. As an 
incentive, transportation will be provided, 
hopefully, for all games. 



Program Again 
Provides Scrvic*e 



The Venango Campus shuttle bus program 
was initiated last fall by the 1967-G8 Student 
Senate, This program, which has been con- 
tinued this year, provides campus stu- 
dents with transportation to and from strate- 
gic points in Oil City on Friday nights. 

This year the student's shuttle bus service 
is in effect most Friday evenings from 7 
p,m, to midpight. Hourly stops are made at 
the campus, on the south side at the Latonia 
Movie Theatre, and on the north side at the 
Holiday Inn and YMCA, This service pro- 
vides students with transportation to special 
campus activities scheduled for Friday 
nights, such as plays, concerts and dances. 

The students can also use the shuttle bus 
to take advantage of a new activity which 
is now being formulated for Venango Cam- 
pus, The local YMCA of Oil City is accept- 
ing membership from the students of Venan- 
go Campus, The fee for boys is $12 a year 
and $10 a year for girls. The full fee is not 
required upon enrollment but should be paid 
over a 90-day period. If a minimum of 40 
students from the campus are enrolled, a 
campus night may be held every Friday with 
only students using all of the facilities. 

Amcng the facilities are a swimming pool, 
basketball courts, pool and ping-pong tables, 
a weight room and indoor track. Girls may 
use the pool every Monday, Wednesday, and 
Friday nights. The YMCA membership should 
be good everywhere, but all students should 
have a membership. Those interested should 
see Mr. James Brenot at the YMCA. 

Many students have taken and will take 
full advantage of both activities, the shuttle 
bus and the YMCA. These students are very 
grateful for these activities and hope that 
there will be more activities in the future. 



' 



Cheerleaders Chosen for Season 
ExperiencecT Squad to Perform 



Venango Campus cheerleaders for the 19- 
68-69 basketball season have been chosen. 
This year's squad consists of Janet Dodd, 
Sue Kagle, Claudia Kramer, Kathy Prince, 
Kathy Squire, Barb Stephen and Jill Wag- 
ner. 

Janet Dodd is a freshman at 'Venango 
Campus and lives in Oil City. She was grad- 
uated from Cranberry Area High School 
w here she was a cheerleader for three years, 
a member of the yearbook staff and Future 
Leaders of America. Presently, she is major- 
ing in Elementary Education. 

Sue Kagle also was graduated from Cran- 
berry High School and lives in Seneca. In 
high school she was a cheerleader for two 
years, and a member of the Thespians and 
yearbook staff. At Venango she is a member 
of the Student Senate and Secretary-Treas- 
urer of the Philosophes. She is majoring in 
Liberal Arts with a concentration in the 
Social Sciences. 

Claudia Kramer comes from Scott Town- 



ship and was graduated from Canevin High 
School. While in high school she was a mem- 
ber of the drill team, school newspaper, 
French Club, and captain of the girls' varsity 
basketball team. Presently she is a member 
of the House Council at Montgomery Hall. 
She is majoring in Liberal Arts with a con- 
centration in Humanities. So far her plans 
for the future are undecided. 

Kathy Prince is a freshman at Venango 
and lives in Beaver. Kathy was graduated 
from Western Beaver High School where she 
was a majorette, a member of the band, 
Spanish Club, Girls' Athletic Association and 
National Honor Society. Kathy is majoring 
in Spanish and plans to teach in high school. 

Kathy Squire comes to Venango from New 
Cumberland. She was graduated from Red 
Land High School where she was a cheer- 
leader for three years, a member of the 
Thespians and Student Ck)uncil. Kathy is ma- 
joring in Liberal Arts with a concentration 
in Drama. She recently had a lead in a 



V. C. Thespians Present One-Acts; 
Anton Chekov's Plays Highlighted 



play held at the Campus and she plans to 
be an actress. 

Barb Stephen is a sophomore at Venango 
where she is majoring in Secondary Educa- 
tion and hopes to teach senior English, in 
high school. Barb lives in Mount Pleasant 
and was graduated from Mount Pleasant 
Area High School where she was active on 
the newspaper, in the German Club and 
Library Club. At Venango she is a member 
of Student Senate and a clerk at the dorm. 

Jill Wagner was graduated from Hemp- 
field Area High School and lives in Greens- 
burg. In high school she was a majorette, 
as.sistant drum major, a member of the 
Nurses' Club, Honor Band, Swingphonic Band, 
and Madrigals. Jill is in Elementary Edu- 
cation and plans to teach fifth and sixth 
grades. Presently, she is the Secretary of 
the Freshman Class at Venango. 

Mrs. Louise Mushrush is this year's faculty 
advisor, and the student advisor is Linda 
Bogovich. 



Pike County was named after Colonel Ze- 
bulon M. Pike, a hero of the War of 1812. 

The first magazine in America was pub- 
lished in Philadelphia in 1741. 



Students Prepare 

"rtie students of Venango Campus are com- 
pleting the plans for an exciting Christmas 
weekend starting today. Some of the planned 
activities are a semi-formal, a community 
concert, an open house and party, a choir 
recital and a ba.sketball game. 

Semi-Formal 

Plans have already been completed for the 
yuletide semi-formal to be held tomorrow 
evening at the Venango Country Club from 
nine to one o'clock. Music will be provided 
by the Quadsmen, a popular dance band. 
The Country Club will be seasonally decor- 
ated with holiday trimmings. This festivity 
has been planned by the Student Senate So- 
cial Committee, headed by Dorothy Mackey, 
a Venango sophomore. 

Community Concert 

Also on Saturday evening, Venango stu- 
dents will have the opportunity to attend 
a bass baritone concert by Mr. Raymond 
Michalski, a nationally known singer, in the 
new Franklin High School in Franklin, Penn- 
sylvania. This concert is being sponsored by 
the Venango Community Concert Association 
and is the second in a series of four. Trans- 
portation to Franklin will be provided for 
those students interested in hearing Mr. Mi- 
chalski's recital. 

Campus Choir Concerts 

The Venango campus choir, under the di- 
rection of Mr. Larry Landis of the music 
department, has scheduled three concerts for 
the Christmas .season. 

On Monday, Dec. 9, the choir performed 
at the Oil City YMCA for the Rotary Club 
of Oil City. The second of these recitals will 
be presented Monday for the Venango Asso- 
ciation for the Blind at the Belle Lettres 
Club of Oil City. The final concert is to 
be held Wednesday in the Venango Student 
Union for the pleasure of the students. 

The choir plans to sing the familiar "Carol 
of the Bells," "While by My Sheep," and 
"Cantate Domino," among others. For the 
student concert, a number of favorite carols 
will be included for audience participation. 

Open House and Party 

Following these events, residents of Mont- 
gomery Hall are planning a Qiristmas open 
house from one to five to be held Sunday and 
party from seven-thirty to eleven-tiiiny. 

The house council and social committee 
of the dormitory, under the direction of sopho- 
more Judy Wilson, have been active in plan- 
ning both events. Members of both commit- 
tees have been decorating the lobby with 
seasonal trimmings. The large windows of 
the lobby are to be painted with the color- 
ful cartoon characters of "Peanuts" depicting 
Christmas. 

The walls of the lobby wUl be decorated 
with a nativity scene of geometric figures 
constructed by Gary Hennon, a Venango 
freshman. To add more of a holiday spirit, 
a live Christmas tree will be placed in the 
lobby. 

Most of the residents of the dormitory are 
expected to decorate their doors and rooms 
with holiday greetings in hoi>es of receiving 
the prize for the most original or unusual 
decorating theme. 

Basketball Game 

Then, to complete this weekend of activi- 
ties, the V^enango Campus Vulcan basketball 
team will trave' to Warren, Pa., to meet 
Edinboro's Warren Campus team on Monday, 
Dec. 16. This will surely be a thrilling game 
to follow the December 7 match with Edin- 
boro Shenango Campus. 



The Campus Players of Venango Campus 
successfully presented three one-act plays by 
Anton Chekov, The Anniversary, The Wed- 
ding.and The Bear, on Friday, Nov. 22, 
and Saturday, Nov. 23, in the Venango Chris- 
tian High School auditorium. 

The Wedding is one of Chekov's more 
hilarious one-act plays. As the guests anxious- 
ly await the arrival of a general, a state 
of comical confusion is created in the second- 
class restaurant where the bride and groom 
are being feted. The guests include a sailor 
in the voluntary navy; a midwife with delu- 
sions about her musical ability; the bumbling 
telegraph clerk who keeps begging the mid- 
wife to sing; and a Greek shopkeeper who 
insistenUy repeats, "In Greece dere is every- 
ding." But when the general finally arrives, 
he turns out to be less than an asset and 
he only causes more confusion. 

The cast of The Wedding included Mark 
Stevenson as Yevdokim Zhigalov, the father 
of the bride; Mrs. Barbara AuseJ as Natas- 
ya, the mother of the bride; Lorraine Kapan- 
ak as Dashenka, the bride; Dave Reitz as 
Aplombov, the groom; Richard Martyna as 
General Revunov-Karaluv; Mark Hale as Ny- 
unin; Linda Bogovich as midwife Anna Zme- 
yukin; Harry Buhay, as clerk Yat; Lynn 
Shuler as Dymba; Gary Hennon as Dmitry 
Mozgovoy; Bemie Wolf as the best man; 
and Andrea Accardi and Cindy Facciolo as 
the waitresses. The Wedding was produced 
by Arnold Jeschke. 

In addition to The Wedding, the Campus 
Players presented Chekov's The Anniversary, 
an equally comical play. On tne 13th anni- 
versary of the N— Mutual Credit Bank, as 



the employees are preparing for the arrival 
of the deputation from the shareholders, the 
two women actors enter only to hinder the 
employees, and waste time. The chairman's 
wife tries, even though no one listens to 
her, to explain her journey and visit with 
her mother, while an old woman tries to 
get the money that was taken out of her 
husband's paycheck. The tension of the em- 
ployees finally builds up to a wild chase 
around the bank. 

TTie cast of The Anniversary included Sam 
Busco as Audrey Shiputchin, a fat pompous 
man who is chairman of the Board; Mary 
Louise Byers as Tatyana, his flirting wife; 
Chris Graeff as Hirin, the old bank cashier; 
Sue Boyles as Madame Mertchukin, the old 
woman; and Dave Reitz, Larry Norris, and 
Terri Aiken as the shareholders. Carol Proc- 
tor was the student director of The Anniver- 
sary. 

Finally, the players presented Chekov's TTie 
Bear, a pleasing love story. A beautiful young 
widow has been mourning for a year the 
death of her unfaithful husband. Her maid 
tries, to no avail, to convince the young lady 
that she is wasting her time and life. But 
when a handsome young man comes to collect 
the money that the widow's husband owed 
him, a love affair is kindled. ITie sharp con- 
trast of the man's persistence and the wi- 
dow's stubbornness provides an unusual sto- 
ry. Finally, the beautiful widow and the caller 
realize that they should be married. 

The three plays were presented with a 
modem black and white unit setting with 
black cubes as furniture. 




1^ WtllU T 1 



jiit\.ick 



THE WEL^*.\u: Front row, left to right— i»aixj 
Bogovich, Cindy Facciolo, Ancjrea Accardi, and Bernard Wolf. 
Second row — Mark Stevenson, Barbara Ausel, Dave Reitz, Lor- 
aine Kapanak, Lynn Shuler, Richard Martyna, Mark Hale, and 
Gary Hennon. 




THE BEAR: Left to right — Melinda Martin, Gary Miller, and 
Kathy Squire. 



Scholarship Fund is Established 
For Lee Bleustein^ Former Instructor 
And Victim of Auto Accident 



Friends, faculty members, and former stu- 
dents of Venango Campus have set up a 
memorial scholarship fund in memory of 
Lee Bleustein, a former instructor of English 
at Venango Campus. The fund will enable 
worthy students to receive financial aid for 
their college education. Recipients of the 
fund will be selected by a board made up 
of Venango Campus faculty members and 
officials of the Northwest Pennsylvania Bank 
and Trust Company, South Side Branch, of 
Oil City. Candidates will be considered on 
the basis of intellectual potential and finan- 
cial need. 

While at Venango Campus, Mr. Bleustein 
served as an English instructor, advisor to 



the Red Masquers, the campus drama group, 
and personal advisor to many students. Un- 
der his direction the students presented four 
plays: No Exit, A View From the Bridge, 
Macbird, and Bus Stop. 

On June 27, 1968, Lee Bleustein was killed 
in an automobile accident. With Mr. Bleu- 
stein's death, an individual of great potential 
was lost. Memories of Mr. Bleustein will 
remain in the minds of those who knew 
him for many years to come. 

Contributions in memory of Mr. Bleustein 
may be made to the Lee Bleustein Memor- 
ial Scholarship Fund of the Northwest Penn- 
sylvania Bank and Trust Company, South 
Side Branch, of Oil City, Pennsylvania. 



F. C Basketball Team is Chosen; 
Good Season is Anticipated 



The Venango Campus basketball team has 
just completed its first few weeks of hard 
training at Lincoln Junior High School. Coach 
Vincent Curran wUl again lead this inspired 
squad through the 1968-69 season. The mem- 
bers, of this team have already displayed 
a -desire to win and are a cinch to improve 
upon last year's 8-6 mark. 

Ten freshmen and one sophomore make 
up this year's roster. 

Pat Hogan is a 5' 11", 145-pound freshman 
from Syracuse, New York. He attended 
Jamesville Dewitt High School where he par- 
ticipated in basketball, soccer and baseball. 
"Syracuse" is a business major at Venango. 

Pat Casey is 6' 0" tall and weighs 145 
poimds and makes his home in Penn Hills, 
Pa. "Hobbit" is a graduate of St. Vincent 
Prep where he was active in basketball, 
track, and soccer. Pat is a freshman at Ven- 
ango and his major field of study is account- 
ing. 

George Vano is the team's only sophomore. 
He is a 6' 2" southpaw and weighs 187 pounds. 
George is from MunhaU, Pa., and is a grad- 
uate of MunhaU High School. George's major 
field of study is speech. He is also a Re- 
sident Assistant of Montgomery Hall at Ven- 
ango. 

Fred PederzoUi is a secondary education 
major from East Brady, Pa. Fred attended 
East Brady High School where he played 
on the golf team. He was also a member 
of their Western Regional Champion basket- 
ball team. Fred is also a freshman, standing 
6' 0" tall and weighing 175 pounds. 

Tom Pfieffer is an economics major from 
Aliquippa, Pa. He graduated from Rochester 
High School v,'here he was a member of 
the golf team. Tom is 6' 1" tall and weighs 
165 pounds. He is a freshman student sena- 
tor and head of the athletic committee at 
Venango. 

Mike Lindow is a 6' 1", 170-pound freshman 
fh)ln West View, Pa. "Lud" attended North 
Catholic High School where he participated 
in football, track, and golf. He is an English 
major at Venango and is currently an active 
member of the athletic committee and the 
newspaper staff. 

Bill McKenzie is the team's tallest ball- 
player at 6' 3" and he weighs 185 pounds. 
He is a Liberal Arts major from Monaca, 
Pa. Bill is a graduate of Center High School 
where he participated in inter-scholastic golf. 
He is currently a freshman at Venango. 

Ted Pappas is a freshman from Butler, 
Pa. He is 5' 9" tall and weighs 165 pounds. 
Ted played baseball at his alma mater, But- 
ler High School. He is a social science ma- 
jor at Venango. Ted is also a member of 
Venango's House Council. 

Tom Anderson is a 5' 11" freshman from 
Meadville, Pa. His activities at Meadville 
High SchotA included volleyball and football. 
Tom's nipjor field of study at Venango is 
Liberal Arts. 

Dave Stacey is a freshman from the South 
ade of Pittsburgh. He attended South Hills 
School. 0ave is 5" 10" tall and weighs 140 



pounds. He is currently enrolled in the field 
of social science at Venango. 

Bob Wauzzinski is a 5' 11", 190-pound fresh- 
man from Hickory, Pa. At Hickory High 
School, "Animal" was active in football, 
track, and baseball. Bob is a social science 
major and member of Venango's choir. 

This year's team is not a big one, but 
wherever they lack height, they make up 
for it in speed and hustle. A big characteris- 
tic of the team is their unselfish play. All 
of the players have played together now for 
some time and have learned to work as 
a unit. Coach Cmran has had them playing 
a stiff man-to-man defense at every practice 
session. All of the boys have been putting 
out 100 percent because they are all seeking 
berths on the startmg five. 

Members of the squad are keeping in mind 
the big game against Clarion's JV's on Feb. 
4. This year's schedule is not conaplete as 
yet, but it will again include branch cam- 
puses of the colleges. 

REMAINING 1968-69 SCHEDULE 

Dec. 14— at Warren Campus 
Jan. 8— at Shenango Valley Center of Edin- 
boro 

Jan. 30— Titusville Campus-University of 
Pittsburgh 

Feb. 1 — Warren Campus 

Feb. 4— at Clarion JV 

Feb. 8— at Bradford Campus of Penn State 

Feb. 17— Titusville Campus-University of 

PJttsjiTgh (away) 
Feb. 19— Bradford Campus of Penn State 

Vulcans Defeated by 
Edinboro-Shenango 

The Vulcans basketball team met defeat 
at the hands of the Edinboro-Shenango cam- 
pus team with the score of 88 to 44, last 
Saturday. In spite of the fantastic exhibit 
of school spirit, a desire to win, and hours 
of practice, the Vulcans met their match 
and were overpowered. The results of the 
game were: Edinboro, Chapman, 23, Brysh, 
14, Meheran, 13, Lucas, 10, Biro, 9, Jones, 
6, Wanser, 5, Young, 3. Zuppo, 4, and Mool; 

1, giving Edinboro a total of 88 points. For 
Venango: Pederozolli, 9, Casey, 9, Zano, 8, 
Hogan, 7, Pappas, 6, Lindow, 3, Pfeiffer, 

2, giving Clarion a total of 44. In the first 
half Shenango lead the Vulcans 50 to 23. 
In the second half Shenango scored 38 points 
while Venango scored 21. 



GRAFFITI 

If it's hard- 
it's intuitive. 

If it's easy — 

it's trivial. 

Everything else 
is obvious. 



Page 4 



THE CALL 



Clarion State College. Clarion. Pennsylvania 



Friday, December 13, 1968 



How Well Does 




"Communication^ Participation^ 
And Democracy on the Campus ^^ 



Measure Up? 



9 




Copyrlcht I95<l by PrrsJdrnt and Fcllown of Har- 
vard Collrir. Keprlntrd hy prrmUiiion •( thr au- 
Ui»r and (hr copyrlfhl holdrr. 

By ALONZO F. MYERS 

ProrrNsor-rmerituK, Nrw York I'nlvrmlty 

Communication, par- 
ticipation and democ- 
racy are inseparable. 
They are so closely re- 
lated, and each is so 
essential to the other 
two, that they must be 
treated together. I fear 
that we have been los- 
ing, rather than win- 
ning, the battle for 
democracy during the nineteen forties. This 
was probably inevitable in. view of the fact 
that during this decade we passed through 
Uie greatest war in the history of the world 
and arc still in the tragic period of react|.on, 
disillusionment and fear that followed ,ihe 
conflict. 

Each of my last two sabbatical leaves, of 
absence (1940-41 and 1948-49) wa^ spent on 
nearly 100 college and university campuses 
of the United States. My report of ob^ftrva- 
tions and conclusions based on the year spent 
in college visiting in 1940-41 included the 
statement: "I believe that American educa- 
tion, including higher education, is becoming 
ifiore democratic than it has been in the 
pa,st. 1 think this is important, as I have 
never been able to understand how an un- 
democratic educational system could 1^ of 
maximum service to a democratic society. 
Education becomes more democratic when 
it extends its benefits more nearly uniformly 
to all who have the capacity to benefit from 
it. when it develops offerings to meet the 
needs of more of our citizens, when it pro- 
vides training and experience in democratic 
living to those who are being educated, and 
when the educational establishment itself is 
conducted along democratic lines." 

, Progress Began in 1941 

It is quite true that in 1940 there were 
rtiany undemocratic practices in American 
education. At that time, however, we ap- 
peared to be making real progress toward 
reform. It was possible to point to the fact 
that in January 1941, the Association of Am- 
erican Colleges and the American As.S6clatibn 
of University Professors had been able to 
agree upon a joint declaration of prmciples 
and practices governing academic freedom 
and tenure for college faculties. In February 
1941, the American Association of Teachers 
Colleges agreed that its member institutions 
should be bound by the same set of principles. 



Many professors appear 
unapproachable. 



*t 




Why must students 
and professors- be a- 
fraid to confront one 
another? A «mall sam- 
ple Survey among the 
students of Clarion 
State College showed 
that they were afraid 
to go in and talk to 
their professors. 
Conversely, many 
professors appeared to be afraid of their 
students in one way or another. "They 
have too many hours of teaching, and 
their classes are too large. So most of 
them have given up the frequent informal, 
friendly but time-consuming contacts they 
had with their students. Perhaps it was 
necessary to do this. But the students 
were correct; they are missing something 
important." 

Professors Mount Pedestal 

Aside from this fact, many professors 
appear unapproachable. They take their 
doctorate and, along with themselves, 
place it on a "pedestal of higher educa- 
tion" and together they look down on any 
.student tr>ing to climb this pedestal. They 
arc too good to talk to a lowly student. 

Certain professors have limited their ed- 
ucation to their field of study. Consequent- 
ly, they can not carry on an everyday 
conversation. Some professors come on 
with a ' buddy- buddy, ' "fraternity Joe" 
t.vpc of personality which a student can 
recognize immediately as false. No one 
really likes to talk to a "false" person. 

Students, Faculty Must Join 

students and professors alike must join 
in together to destroy this "failure to com- 
municatc ■ block. The students must put 
aside their fears and inhibitions and learn 
to confront their professors; and the pro- 
fessors must come down off their pedes- 
tals and begin to treat the students as 
real people. 

This must be done soon or both the 
students and the professors of Clarion 
^tate College will be "missing something 
important." Neither will know where they 
are going wrong in their studies or in 
their teaching. But more important, nei- 
ther will learn how to treat people as 
people. 

TERRY CARLSON, 
Sophomore majoring in English 
(secondary education) 



Thus the administrative heads of a majority 
of all colleges in the United States had 
reached an agreement with the A.A.U.P. on 
what constituted decency in matters relating 
to academic freedom and tenure. 

In July 1941, the National Education As- 
sociation at its annual convention in Boston 
voted to establish the National Commissiuu 
for the Delense of Democracy Through Edu- 
cation and charged it specifically with respon- 
sibility for pursuing a bold program designed 
to protect education against those individuals 
or groups that dared attack .t unjustly, and 
to strengthen and improve democratic prac 
tices in education. One need only to consider 
the N.E.A. conventions held in Boston in 
1941 and 1949 to see that education has gone 
from an offensive to a defensive attitude 
during that eight-year period. 

Many Say "Yes, but . . ." 

Today we see too many people who say 
"Yes, but — " about most questions relating 
to the preservation of democratic practices 
in our society and m education. We are so 
scared of the commimist threat tnat we ap- 
pear to be almost ready to abandon democ- 
racy in order to combat communism. Our 
society, like education, is on the defensive. 
This is the great difference between 1940 
and 1949. 

During the period when the society and 
the national educational organizatior.s moved 
from the offensive to the defensive, what 
was happening on the college campus to com- 
munication and participation, the very essen- 
tials of democracy? 

In an attempt to find the answer to this 
question I spent from one day to a full week 
on each campus. Normally I met with the 
administrative officers, frequently with the 
administrative council, occasionally with 
boards of trustees and with committees of 
such boards, nearly always with the faculty 
and faculty committees, and usually with 
student councils with no officials of the col- 
lege present at the meeting. 

Communication Was Poor 

The year 1948-49 was one of exceedingly 
poor communication on college campuses. 
There is one obvious explanation for this. 
Nearly all colleges are much larger than 
they were in 1940, and most are much larger 
tlian they should be. They lack the staff, 
the plant, the equipment, and financial re- 
sources to do a good job with present inflated 
enrollments. This condition has seriously in- 
terfered with good communication. 

At one college some of the trustees told me 
that until recently they knew personally near- 
ly all faculty members. Now, they said, they 
know almost none. Faculty expansion and 
turnover have been responsible for a serious 
breach in the close and friendly relationships 
which formerly prevailed. The result, present 
on most campuses, is that the two groups, 
faculty and trustees, often have a deep sus- 
picion and distrust of each other. 

Administrator-faculty relationships have de- 
teriorated on many campuses. Again poor 



t* \ 



*Many of our faculty 
make themselves easily 
available . 



» 




Dr. Myers expresses 
concern over the lack 
of communication be- 
tween students and fa- 
culty in the undergrad- 
^^ uate schools of our 
^^^9^Uf country. The advise- 
Wl 'IHP^^ ment system at Clarion 

^K >■ flil^, Pi*ovides an effective 
^^L A^^^^ instrument for such 
■Hk »B^^» communication. 

Many of our faculty make themselves 
easily available to their advisees as well 
as to members of their classes. They give 
their students unlimited time for full dis- 
cussion. Unfortunately some faculty do not 
do this. They call their students together 
in a single group and give them an admon- 
itory lecture and call it a day. This sort 
of procedure hinders communication be 
twcen students and faculty. 

Are Students Qualified? 

Dr. Myers also calls for participation 
of students in almost every type of com- 
mittee work. Let us consider this idea. 
Where are students qualified to assist in 
college government and planning? 

Because of the fact that they are in- 
timately associated with dormitory life 
and with student opinion on other campus 
activities, students would be valuable ad- 
ditions to committees dealing with student 
government, rules and regulations. Some 
of this is done. More could be done. 

While there are probably other areas 
in which students are qualified to partici- 
pate, one precaution should be observed. 
The fact that a matter is of vital concern 
to the students is not a sufficient reason 
for involving them in decision making with 
respect to this matter any more than the 
fact that a diseased patient is vitally con- 
cerned with his recovery qualifies him 
to recommend the necessary treatment 
to his physician. 

DONALD D. PEIRCE. 
Professor-emeritus of Physical Science 



communication is largely responsible. It 
would be grossly unfair to. blame college 
presidents, or, for that matter, to blame fa- 
culties for this deterioration. PrimarUy, it 
is the situation that is to blame. Coiiege 
presidents are much too busy these days., 
Literally, they are confronted with appalling 
shortages in almost all essential categories: 
faculty, buildings, equipment, library. In 
their efforts to secure funds to enable them 
to overcome these shortages, most presidents 
find it necessary to t>e away from the cahipus 
for a major share of the time. Consaqueotly, 
all too often the president just does not know 
his faculty members. If he does not know 
them, they do not know him. In that situa- 
tion, each is likely to think the worst of 
the other. 

Wonders Why Best Men Resign 

Efforts to remedy this situation by the 
appointment of a vice-president in charge 
of faculty personnel, or an official of some 
similar title, have not always resulted hap- 
pily. This functionary, in an effort to make a 
place for himself, erects a solid barrier be- 
tween the president and the faculty. Then, 
probably fresh from military service and with 
little if any academic background, he sets 
up coUeague-rating plans and other devices 
to let him know who should be fired and 
who should be allowed to stay on another 
year. He deUvers pep talks to the faculty 
about morale and efficiency, and wonders 
why it is the best men that arc always re- 
signing. A college jannot successfully be op- 
crated like an army, a factory, or a busi- 
ness. 

Higher education has long been plagued 
by a preference on the part of many boards 
and administrative officers for permitting fa- 
culty members to know as little as possible 
about budgetary and financial matters. At 
one private liberal arts college, faculty mor- 
ale was so low at the time of our visit as 
to be almost non-existent. This faculty rea- 
soned that if money were available for a 
large increase in the number of maintenance 
personnel employed on the campus, there 
must be some money that could have been 
used for faculty salary increases^ If they 
had been permitted to know as much as 
they were entitled to know about the finan- 
cial condition of the college as yitM. as about 
the urgent need for making long-deferred re- 
pairs to the physical plant, they might have 
felt that what was being done was reasonable. 

Student Government a Farce 

At the student level the situation usually 
was worse than among the faculty. Tlie prob- 
lem raised almost universally was the apathy 
of 90 percent or more of the student body to- 
ward student government and all organized 
student activities. The net result of many dis 
cussions of this question was the conclusion 
that the great majority of all students are not 
interested because of a conviction that this 
whole complex organization for student gov- 
ernment is a farce and that it is unimportant. 

There were many examples of a lack of 
effective communication between student 
leadership and administration Rnd faculty. 
At a state teachers college in New Engls^id 
the student leaders said to me; V^c . don't 
have an opportunity to know the faculty here. 
We think we should know them. We see them 
only in class, and that is not ettough." They 
then told of one exception tO|this sta^ment. 
The English department had' been following 
the practice of having a tea each week to 
which all students taking courses in the de- 
partment were invited. They wondered why 
other departments could not' do the same 
thing. 

At this same college the pfesident .of the 
student council said: "Our president is a 
fine human sort of a fellow— if one ever 
got a chance to know him." This student 
was absolutely correct. He is just the kind 
of a man the student said he was. A few 
years ago this president knew all 500 of the 
students on that campus. There are over 1,200 
students there now. Unfortunately this admin- 
istrator no longer has time for the many 
informal meetings he used to have with the 
students. He does not even have time to 
see his faculty. 

Faculty Members Are Busy 

Faculty people are busy, too. They have 
too many hours of teaching, and their classes 
are too large. So most of them have given 
up the frequent informal, friendly, but time- 
consuming contacts they formerly had with 
their students. Perhaps it was necessary to 
do this. But the students were correct; they 
are missing something important. 

On many occasions student council mem- 
bers said that the student councU was rtierely 
a stooge for somebody — sometimes the dean 
of women, sometimes the president. They 
said all important decisions were made with- 
out consulting them. Then, they were called 
in and informed of the decision and were 
expected to sell the new policy or the new 
regulation to the student body. 

Students are in more of a hurry for the 
realization of needed reforms and improve- 
ments than are faculty people. On one oc- 
casion I informed a student council that the 
college president had said that he expected 
to have a student union building ' within five 
years. A student council member said, "So 
what! He probably will be here five years 
from now, but we won't." It is not only 
in such matters as field houses and student 
unions that students are in a hurry. They 
also want curriculum reform now. and many 
of them feel that they are not getting it. 

Frequently .stndent leaders complained re- 
garding regulations governing class atten- 
dance. They were not objecting to required 
attendance at classe.i but to tiie fact that, 



How Do You Educate Men and Women? 
Use More Democratic Procedures? 
Read Myers Article, Local Comments 



"There is the danger that the uni- 
versities, in their eagerness to please 
everyone, satisfy all demands, serve all 
needs and run off in all directions, will 
forget that their first job is to produce 
educated men and women, educated in 
the broadest and deepest sense of that 
word. There is more than a little haz- 
ard that we shall — with enormous zest 
and Organizational skill — shuffle mil- 
lions of students through utterly mean- 
ingless experiences and believe that 
we have accomplished something." 

So writes John W. Gardner, form- 
er Secretary of Health, Education, and 
Welfare, in his new book. No Easy 
Victories. Do Mr. Gardner's remarks 
apply only to large universities? 

In the hope that members of the 
Clarion State student body and facul- 
ty will be moved to do some thinking 
about the best way to educate men and 
women, the Call is reprinting "Com- 
munication, Participation, and Demo- 
cracy on the Campus" by Professor 
Alonzo F. Myers and also eleven com- 
ments on the article by Clarion stu- 
dents and teachers. The article, which 
was originally published in the Har- 
vard Educational Review in 1950. was 
made available to the Call by its au- 
thor, who is professor-emeritus at New 
York University, where for many years 
he was chairman of the Department of 
Higher Education. 

Professor Myers, who spoke to the 
Clarion faculty in the fall of 1962, is 



an old friend of Clarion's president, 
Dr. James Gemmell, who passed along 
the article to the Call but left to the 
editor and advisor the decision about 
reprinting it. 

Professor Myers raises many prob- 
lems which for years have annoyecl and 
irritated students on American college 
campuses: for example, student apathy 
toward student government, toward ex- 
tracurricular activities; student feeling 
that many of their teachers are not in- 
terested in each student as an individ- 
ual; and lack of participation by stu- 
dents in the determination of college 
policies governing the curriculum. 

Another question raised by the 
article is this: Should the Clarion Ikcul- 
ty ask the student body "for a frank, 
appraisal of instruction"? Or should 
Clarion State students (like the stu- 
dents at some colleges and universi- 
ties) design, carry out, and print their 
own evaluation of all teachers? 

Professor Myers makes it clear 
toward the end of his article that time 
is the price that both the student and 
the teacher must pay for a more demo- 
cratic governance of a college. Is bet- 
ter understanding between student and 
teacher worth the time it takes, for ex- 
ample, in arranging opportunities for 
small, informal discussions outside the 
classroom? Is student participation on 
some college committees worth the 
time it takes? 

Professor Myers and probably 



many others (students or teachers) 
would say that the answer to both 
questions is yes. 

Other questions, however, deserve 
thoughtful consideration. If students 
spend the time required to do many of 
the things mentioned in the Myers ar- 
ticle, will they have time to study for 
an exam in educational psychology, 
write a term paper about the causes 
of the French revolution, and still 
"finish Paradise Lost by Wednesday"? 
The other half of this question is 
whether faculty members would have 
time to prepare adequately for their 
classes — if a more democratic system 
3f governing a college required con- 
siderably larger amounts of time in 
both committee work with students 
and in informal contacts with students. 

The Call decided to ask several 
students and faculty members to make 
frank, specific comments on the Myers 
article as it applies to Clarion State. 
Both students and teachers were asked 
to face this question, primarily: How 
well does Clarion measure up to some 
of the important ideas in Professor 
Myers' article? 

Their comments (as well as the 
entire article) are printed in this issue. 
Readers of the Call, both students and 
faculty members, are invited to express 
their opinions on the article and the 
comments by writing letters to the edi- 
tor of the Call. 

— R.K.R. 



regardless of what the published regulation 
on the subject was, many professors had tak- 
en it upon themselves to make their own reg- 
ulations. For example, if the catalog stated 
tl^at.jjily three unexcused absences would 
be permitted in one semester, some profes- 
sors would permit none. In some instances, 
a student was subject to a different regulation 
in th^ matter for each professor under whom 
he iom a course. This was highly confusing 
and demoralizing to the students. It intro- 
duced a needless hazard in their pursuit of 
an education and a degree. I frequently found 
professors stoutly defending the practice in 
the name of academic freedom, no less. 

How Should Money Be Spent? 

In many of the colleges, neither the student 
body nor its elected representatives, the stu- 
dent council, has any participation in deter- 
mining how money provided by the required 
student activity fee shall be spent. Faculty 
members and administrative officers often 
defended the practice, insisting that they 
knew best how this money should be spent. 

The favorite punishment for violation of 
rules or for academic deficiencies is expul- 
sion. This is defended with the pious state- 
ment that "we must protect the good name 
of the college." Expulsion should be a last 
resort. When it does become necessary to 
separate a student from college, there should 
be every effort to make sure that the student 
does not leave the college until he and the 
college officials concerned are satisfied that 
they know the best next step for the student 
to take. Far too many young people are 
ruined and embittered as a result of hasty 
and arbitrary actions of faculty members 
and personnel officers whose only concern 
is the reputation and high standards of the 
college. Students are human beings, and they 
deserve to be treated as human beings. 

The attitude of the faculty members at 
one college was exceedingly antagonistic to- 
ward the students. They made it perfectly 
clear that they did not trust the students. 
Leadership in the expression of this attitude 
was exercised by the student pastor, who 
said that in his college days too great free- 
dom had been allowed students, with the 
result that many of them had gone wrong. 
He wanted to make sure that this would 
not happen at this college. 

President's Contacts With Students 

In one instance the president of a state 
teachers college requested me to write to 
him after meeting with the student council, 
giving him whatever advice or suggestions 
I had to offer as a result of this meeting. 
The students had indicated they did not know 
the college president, had almost no contacts 
with him, and did not know whether he was 
for them or against them. They evidenced 
considerable ill-will and suspicion toward the 
president. I knew the president well enwigh 
to feel sure that these attitudes were not well 
founded. I wrote to him suggesting that he 
set aside one hour each week for a conference 
with the student leaders, stating that such 
a meeting would give him a good insight 
into student attitudes and problems and would 
help to dissipate suspicion and misunder- 
standing on the part of some of the students 
The president replied that he had employed 
a director of student personnel services and 
(Contlnned on page 5) 



r 




"The committee system 

guarantees a means for 

all to participate •. ..,**. 

Alonzo F. Myers 
comments that the 
year 1948-49 was one of 
exceedingly poor com- 
munications on college 
campuses. He reasons 
that this was a result 
of the increase in size 
with its concomitant 
demands on facilities, 
financial resources and 
administrative procedures. 

Since that time, facilities and financial 
resources have appeared to be the easiest 
problems to solve, since a belief that ed- 
ucation gives youth a future has success- 
fully developed in the public sector. 

Deals With Human Beings 

Administrative procedures based on a 
pyramidal organizational structure arc 
more critical areas, because here one 
deals with human beings and their inter- 
pretations of college regulations. College 
officials as well as faculty members are 
carrying on a moral dialogue which is 
the antithesis of the authoritarian system 
which functions in most colleges. From 
grade school through college degrees, the 
student is reminded that he is an individual 
who is a part of a democratic process. 
Self-fulfillment has become the primary 
objective. 

Obviously colleges which are growing 
rapidly are bound to have problems. In 
trying to cope with size, colleges hkve 
adopted certain mass techniques which, 
however successful, lead to an often un- 
spoken suspicion by the individual that he 
is being treated like an inanimate object. 
Well-intentioned decisions made in secret- 
ive and confidential ways for the sake of 
expediency and from past habit often ap- 
pear as arbitrary decisions based on whim 
and caprice. 

Decision-Making Improved 

Yet there have been a number of suc- 
cessful proposals at colleges which have 
improved the decision-making apparatus 
through a broadening of the power base 
to encompass the concerned parties. This 
evolutionary development will continue to 
take place gradually as long as there is 
a willingness on all sides to spend the 
necessary time and to consider seriously 
Other opinions and experiences. This demo- 
cratization of procedural interpretation 
through the committee system is not easy 
or comforting to the impatient individual. 
Nevertheless, the committee system guar- 
antees a means for all to participate in 
the educational objectives of an institution. 

ADAM WEISS, 

Assistant Professor of Speech 




"The openings are here, 
the possibilities are 
.... .... ..many ^r i"J*?v ;: 

This article presents 
an idea that Clarion 
has been facing for a 
long time, the "apathy 
of 90 percent or more 
of the student body to- 
ward student govern- 
ment and all organized 
student activities." The 
apathy here is not uni- 
versal — perhaps not 
even 90 percent, but it is a problem. 
Students seem to think, as Mr. Myers 
found, that the whole organization of stu- 
dent government is a farce, and is thus 
unimportant. 

Maybe it is, but, if so, apathy doesn't 
help. Ignoring the whole idea won't make 
it any less a farce. The more the students 
participate, the more active and power- 
ful the organizations will become. We are 
seeing right now that interested students 
can bring problems to light that have lain 
undisturbed, ignored for years. 

Encountered No Obstacles 

An important prerequisite for good stu- 
dent-faculty communications is that "no 
secretary should bar a student's access 
to deans, departmental chairmen, and pro- 
fessors." I am a senior and have person- 
ally visited most of the various deans 
for some reason or other. I encountered 
no obstacles — if anything, 1 received invi- 
tations to come back. No secretary glared 
at me distrustfully or frisked me for con- 
cealed weapons. If, for some reason, they 
could not see me then, I easily made 
an appointment for later. 

The openings are here, the possibilities 
are many, but how many students actually 
go to see deans, or professors, or depart- 
mental chairmen? Not many. If they are 
worried about grades, they complain to 
friends, not professors. If it's a question 
of not understanding a concept, it is shrug- 
ged off as unimportant — not properly 
talked out with someone who knows. 
Again, it comes to this — Be Concerned! 

Orientation Improved 

In freshman orientation and counseling, 
wc mdasure up to good old AnUoch Col- 
lege. It is mostly student motivated and 
is becoming increasingly student organ- 
ized. Due to the improvements over the 
past few years, students are here given 
an "important and responsible role." It 
is our chaHce to get the new students 
concerned with THEIR college and THEIR 
welfare by beginning on a studentto- stu- 
dent basis. 

With more students taking an active in- 
terest in ALL aspects of college Ufe, the 
faculty and administration would necessar- 
ily be forced into participation— and from 
this. Clarion can develop a new student 
reputation, as well as new buildings. 

HELEN J. DALMASO, 

Senior majoring in Mathematics 

(liberal arts) 



.<^' 



f 1 



Friday, December 13, 1968 



THE CALL — Clarion State College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



Page 5 



Students, Teachers ■ Comment on Article 



' 



(Continued from page 4) 

that there were faculty committees rcspoti- 
sible for various aspects of the program ot 
student activities and student welfare. Con- 
sequently, he believed it would be inappropri- 
ate for him to establish direct contact with 
students and student leaders. He feared that 
to do so would undermine the authority ol 
officials and committees that had been giv^i 
responsibility foe .student relationships. Their 
probable resentment would have its roots 
in an attitude commonly found on college 
campuses to the effect that the student is 
always wrong; therefore, his complaints 
should not be listened to. Of course, the 
'resentment would be justified if the president 
were to reverse his officials and committees 
after listening to the student side of the ques- 
tion and not listening to theirs. Reversal is 
not always what is indicated. Frequently wliat 
would result would be better guides to future 
action. If there should be reversals, they 
should be effected not by the president but 
by the official dhrectly involved. A college 
president who adopts an open door policy 
with students should make that policy And 
its reasons perfectly clear to the staff. Most 
staff members would accept it. Student mor- 
ale Will never be good without such a pohcy. 

Dean Should Be Aeeessible 

No secretary should bar a student's access 
to deans, departmental chairmen, and pro- 
fessors. The staff is there to work with stu- 
dents. Private offices guardea by over-vigi- 
lant secretaries are one of the greatest obsta- 
cles to good communicatior. on the college 
campus. 

A college is not just one college, as it 
appears superficially to be. Usually ttitte 
are three distinct colleges, where there should 
be just one. First, and most unrealistic of 
all, since it bears almost no reseinblance 
to what actuaDy exists, there is the college 
as viewed by the trustees. All too often the 
trustees are persons who were selected for 
their wealth, prestige, or political influence, 
in the hope that they will do something sub- 
stantial for the college. FrequenUy they are 
people who themselves did not attend ' the 
college and who ' would not think of send- 
ing their own children there. Yet, they deter- 
mine the policies under wUch the college 
is governed. Rarely do they have any con- 
tact with faculty or students. 

Then there is the college seen through tiie 
c.ves of the administration and faculty. Fre- 
quently this is in itself two colleges, the 
college of the administration and the college 
of the faculty. The administration-faculty col- 
lege is reoresented through the various pub- 
licity media utilized by Uie'tWJege. An h<mor 
system, for example, as seen through the 
eyes of the faculty, and as portrayed in the 
college publicity, is a very different thing 
from what '* is as actually experienced by 
the students. Student government is a won- 
derful example of democrrcy in action on 
the college campus as seen through the eyes 
of the faculty and as written up in the cat- 
alog. Students on many campuses know that 
student government is merely a democratic 
facade designed to fool the pubUc and the 
students into believing that the college is 
preparing the students for responsible leader- 
ship in a democratic society. Most students 
are not being fooled. They know totalitarian- 
ism when they see it, even when it is being 
practiced on the campus. 

Student Ideas Should Be Heard 

The third college, the one that the student 
knows, is the real college. Many teachers 
are gS^atly concerned over their own lack 
of participation in the determination of pol- 
icies that are vital to their welfare. There 
is too Uttle concern by the teachers over 
the lack of participation by students in the 
determination of policies that are of great 
importance to the students' welfare. Students 
rightly believe that the curriculum is a mat- 
ter of vital concern to them. Their ideas on 
the curriculum deserve to be heard by the 
faculty. Yet, rarely do we find student repre- 
sentation on college curriculum committees. 
Students know more about the quality and 
effectiveness of college teaching than any- 
body else. Seldom do we find college facul- 
ties asking students for a frank appraisal 
of instruction. 

Fortunately, not all colleges are like those 
that have been described. At some of the 
colleges visited there was high morale on 
the part of botli students and faculty. In 
these colleges there was good communica- 
Ubn, absence of suspicion, and th? maximum 
of participation. Bad morale on the part of 
a student council does not exist when its 
members arc able to say that the ' presi- 
dent's door is always open to them. 

A Student Council Acts 

At the North Carolina State College at Dur- 
ham, I met a student council that was not 
discouraged. It was one of the few that be- 
lieved it had been given enough responsi- 
bility. Student council members were sure 
that their problem was how, to measure t^p 
to the responsibility that had been given 
them. President Elder had requested a joint 
student-faculty committee to as-sumc full re- 
sponsibility for preparation of the student 
handbook for the following year, which in- 
cluded responsibility for regulations govern- 
ing student conduct. The students told about 
the many open meetings which had been 
held for the consideration of regulations Uiat 
were under question. Some regulations had 
been dropped or modified; some had been 
retained after their reason for existence had 
been explained. For the first time students 
were to be governed by rules of their own 
making. The rules were not too different 
from the former ones. The difference was 
in the attitude of the students toward the 



rules. Under the old system it was sporting 
to violate a .ful4. Under the new plMi it 
was no longer so. If one disagreed with a 
rule he had the means of working to have 
it rescinded or modified. Of course, not all 
students had immediately adopted (hat atti- 
tude, but it was a possibihty worth working 
fef. One student leader said: "When we got 
through working on that new handbook, I 
believe there was not a student here who 
would riot have welcomed an opportunity to 
vote for Dr. Elder for President of tlie Uni- 
ted States." 

Antioch Students Participate 

Anttoch College has a greater amount of 
student participation and a higher student 
morale than any college that I know. The 
Antioch student knows the objectives and the 
philosophy of Antioch better than most col- 
lege professors know the philosophy of the 
college at which they teach. In the fall of 
1948, lh« new president had suggested to 
the faculty and students that the beginning 
of a new admijustration might be a propitious 
Ume for all concerned to evaluate the pro- 
gram and porppses of the pollege and to 
consider the possible need for some redirec- 
tion of effort. Every student and every faculty 
member seemed seriously engaged in this 
ta|k. An Antioch student recognizes that he 
is a fully participating member of the col- 
lege community. He knows that his good 
ideas >^ill receive the same careful consider- 
ation as will those of a faculty member or 
an administrative officer. 

There is so much student participation at 
Anttoch that the work cannot be done entire- 
ly W volunteer student effort. There has 
he«ft e^taMish*^ the Antioch community with 
every student ^hd faculty member considered 
a full citizen. This community elects a com- 
munity council of six students and three fa- 
culty or administrative staff members, which 
is responsible foar conducting community af- 
fairs. The council employs a student as com- 
munity manager. For the year of his em- 
ployment the community manager gives his 
full tim«f'*td the duties of his office. 

, Students Are on Committees 

l^e adhnlnistrative coimcil of the college 
and each faculty committee has student 
membership. Students Seem to participate 
firily and actively In every aspect of the 
operation of the > college. In the counseling 
of freshmen, for, example, students have an 
important and a responsible role. 

At Antioch, students evaluate the instruc- 
tion that they receive. Unlike most colleges 
which have student evaluation of teaching, 
at Antioch the Students' sigWthfelf ratings. 
I asked one of the student leaders if it were 
not a bit hazardous to say what he thought 
about a faculty member's teaching and then 
to sign his name to it. He said: "No. The 
faculty is just as much interested in improv- 
ing the instruction as the students are." 

How much better this is than at most col- 
leges ;where there is no plan for student 
evaluation of instruction. Usually when there 



'Th^^mafority of teachers 
seern indifferent . . /* 







Many of Mr. Myers' 
comments v^ere rele- 
vant to the situation 
here at Clarion State, 
but I think most of 
them ,caa be summed 
up in a \ si|\gle state- 
ment: Clai'lon State 
College is not a stu- 
dent'oriented college; 
the system i> not gear- 
ed to nieet the needs and wants of the 
students but to comply with the designs 
ahd convenience of the faculty and ad- 
ministration. 

I agree with Mr. Myers' finding that 
"There is too little concern by the teach- 
ers over the lack of participation by stu- 
dents in the determination of policies that 
are of great importance to the student 
welfare." The majority of teachers seem 
indifferent to the needs of the student 
inside and outside the classroom. It seems 
that the emphasis is not placed on the 
amount of learning that transpires but 
on claSs attendance, not on providing an 
interesting and stimiilating classroom ses- 
sion but on covering the required amount 
Gl' material. 

Student Opinion Not Requested 

• Most teachers seem totally unconcerned 
about the students' opinion of their class- 
room performance. Few, if any, request 
student ratings or seriously consider stu- 
dent criticisms when they are offered. 
Few are concerned about the fact that 
the curriculum is inflexible and that stu- 
dents arc overburdened with an abundance 
of required Subjects which should be kept 
to a minimum. And even fewer are con- 
cerned witiii student needs outside the 
classroom. 

The result — more apathy in an already 
apathetic student body. The most com- 
petent stadeats don't bother to run for 
student government positions because they 
feel that "student government is a farce," 
and less than 10 percent of the student 
pofHilatioa votes for its representatives be- 
cause the most competent students are 
not on Uie ballot. This makes for a very 
efficient educational system and a dissat- 
isfied but cooperative student body. 

CONSTANCE CARTER, 

Senior majoring in English and Speech 

(secondary education) 



is such a plan, the student is cautioned not 
to sign the rating. % | 

At Reed College in Portland, Oregon, itier| 
is an unusually large mea.sure of participa- 
tion by both students and faculty. A student 
educational policies committee, consisting of 
ten students appointed by the student coun- 
cil, functions to provide an ofticial means 
for student expressions on matters affecting 
educational policy. The student educational 
policies committee is credited by the faculty 
with several curriculum reforms and Uuaova- 
tions at Reed. ., . 

Reed Faculty Participates 

Reed College has a constitution thatntftkci, 
definite provision for democratic participa- 
tion by the faculty in administration.' Th^ 
constitution provides for a council consisting 
of the president, ex-officio. and eight mem- 
bers elected by the faculty. All proposed 
recommendations of the president t<j the 
board of trustees relating to the budget, the 
appointment of new members to the faculty, 
changes in the title, salary, or the discon* 
tinuance of the services of any member of 
the faculty must first come before the coun- 
cil for consideration. Proposals which receive 
the approval of a majority of the members 
present and voting are then presented to 
the board of trustees. When a proposal is 
rejected by the council, the question is re- 
ferred to a special committee composed of 
the president, two members selected by the 
council, and two members selected by the 
trustees. 

Democratic operation is time-consuming. 
Many people object to it on this ground alone. 
They say that it would be desirable theoret- 
ically, but that in practice it will not work 
successfully because of the time required 
to get things done. There is nothing theoreti- 
cal about this matter. Democratic operation 
works where people believe in democracy 
enough to be willing to take the time to 
make it work. I am convinced that there 
is no more important way for all persons 



"If we were sure our 
complaining would 



do any good . 



>» 




Communications be- 
tween students and fa- 
culty is vital to the life 
of a college campus. 
Here, at Clarion, I feel 
that this tj-pe of com- 
munication is very 
weak. The blame is us- 
ually placed on the stu- 
dent body. We are the 
ones labeled disinter- 
ested or apathetic. But ^hat is the cause 
of this disinterest? Is the problem reaUy, 
one of disinterest at all? .. , 

Referring to the article written by frq- 
fessor Myers, a student attending Antipch 
college was asked if he thought it a little 
"hazardous" to sign his name to an Qt^l- 
uation which he had written on one of 
his courses. "No," he answered. "The''jfa- 
culty is just as much interested in ' Im- 
proving the instruction as the students 
are." Could we say the same about the 
entire faculty at Clarion? Do we eyen 
have a system of evaluating our classes 
and if we did, would our opinions really 
be taken into consideration? 

Is Student Always Wrong? 

Or how would we react to Professor 
Myers' statement that "an attitude com- 
monly found on college campuses" is that 
"the student is always wrong; therefore, 
his complaints should not be listened to"? 
Is this the "attitude commonly found" on 
Clarion campus? 

Most students fail to act or react not 
because of uninterest in college affairs 
but because of a fear in acting or re- 
acting. We hesitate to speak up even if 
it be in the form of signing a petition 
because we fear the consequences. In the 
confines of the dorm, around the dinner 
table, to and from classes, complaints are 
made left and right by the students. But 
when it comes to actually putting these 
words into action by complaining to the 
right people we immediately shut up. Of 
course, there arc a few students who do 
try to get something done, but without 
sufficient backing from the rest of us their 
efforts are wasted. 

Students Are Interested 

Whether it be grades ("Does she really 
know more than mc just because she got 
an A and I got a B?"), or courses ("Will 
this course really do us any good after 
we graduate?"), or teachers ("He doesn't 
care how boring his classes are. He must 
have used the same notes for 20 years 
now."), or any other aspect of college life, 
there is plenty of student interest. We do 
care what goes on around us. If we were 
sure that our complaining would do any 
good, if we were sure that our suggesti<Mis 
would be respected and listened to, we 
would be all too willing to vMce them. 

What is needed is a little more encour- 
agement on the part of the deans and 
the faculty. We need to know whom to 
go to with our various complaints and 
suggestions. We need an attentive ear that 
will listen to them and a reassurance that 
we will not be discriminated against be- 
cause of them. 

CAROLE DVORAK. 
Senior majoring in Spanish 
(Hberal arts) 



rhgagod in the operation of an educational 
institution to spend their time Uiau finding 
but how to achieve succcssfu' operation 
through democratic processes. From the 
standpoint of our educational responsibihty 
there is a clear necessity for making the 
college a model of democracy in action. From 
the standpoint of student and faculty morale 
alone, democratic operation pays huge divi- 
dends. 

First, What Is the Problem? 

What should a college do to improve com- 
munication and "participation on the campus 
to make the college a model of democracy 
in action? On many campuses the first neces- 
sity is for all concerned to become aware 
of the problem. At some colleges I have 
found that even the students appear to be 
completely unintl^rested in achieving any mea- 
sure of participation in relation to those mat- 
ters affecting their welfare. 

Assuming an awareness of Ihe problem 
and a desire on the part of trustet^s, admin- 
istration, faculty, and student body to do 
something about it, I would recommend that 
the college hold p constitutional convention 
at which representatives of the trustees, the 
administration, the faculty, and student body 
would work together to develop a constitution 
for the college. 

The constitution should recognize the fol- 
lowing: 

1. Legal authority for the approval of ma- 
jor policy decisions and for many other mat- 
ters, rests with the board of trustees; there 
should be full participation in its formulation 
by groups which would be directly affected 
by the policy or decision. 

2. Safeguards against autocratic adminis- 
tration are necessary, and specific provisions 
for participation by interested groups before 
administrative decisions are made, must al- 
ways be included. 

3. Primary responsibility for curriculum 
and academic standards rests which the facul- 
ty, but the means whereby .students may 
participate with the faculty in these matters 
should be set up. 

4. Tlie faculty has responsibility in matters 
relating to appointment, retention, and pro- 
motion of faculty members; safeguards 
should be included to prevent actions by the 
administration or the board of trustees with- 
out faculty participation, and faculty mem- 
bers' right to appeal should be guaranteed. 

Student Role Is Paramount 

5. The res|)onsibility of the student body 
for the direction of student government, stu- 
dent activities, the student activities budget, 
ancf'iailes and regulations governing student 
conduct is paramount, and the veliicle for 
leg^mate interest in these matters on the 
part of faculty, administration, and trustees 
shoiild be provided. 

6. Committees consisting of representatives 
of the trustees, administration, faculty, and 
the student body in relation to matters of 
common concern should be established. 

7? The legitimate interest of the faculty 



in matters relating to budget and salaries 
should be recognized and provision should 
be made for faculty participation in relation 
to these matters. 

8. The interest of the faculty and the stu- 
dent body in the selection of an administra- 
tive head for the institution when a vacancy 
occurs and the selection of an administra 
tivc head for a school or division in the 
case of complex university organizations is 

(Continued on page 6) 




"Students must act . , ,by 

shouldering individual 

responsibilities . . ,** 

My reaction to Dr. 
Myers' article is "a- 
mon!" The problems 
he discusses are Clar- 
ion's problems, for it 
is clear to everyone 
that Clarion is an au- 
tocratic school whose 
democratic institutions 
are facades, and the 
solutions he proposes 
could be Clarion's, if we can eliminate the 
communication problem. 

I feel Clarion's communication problem 
is largely due to student apathy. How 
can an administration communicate with 
a student body that does not care about 
voting for class officers or meeting the 
president? When only a handful of students 
show responsibility, it is inevitable that 
power will slip into the hands of adminis- 
trators, who may or may not be compe- 
tent. 

Easier to Play Cards 

students realize that it is much easier 
to play cards in the union than it is to 
perform one's civic duties, such as voting, 
holding offices, attending meetings, and 
just reading newspapers. What they fail 
to realize is that their apathy contributes 
to the growth of that autocracy they de- 
plore. 

Democracy, let's face it, is a lot of 
work. It places responsibility on every- 
one's shoulders, and unless everyone ac- 
cepts that responsibility, it does not work. 
Accepting one's responsibility does not 
consist of shouting obscenities outside stu- 
dent senate meetings and writing slogans 
on fences. If after announcing our dis- 
content, we sit and expect the adminis- 
tration to soothe our ills, we are encourag- 
ing the growth of administrative autocra- 
cy. Students must act themselves to cure 
their discontent, and only by shouldering 
their individual responsibilities can they 
do so. 

LINDA MASON 

Junior majoring in English 

(secondary education) 




"This is where Clarion 
needs criticism" 

In his article, Mr. 
Myers stresses the im- 
portance of communi- 
cation in the "demo- 
cratic" college com 
munity. lit- cUuras that 
apathy among the stu- 
dent body is a result of 
a lack of communica- 
tion between student- 
faculty and student-ad- 
ministration. By doing this he assumes 
that students, faculty, and administratioq 
are three separate entities that should be 
working tOward some kind of equality. 
He stresses this idea further by citmg 
institutions where student participation is 
present. 

I agree with his theory, but think that 
it can very easily lead to chaos. An in- 
crease in involvement has to be accom- 
panied by an increase of awareness on 
the part of the administration and faculty 
— awareness of how students think. 

As a single student at Clarion State Col- 
lege, I feel that I have no say in how 
the college is run. I doubt whether the 
student body as a whole has more than 
a minimal effect on administrative or de- 
partmental procedures and decisions. Al- 
though it seems to be in vogue in our 
"modem" colleges to be aware of all as- 
pects of your college experience, for some 
reason I'm not' concerned. 

"When I Leave Here . . ." 

I look on Clarion as an educational in- 
stitution, JVOT as a community or an or- 
ganization. When I leave here, I hope to 
be able to handle myself in front of a 
class of high school students. There is 
no course pf study , at CHarion that can 
be mastered in four or five years. In 
my particular field, I feel tiiat I've barely 
scratched the surface. I think my time 
is best spent exploring that surface. I 
hardly feel qualified to teach as an edu- 
cation major; 1 am looking forward to 
my "first'', educajtiqn course, student teach- 
ing, which I hope will be an effective 
preparation for my career. 

What I know about teaching that I didn't 
when I signed up as an education major 
back in '65 could be written on a three 
by five card. This is where Clarion needs 
criticism. Before the student senate and 
ediior4aIusltsi,tbejr„tL^je..in^py.) bfcome con- 
cerned with "student involvement" maybe 
they should explore and re-evaluate, con- 
tinually, the effectiveness of Clarion as 
a place for learning. 

DAVID M. WEILAND, 
Senior majoring in Spanish 
(secondary education) 



Can We Carry Out Myers ^ Proposals, 
Grant Students Equality With Faculty? 
Mrs. Bays Asks, and Suggests Answers 



**From these discussions a 
beginning could be 
made . 



M 




All over the world en- 
raged students are riot- 
ing. In the United 
States they have lock- 
ed up admimstrators 
and in Europe they 
have waved the flag of 
Mao - Tse - Tung. We 
have seen it all on tele- 
vision, but what does 
it mean? Why are the 
students so angry? No one seems to know 
really. One hears much pious talk about 
"law and order," but little attempt or 
concern, for the causes of the unrest. 
"Th^y are spoiled kids who've had too 
much," says the older generation who 
grew up under the depression. 

I believe we have to look elsewhere 
for the causes. We have educated larger 
numbers of people than ever before and 
when we educate (or even half-educate) 
people, they are less wiUhig to accept 
the social diseases of poverty, racial dis- 
crimination and war than previous gener- 
ations. Is it really so difficult to under- 
stand that young men are the ones revolt- 
mg against Vietnam? After all they are 
the ones bcmg forced to die there and 
not the shocked preservers of "law and 
order." 

The Right to Refuse 

But the Establishment does not think 
that the young have a right to refuse 
to go to war. "This is unpatriotic," it 
says. But if the young do not have the 
right to decide for themselves on a Ufe 
and death matter which concerns them 
personally, then they have become mere 
chattel, the property of the government 
and the draft a disguised form of slavery. 
The more intelligent and articulate ones 



understand this and resent it; the less 
intelligent tend to accept the cliches of 
tne Establishment. 

The article written by Alonzo Myers in 
1950 asking for more democracy on cam- 
pus seems to have foreseen some of this 
unrest. However, if Clarion State College 
were to carry out the numerous proposals 
mentioned at the end of the article as 
desirable, both faculty and students would 
have to abandon their courses for about 
a year and devote themselves to a monu- 
mental task of campus re-organization. 
Then when wc were all finally organized, 
would we really have that democratic Uto- 
pia on campus? This requlreu more faith 
in organization than I have. I am inclined 
to think that such a reshuffling would 
lead rather to power struggles among us 
and a dissipation of energy which would 
best be spent in what should be our chief 
concern: the liberal education of our stu- 
dents. 

Antioch Not a Model 

Mr. Myers holds up two institutions as 
models of demociacy for us: North Caro- 
lina State Ck>llege and Antioch. I know 
little about the former, but I taught four 
years at the latter and I do not consider 
it a model of human relations. Faculty- 
admini-stration relations are much better 
at Clarion and although students here do 
not have enough voice in decision-making, 
students there have too much. There is 
no honor system here, but I would say 
that here is just as much honor, if I 
am to judge by how faithfully students 
here return books they have borrowed 
from me. 

All this raises the question which most 
of us must have asked ourselves recentiy 
on seeing the rioting on television: how 
much power should students have? Are 
there no limits to it? If so. what should 
these limits be? The article by Mr. Myers 



seems to. consider that students should 
have equal power with the faculty and 
administration in making academic de- 
cisions, curricalum changes, etc. I do not 
agree with this for the very common sense 
reason tliat (except before the law) stu- 
dents and faculty are not in fact equal. 
They are not equal in age, experience, 
or knowledge. This is nothing against them 
since they are potential equals and our 
job is to help Uiem arrive, at that full 
potential. 

Student Opinions Requested 

I cannot imagine freshmen or even sen- 
iors .selecting the textbooks for my cour- 
ses, but I have many times asked their 
opinions abt)ut a certain text and if they 
give a number of negative answers, I have 
abandoned the book. Faculty should .solicit 
the opinions of students regarding the 
courses offered and the content. Valuable 
suggestions come from them, but the over- 
all refipon.sibility should remain in the 
hands of the faculty member. A serious 
petition from the students to the faculty 
or administration should be given careful 
consideratiqn. . Members from each of 
these groups should get together and dis- 
cuss whatever the students consider grie- 
vances. 

What we need at Clarion at the moment 
is more dialogue outside of class between 
faculty, students and administrators. In 
this respect I agree with Mr. Myers that 
the heart of most campus problems lies 
in a breakdown of communication among 
the various groups. From these discussions 
a beginmng could be made toward more 
democracy at Cljtrion. But 1 do not believe 
that power struggles lead to understanding 
and there is altogether too much interest 
on many campuses in getting power. It 
has nothing to do with the purpose of our 
being here: a liberal education. 

GWENDOLYN BAYS. 

Professor of French and German 



Pace 6 



THE CALL 



Clarion State College, Clarion, Penrtsylvatila 



Friday, December 13, 1968 



T%¥€» Fiirllier Coiiiiiicmi 
On ilie Myers Artirlo 




'^Philosophically^ who is 
our president?** 

1 feel partly more 
capable of commenUng 
on student-faculty and 
student - administra- 
tion relationship. It is 
not that I consider my- 
self well-versed on the 
democratic or c o m - 
niunicalive relationship 
existing here, rather, I 
can identify more read- 
ily with the student. I trust that faculty 
assigned to these comments wiU undertake 
the task of relating to and commenting 
on faculty administrative or faculty-pre- 
sident relationship existing on our campus, 
provided of course, that some sort of rela- 
tionship does exist. 

Is it possible that this article by Mr. 
Myers was written with ouc ooyege*^-. 
pecially in mind? Practically evilry' stife- 
nunit concerning student versus adminis- 
tration and faculty can be paralleled witb 
Clarion State College. Fot jnatimce, stu^ 
dent ideals on a cut system, tfie never- 
ending suspicion that student government, 
is a farce, expulsion from school being' 
the favorite punishment for .violation of 
rules, and that innermost concern by a 
majority of students: "Who is our Pre- 
sident?" 

Who Is Dr. Gemmell^ 

Philo.sophically, who is our president? 
Of course, it's Dr. Gemmell. The^ri again 
ask me, Who is Dr. Gemmell? Of course, 
he's our president! is it our own ignor- 
ance or lack of curiosity that limits our 
knowledge of our president? 

Is he for or against stwdeut ideals for 
reform at Clarion? Would peaceful protest 
for change of a college poiicy be under- 
stood or crushed? Did he enjoy the* hippy 
wedding? In all seriousness, a direct quote 
from Mr. M.yers' article by a member 
of student government "Our president is 
a fine human sort of fellow — if one ever 
got a chance to know him." Also, "... 
they did not know the college president 
and did not know whether he was for 
or against them." 

About expulsion. "Far too mai.y young 
people are ruined and embittered as a 
result of hasty and arbitrary actions of 
faculty members and D»eps0ttnel officers 
whose only concern is the reputation and 
high stanaards of the college. Students 
are human beings. and^OiS^JSlli^^^£. to 
be treated as human beings." 

Most of these quotes speak for them- 
selves: 

Council Was a Stooge 

About student government: "... stu- 
dent council members said the council 
was merely a stooge for somebody, some- 
times the dean of men, sometimes the 
president.'' Can anybody draw a parallel 
to Clarion? 

"We are so scared of the communist 
threat that we appear to be almost ready 
to abandon democracy in order to combat 
communism." 

Think this statement out carefully, using 
your imagination; I think you may find 
it to be true on a somewhat smaller scale 
right here at our college! 

We are so afraid to be acted upon by 
disciplinarians that we abandon our own 
desired principles of change and reform 
or become passive in order to avoid ad- 
ministrative or disciplinary tactics. 

You must read this article by Mp. My- 
ers. As I said in the beginning, it surely 
must have been written for our college. 
JOHN DORISH, 
Junior majoring in Drama 
(liberal arts) 




'*My personal experience 

. . . they rise to the 

challenge . . ." 

It is always hard to 
admit that you are 
wrong. For some time 
I have felt that Clarion 
had not entered the 
twentieth century (re 
.student and faculty use 
of automobiles or even 
bicycles), but after 
reading Mr. Myers' ar- 
ticle, I find that in relation to other insti- 
tutions of higher learning, Clarion is only 
20 years behind the times. 

In Myers' article the author attributes 
the generally poor communication on col- 
lege campuses in 1948-49 to the tremendous 
growth rate of all colleges at that time. 
What is Clarion's excuse? Last year the 
college community witnessed the peremp- 
tory dismissal of Dr. M. Alice Davis for 
reasons that were never explained to eith- 
ier the faculty or students. In the absence 
of communication it appears that the col- 
lege knuckled under to threats from the 
outside community. 

Should Evolution Be Deleted? 

What will be the position of the college 
if, as has been the case, we are requested 
to delete the subject of evolution from 
^ur biology curriculum? Are these matters 
which can not be entrusted to the inex- 
perienced hands of students and faculty, 
but must be reserved for decision by the 
wise and experienced deans and executive 
assistants? Communication, I believe, 
would solve many of our problems by 
giving to those affected by decisions the 
facts upon which administrative decisions 
are made. 

Myers states: "The attitude of the fa- 
culty members at one college was ex- 
ceedingly antagonistic toward the stu- 
dents. They made it perfectly clear that 
Jhey did not trust the students." Was he 
talking about Clarion? I find this attitude 
to be almost universal among the faculty 
and administration here. 

What happens during the summer be- 
tween the time the irresponsible Clarion 
student graduates and a pillar of trust 
and respect assumes the obligations of 
teaching our children in the public schools. 
Does a Clarion diploma immunize our gra- 
J, duatgs_3gainst the great social diseases 
of irresponsibility and immaturity? My 
personal experience here has been that, 
if students are given trust and responsibil- 
ity, they rise to the challenge. 

GEORGE A. HARMON, 
Professor of Biology 




Mitchell's Panorama for Band' 
To Be Premiered in Chicago 



Next Friday, December 20, J. Rex Mitchell, 
assistant professor of music at Clarion State, 
will conduct his own original composition at 
the Mid-West National Band and Orchestra 
Clinic in Chicago. 

Mr. Mitchell's composition is( an overture 
entitled "Panorama for Band, A Symphonic 
Portrait of Americana." It has be«n pub- 
lished by the Edward B. Marks Music Cor- 
poration of New York City. "Panorama 
for Band" was first performed by the Clarion 
State College Concert Band. 

This is the second consecutive year that 
Mr. Mitchell has had musical compositions 
premiered at the convention. 



Faculty Senate Tables Proposals 
On Political Science, Math Program 



The Faculty Senate meetings of December 
2 land 9 were primarily concerned with two 
controversial issues. 

The fir.st was the recommendation by the 
Department of Political Science to add a new 
course titled Selected Topics. Each semester 
the course was offered, it would be changed 
to a different specific topic. The flexibility 
of this course would allow the present faculty 
to teach a course in their special field, and 
as new members are added to the faculty, 
they too could teach in their own special 
fiqld without the trouble of adding a new 
course. A member of the faculty asked Dean 
Moore if this would cause too much con- 
fusion in registering, and he said "No, if a 



A Spotlight on Other Campuses 



Temple University— ..« ,ip;«^B»4a^;j 

The Fraternity Coordinating. CommitLfe,of 
Temple University, is in" th& processW Es- 
tablishing their own neVi*pap*f. The GreeMs' 
objective is "a well written journalistic piece 
that will encompass a majority of the Temple 
student body." The Greeks hope the ijejvs- 
paper will help give incoming 0-esbHi«||i an 
insight into Greek life and all its aspects. 



Edinboro State foHeg€ 






Courses in Chinese I 4nd Chinese II are 
now available to students at Edinboro. 

Penn State— 

Penn State has officially accepted the 
Orange Bowl bid. Penn State is ranked third 
in the nation with a standing of 8-0. The 
Orange Bowl will take place in Miami, Fla., 
on New Years night. 

Temple University — 

Juniors and seniors in theater and com- 
munications at Temple University will be of- 
fered a choice of one pass or fail.'cour^ next 
.semester The course must be an elective 
and cannot be within the students' field of 
concentration. 

This pro|K)sed pass or fail plan is awaiting 
final approval. Dr. Kenneth Harwood, dean of 
the School of Communications and Theater, 
believes that the proposal will be approved 



jl^ause of tlie unanimous teacher backing it 
has received. 

tlaiversity of Dayton — 

As a service to the students of the Univer- 
sity of Dayton the Student Government is de- 
vising a program of course evaluation. This 
.student organization hopes the program will 
help the student to know what is expected in 
each course including its content, type of 
testing, papers required, and the amount of 
discussion involved in the course. 

This course analysis will be completed be- 
fore the end of the present semester and will 
be ready for use in spring registration. 

East Stroudsburg State College— 

The Academic Affairs CouncU of the East 
Stroudsburg Speech Department will present 
"A Funny Thing Happened to Me on the Way 
to the Forum," Friday and Saturday, De- 
cember 13 and 14, in the college auditorium 
at 8 p.m. 

Attention Seniors 

The 1^ Sequelle will cover the entire 1968- 
69 school year. Because of the length of 
time involved, all Seqnelles will be mailed 
to seniors. Please write your "name and com- 
plete home address on a piece of paper and 
return it to the Sequelle office by December 
16. 



different code number is used for each topic 
when submitted to the computer." 

Many other questions arose, such as tlie 
amount of funds needed, if the course was 
really necessary, if the needed books were 
already in the library, and if each particular 
topic would be approval by the Senate. Not 
all of these questions were answered satis- 
factorily, and it was decided that the propo- 
sal should be resubmitted next semester. 

The other controversial issue was the pro- 
posal to pass the Master of Science program 
in mathematics. At least four departments 
opposed the program and raised questions: 
"Shouldn't there be electives in other fields 
besides mathematics offered in the pro- 
gram?" "Is the use of graduate students to 
teach mathematics courses desirable?" "How 
does the proposed program prepare the stu- 
dents in mathematics for business and indus- 
try?" 

Because the members of the Senate could 
not agree on the proposal, it was tabled 
until the next meeting. 

COLLEGE SLATED TO EXPAND 
TO NORTHEAST ACROSS MAIN 

Clarion State College will expand northeast- 
ward across Main Street, according to plans 
approved at the November 21st meeting of the 
college board of trustees. 

The new expansion plan wiU enlarge the 
present campus by an estimated 250 to 350 
acres, which will help to accommodate the 
projected student enrollment of 6,200 in ten 
years. New construction amounting to 16 mil- 
lion dollars is now underway or scheduled on 
the existing campus, and an additional eight 
million dollars of construction has been au- 
thorized for the future. 

Dr. Myers' Article 

(Continued from page 5) 

important, and provision for their participa- 
tion in such selection and nomination must 
be present. 

9. Official representatives of the faculty 
and of the student body should sit on the 
board of trustees, and where legal restrictions 
prevent such membership, these refM-esenta- 
tives should have full right to attend meet- 
ings and to participate in discussion. 

10. A constitutional convention should be 
held at ten-year intervals for the purpose 
of amending the existing constitution or draft- 
ing a new one. 



Last year two compositions were premier- 
ed. They were the "Canzonetta from Violin 
Concerto, Opus 35" by P. I. Tschaikovsky 
arranged for a clarinet and alto sax solo with 
a symphonic band accompaniment and the 
"Song of the City" for an alto sax solo and 
band written by Mr. Mitchell. These arrange- 
ments were played by the Vandercook Col- 
lege of Music Band. This band is made up of 
over 70 members. Mr. Mitchell was also 
a guest conductor last year for the conven- 
tion. 

It is estimated that from five to eight 
thousand public school and college instructors 
will attend the convention. Teachers will 
come from aU over the United States and 
Canada. This is the 22nd annual convention. 

"Panorama for Band" will be performed 
also at the Eastern Division Convention of 
Music Educators National Conference. The 
North Hills High School Band from Pitts- 
burgh will play the composition. This per- 
formance wiU be held on February 1, 1969 
in Washington, D. C. It will also be played 
at the Ohio State Music Convention in Colum- 
bus, Ohio, on February 8, 1969. 

Dr. Stanley F. Michalski, professor of music 
at Clarion, will also accompany Mr. Mitchell. 

Slides Shown 
Of Archaeology 
Summer School 

Monday night the students of CSC who 
were unable to attend the Fifth Annual Arch- 
aeology Field School last summer were given 
an opportunity to view slides taken during 
the session. 

Clarion State College established this an- 
nual field school to provide training in mod- 
ern methods and theories of field archaeology 
by combining classroom and laboratory work 
with actual field excavation experience dur- 
ing a six weeks period. The program is gear- 
ed to undergraduate students and is one of 
the less than 20 programs in the United States 
that cater exclusively to undergraduates. 

Each year the first three weeks of the 
school are spent on the Clarion campus and 
are devoted to theory and laboratory tech- 
niques. Last year the second three weeks, 
or the excavation phase, were spent at the 
Zeigler site (36-Wa-80) near Tidioute, Pa. This 
site represents a large prehistoric settlement 
adjacent to the Allegheny River. 

Twenty participants representing 13 acade- 
mic institutions (including the University of 
Pittsburgh, University of Chicago, University 
of New Mexico) were involved in last sum- 
mer's program. The participants excavated 
portions of the Zeigler site which had been 
begun during the 1967 Field School session, 
and completed excavations of one small hunt- 
teg station on th: Allegheny Plateau, known 
•s Raven Rock V. 

A somewhat larger program is planned 
for next summer. The Annual Field School 
is an integral part of Clarion's academic 
offering. Its growth since 1964, when the first 
Field School was held for nine students indi- 
cates not only a need for programs in which 
Undergraduates can actively participate in 
primary research while learning, but the 
growth also shows that Clarion's program is 
becoming known in other parts of the coun- 
try. 




CORTEZ PliRYEAR is congiatulated by Dr. John Mellon, dean of liberal 
arts, for placing first in the President's Cup Orations hold Wednesday in 
Peirce Auditorium. Cortez was awarded the cup, known historically as 
"the Jefferson Cup." for his speech, "They Say." Watching are Connie 
Carter, second place winner with "The Promised Land," and Betti Fer- 
guson. 



ON THE FVTVRE OF VENANGO CAMPUS 

Effect of Heald, Hobson Report 
To Determine Continuation 



By KATIIY RODGERS 

The Heald, Hobson report on off-campus 
centers of Pennsylvania is of great conctni 
to per.sons interested in the future of Venango 
Campus. Whether Vthango Campus will con- 
tinue to function 'as a branch of Clarion State 
College is a major question eoncorning many 
people of Venango County. The answer to 
the question depends upon the cifecl of the 
Heald, Hobson rc{M)rt. 

In June of 1967 the Penn.sylvania State 
Board of Education contracted Heald, Hobson 
and Associates, Incorporated, of New York 
City, to conduct a study of off-campus cen- 
ters of the statc-rclatod and state owned col- 
leges and universities of Pennsylvania. The 
intention of the State Board of Education 
in making such an agreement was to collect 
data concerning such institutions in order 
to arrive at a deci.sion determining which 
type of institution would provide the most 
economical expenditure of state funds and 
the best educational opportunities for the citi- 
zens of the state. 

After a year's study, Heald, Hobson and 
Associates compiled a report of their findings 
entitled "Off-Campus Centers in Pennsylvan- 
ia." The report makes definite recommenda- 
tions concerning the institutions studied. 
Some' off-campus centers would remain as 
they are presently; others would be con- 
verted into four year colleges; still others 
would be phased out entirely, according to 
the report. 

Possible Community College 

In response to the Heald. llohson report 
the status of Venango Campus of Clarion 
State would be changed considerably. Venan- 
go in combination with the Titusville campus 
of the University of Pittsburgh and the War- 
ren campus of Edinboro State College would 
be converted into a community college. To 
justify this conversion the Heald, Hobson re- 
port makes several comments and recom- 
mendations. 

The report contends that cultural life of 
the area would be quickened by the pre- 
sence of a comprehensive community college. 
In response to tliis statement, faculty mem- 
bers and prominent figures of the town of 
Oil City have made the statement, "The ex- 
tent to which the existing branch campus 
has contributed to the cultural life of the 
area has added considerably to the com- 
munity." In the past, students of Venango 
Campus as members of the Venango Campus 
Choir have performed concerts for local or- 
ganizations. Venango Campus students and 
faculty members have participated in the 
Venango County Choral Society. The campus 
Philosophes, a discussion group, has present- 
ed many worthwhile discussions which are 
opened to the public at all times. The campus 
drama group puts on a theatrical presentation 
each semester. Venango campus facilities are 
used each week for non-credit adult educa- 
tion programs. These classes are open to 
any interested adult citizens of Oil City. 

The report next maintains that adult contin- 
uing education courses for credit would be 
available. This statement overlooks a few 
points. Over the past few years .some of 
the faculty members of Venango Campus 
have offered their services free for credit 
evening classes. The offer was turned down 
by Clarion State. Mrs. Sue Reinhardt, a Ven- 
ango faculty member and faculty advLsor 
to part-time students at Venango, stated, "Ol- 
der men and women are able to complete 
degrees or gain teacher certification through 
courses at Venango Campus.' 

Vo-Tech School Begun 

The refxjrt further contends that many 
of Venango County's youths and many more 
local industries' employee needs would be 
served by a community college. The main 
fault with this statement comes from the 
survey groups' complete overlooking of the 
new Oil City Vocational-Technical School. The 
new school is scheduled to open in September 
of the coming year and will serve the area 
of Venango and West Forest counties and 
the Titusville School District. The new school 
will be offering courses in: Appliance Repair, 
Auto Mechanic Parts Room, Autobody. Car- 
pentry. Building Maintenance, Machine Shop. 
Plumbing, Heating, Air Conditioning, Metal 
Fibercation, Welding, Electronics, Industrial 
Electricity. Drafting, Practical Nursing. Cos- 
metology, Food Service, Distributive Educa- 



tion and Warehouse. Typical community col- 
lege programs include cour.ses in: data pro- 
cessing, auto mechanics, printing, medical 
secretarial, legal secretarial, merchandising, 
rcstaiuant practice, cosmetology, drafting, 
and other skills for which tliere is employ- 
ment. If Venango Campus were replaced by 
a community college and offered a typical 
technical program, it would be competin.; 
with tlie new vocational-technical school. 

When local industry was confronted with 
the community college proposal, their reac- 
tions were not totally favorable. A commun- 
ity college program would enable students 
to obtain associate degrees in many areas. 
Personnel managers of ei^ht of the nine in- 
dustries of Oil City have stated that what 
indu.stries primarily need are men and wo- 
men with a B.S. degree. Heads of the Oil 
Well Division of the United States Steel Cor- 
poration, Strulhers Well's Corporation, Joy 
Manufacturing Company and Chicago Pne- 
umatic Tool Company have stated that they 
could use some personnel with associate de- 
grees in mechanical drafting and electronic 
technology; but other than those positions 
all of their employment needs can be met 
by persons with vocational-technical training 
or Bachelor of Science degrees. 

The Heald, Hob.son report commented that 
Vennngo's curriculum's placing too heavy 
an emphasis on teacher education does not 
serve the full interest of the community. 
The statement overlooked the fact that the 
curriculum at Venango Campus also in- 
cludes: liberal arts, humanities, natural sci- 
ences, social science, business admiiii.stra- 
tion, and a projected nursing education pro- 
gram. 

The report also makes statements concern- 
in t the percentage of Venango County stu- 
dents attending colleges. These statements 
are not totally true. The report states that 
only about 30 percent of Venango County 
High school graduates attend college. This 
is true. From recent studies done by the 
Venango Campus faculty and Venango Cam- 
pus advisory group committee, though, it has 
been found that 49 percent of the full and 
part-time student body are commuting stu- 
dents. The committee defines a commuting 
student as one who resides in Venango Coun- 
ty and adjacent counties and drives daily 
to class at Venango Campus. This figure 
is considerably different from the Heald, Hob- 
son figure of 19 percent. The third part of 
the comment suggests lowering the selectivity 
in admission policy. A practice such as this 
would lower the standard of Venango Cam- 
pus and it students. At present, Venango 
Campus has an alternate program. Mrs. Sue 
Reinhardt has commented on this by say- 
ing, "As advisor of part-time students at 
Venango Campus and as a former counselor 
at Oil City High School, I know that stu- 
dents who carmot meet full-time requirements 
are admitted as part-time students until they 
are able to handle a full-time load. Since 
they are taking courses at a branch campus 
of an accredited college, they can continue 
their work at the main campus. By lowering 
its standards, Venango Campus would quite 
possibly lose its accreditation and there- 
fore defeat its whole purpo.se. 

Local Opposition Commented On 

The report's final major comment directed 
toward Venango concerned local opposition. 
The report states that local opposition to 
a community college is based on cost and 
the erroneous belief that a community college 
is necessarily of poor quality. Academically 
the major complaint of a community college 
is transferring. The faculty-advisory commit- 
tee states, "Students entering transfer pro- 
grams in community colleges must either 
meet certain standards of admission or rem- 
edy their differences through remedial 
courses. Many have great difficulty in trans- 
ferring from one school to another and often 
lose credits and available time in the pro- 
cess. A comment made by Leonard Abate 
and Alistair Crawford, two of Venango's so- 
cial science instructors, concerning the aca 
demic deprivation of such a conversion as 
ad\ocated by the report was: "The conver- 
sion to a community college would take a 
school already successfully operated and re- 
move its accreditation, inter-library facilities 
and faculty." 



One trouble with the laws of the land is 
that most people think they were made for 
otlier people. 



Friday, December 13, 1968 



THE CALL — Clariop State College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



Page 7 



A PEEK AT GREEKS 



DELTA ZETA 

Pink roses and congratulations to our sis- 
ter, Marsha Kramerick, who was recently 
pinned to Joe Filia of Alpha Gamma Phi. 
pZs would like to thank all the townspeo- 
ple and students who helped make our Slave 
Day a success. 

Listen for the ringing voices of the sisters 
of Delta Zeta on Wednesday night. We shall 
be on campus Christmas caroling. Following 
our serenading, we will be entertained at 
the Big Sis-Little Sis party given by the 
pledges. Following three days of having a 
secret rose-buddy, during which each pledge 
receives a little gilt compliments of a sister 
unknown to the pledge, the pledge period 
will be ended with a party for the sisters. 
It is fun for the pledges and we are all 
looking forward to a good time. 

Delta Zetas will be timers at the swim 
meet on Saturday. Look for us in pink and 
green and holding stop watches! 

ALPHA SIGMA TAU 

The AT Pledges can breathe a sigh of 
relief with only one more week of pledging. 
Tonight, informal initiation will be held at 
Cook Forest— the theme being "a day in 
the life of an AST Pirate." On Monday, Jan. 
6, our seven pledges will be formally initiated 
as sisters. We'd like to thank all the frater- 
nities for their cooperation in supporting the 
"AST Fraternity of the Week." 

Yellow roses and AT love go to Sister 
Judy Thompson on her recent pinning to 
Ron Allaman. 

In harmony with Uic spirit of Riving at 
Christmas time, the ATs are each a "Se- 
cret Santa" to another sister. For one week 
before our party, the Santas do little favors 
for that particular sister. Their identities wiU 
bo revealed with a small gift at the party. 
Before the Christmas Party on Wednesday, 
Dec. 18, the Taus will help decorate the 
Christmas Tree at the Clarion Convalescent 
Home and will sing Christmas Carols to the 
residents. We hope to make their holiday 
happier. 

On Wednesday, we had our cultural pro- 



gram, at which the guest .speakers were 
members of the Clarion clergy. Our feelings 
concerning the season and spirit of Christmas 
was the topic of discussion. 

ALPHA GAMMA PHI ^ 

Alpha Gamma Phi welcomes their 22 new 
members. 

Congratulations to Joe Chalmers, who was 
again elected captain of this year's basket- 
ball team. Other starters, who are also bro- 
thers, arc George Lawry, Larry Kubovchik, 
and Bob Fusco. Also, three Gammas will 
provide the backbone of the wrestling team: 
State Champ Phil Detore, Bob Teagarden, 
and Ray Day. The Gammas plan to make 
trips to all of the away matches. 

The winner of the pledge raffle was Mr. 
Ernie Young of Ellwood City. The Gammas 
wish to thank all those who helped to make 
our raffle a success. 

From Monday to Friday, the fraternity will 
hold its annual Children's Hospital Fund 
drive. 

ALPHA CHI RHO 

Our new officers this year are: president, 
Gary Cox, vice president, H. Ray Hough, 
secretary, Harvey Hull, and treasurer, Lynn 
Kncpp. 

The brothers of the fraternity would like 
to extend their congratulations along with 
the pledgemastcr George Gdovic to the new 
pledges: Barry Gould, Tom Long, Bob Reigh- 
ard, Frank Larentis, Jim Bell, George Bills, 
Chuck Masceliino, Roland Sparrow, Buddy 
Martin, Cortez Puryear. Eugene Todeschini, 
Dick DeMarte, Bob Myers, Ray Weaver and 
Ed Schantz. 

We would Uke to extend our belated thanks 
to the sisters of Alpha Sigma Alpha for the 
cooperation in making our annual pledge- 
brother dinner a success again this year. 
Also, we would like the campus to note 
the new sign that marks the location of the 
house. 

ZETA TAU ALPHA 

The Zetas would like to thank social chair- 
man Sandy Artac and her assistant, Rose- 



I 



WRESTLING 

December 7— Quadrangular Tournament Home— 11 a.m. 

December 14 — Quadrangular Tournament Home — 1 p.m. 

(Indiana, Shippensburg, Slippery Rock) 

December 17 — Mansfield At Tyrone 

January 11 — Quadrangular Tournament At Cleveland 

(Dayton, Miami, Cleveland State) 

January 18— Bloomsburg Home— 8 p.m. 

January 28 — University of Pittsburgh -. Home — 8 p.m. 

February 1— Indiana Home— 2 p.m. 

February 5 — Edinboro Home — 2 p.m. 

February 8 — Lock Haven Away 

February 11 — California Away 

February 19 — Grove City Away 

February 22 — St. Francis Away 

February 28-March 1 — State College Tournament Clarion 

March 6-7-8— NAIA Tournament Omaha, Neb. 

March 20-21-22— NCAA Tournament Biigham Young 

Utah 

Home Freshman matches 1 hour before Varsity Match 



anne Bryer for a very successful dinner 
dance. It was held at the Hospitality Inn 
in Penn Hills. Congratulations to Ruth Hod- 
sen who received the Best Pledge Award 
at the dinner dance. 

Special thanks are extended to the students 
for their donations to the CARE project. ^- 
venty five dollars was sent to help needy 
children. 

PHI SIGMA KAPPA 

Nu Pentaton Chapter has acquired a mas- 
cot in the form of an eight-week puppy named 
Jason. It is possible that Jason will be on 
the scene at the Greek activities this spring. 

All the brothers extend their sympathy to 
the parents and family of Frank Lapponza, 
who died suddenly last week. Frank, a resi- 
dent of Clarion, had been living in the house 
since last summer. 

Phi Sigma Kappa's community Christmas 
project this year is to decorate a tree &t\A 
to sing carols at the convalescent home on 
Dec. 19. 

ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA 

The Alpha Sig pledges have finished their 
pledge period and have decided it was the 
sisters' turn for some fun. For "Turn About" 
day the sisters of Alpha Sigma Alpha were 
dressed as Santa Claus and carrying a bag 
of candy and gum. Nothing is too much for 
the pledges who seemed to have caught the 
Christmas spirit. 

However, the sisters are looking forward 
to Friday night for the informal initiation 
of the pledges; a night the pledges will not 
forget ! 

The sisters were pleased to have our Na- 
tional Traveling Secretary, Judy Holman here 
for five days. Her visit was enjoyed by all 
the sisters since she gave us some helpful 
suggestions. 

The Alpha Sigs would Uke to thank their 
advisers, Mrs. Bonner and Mrs. Kodrich, for 
planning a Christmas party next Thursday. 
The pledges will also be initiated that night. 

SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA 

Congratulations to Cheryl Bowser on her 
engagement to "Bo" Ross, Sigma Tau Gam- 
ma; to Linda Brown on her engagement to 
Bob Taylor, Bloomsburg State College; and 
to Dottie Lawry on her pinning to Art Tra- 
gesser, Sigma Tau Gamma. 

Cross Country 
Closes Season 
With 0-3 Record 

Cross country at Clarion State failed to 
make a good showing in its first season as 
a varsity sport, despite a bright pre-season 
outlook, but sophomore Jim Bell stood out 
as a real comer in the harrier ranks. 

Jim, who led the Clarion runners, placed 
second against Edinboro, fourth against In- 
diana, and third against California. The fl^et- 
footed sophomore placed 24th in the NAIA 
tourney and 34th in the State College Con- 
ftrence. 

In State College Conference competition, 
the team had 105 place points to the competi- 
tion's 68, giving them an 0-3 seasonal record. 

Running for the Clarion squad were Jim 
Bell, sophomore; Rick Barkley, junior; Phil 
Floyd, senior; Mike Flynn, sophomore; Larry 
Holly, senior; Tom Tessena, senior; and Scott 
Tieman, sophomore. 



A LETTER TO SANTA 

Christmastime Is 
A Joyous Season 

FEATURE ON CHRISTMAS 

Dear Santa, 

At this time of the year, I know you are 
busy filling many requests, but I hope you'll 
give my ideas some thought. 

Christmas is a joyous season, a happy 
season, a friendly season; it is a holiday 
to anticipate. It is a time when friends and 
relatives gather around the fireplace and 
reminisce about Christmases past. Storekeep- 
ers smile, streets are decorated in bright, 
cheery Christmas colors, and the sounds of 
"Merry Christmas" and "have a happy holi- 
day" can be heard everywhere. It is a univer- 
sal feeUng of joy and happiness, but is it 
really happy? 

Christmas is family gatherings, yet how 
many homes are without fathers, brothers, 
and sons, because of a war in a distant place. 
Will THEY have a merry Christmas? 

Christmas is a religious time for Christians; 
it is, as they believe, the anniversary of 
a time long ago when a baby boy was born 
to redeem the world. Yet Christmas is also 
exploited commercially. Buy this, buy that— 
thousands of people crowd into stores to buy 
gifts for everyone. Whatever happened to 
the old-fashioned times when people placed 
sentiment above monetary value? 

But are gifts the cnly important part of 
Christmas? I like gifts, both giving and re- 
ceiving them: yet Christmas means much 
more. Without world-wide peace and equality 
for all, tlie universal Christmas .spirit can 
only be superficial. 

So Santa, I'd Uke peace on earth and uni- 
versal brotherhood, not only at Christmas- 
time but all year around. With faith in our 
leaders and a practicing Chri.straas friend- 
liness throughout the year, we can celebrate 
and truly have an extra-merry Chri-stmas 

sooa. 

ThoughtfuUy, SUE FAIR 



FUTURE FLICKS! 



Continuing until next Tuesday at the Gar- 
by is the story of Ufe with "The Odd Couple," 
Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau. Bargain 
night Wednesday will be the John Wayne 
western "The Sons of Katie Elder." 

Thursday Peter Ustinov arrives with "Hot 
Millions," another super-crime movie. Play- 
ing at the Garby from Jan. 1 through 14, 



will be the most acclaimed movie of ' all 
time "Gone with the Wind." 

After Clint Eastwoods' poUce drama "Coo- 
gan's Bluff" leaves the Orpheum Saturday, 
the next movie will probably be Tommy 
Steele's "Half a Sixpence." However, watch 
the posters to be sure. 



MODERN DINER 

Where Friends Meet to Eat 



Enjoy Life . . . Eat Out Here Often 
We Are Always Open 

We Cater to the Family Cliildren Are Always Welcome 



CLARION 
DRY CLEANING CO. 

OFFERS YOU: 

• 1 Hour Dry Cleaning 

• Shirt Laundry • Tailoring 

• Formal Wear Rentals 

541 LIBERTY STREET CLARION 

PHONE 226-6121 

OPEN MON. . FRI. 'TIL 9 P.M. 

CLOSE SAT. AT 6 P.M. 



al 



Bubb's Matmen Open Season with Outstanding Victory 



Clarion's grapplers opened their 1968-69 sea- 
son in fine fashion last Saturday, giving up 
only two points to their tliree opponents in 
a quadrangular home tournament hosting 
Brockport State (N.Y.), Frostburg State 
(Md.) and Howard University, Washington, 
D.C. 

Coach Bob Bubb's matmen, amassing an 
amazing total of 124 talUes to two for the 
foes, would have shut out all opposition ex- 
cept for a tie registered in the unclassified 
category with Brockport. It was their first 
event in their new quarters at Waldo S. Tip- 
pin Gymnasium. 

An outstanding performer for the Golden 
Eagles was Captain Doug Niebel, who de- 
cisioned New York State champion Tom Bun- 
tich, 2-1, in the 160-pound class against Brock- 
port. Niebel score;d two faUs out of three 
matches. 

Reagan Beers, \yho scored the opposition's 
only two points in the entire tourney against 
Clarion's Gary Holsopplc in the unlimited 
class with Brockport, is also a New York 
£itate Champion. 



CSC Hun Judo Club 
Attends West Penn Meet 



Shortly before Thanksgiving the CSC Hun 
Judo Club attended an inter-coUegiate Wes- 
tern Pennsylvania meet. The other clubs 
which participated were Lock Haven State 
College — Teams I and II; Montclair; SUppery 
Rock State College — Teams I and II; George- 
town University; and Juniata CoUege. 

The CSC Hun Judo Club was represented 
by Joseph Kenny — purple belt, 120-pound, who 
won one lost two and tied one out of four 
games; Tom Komes — white belt, 195-pound, 
who with precision techniques won all four 
of his matches; Steve Jobb— purple belt, 116- 
pound who won two games and lost two; 
Duane Meirer — second brown belt, 140-pound, 
who had three wins and one loss; and Rick 
Jones — white belt, 160-pound with three ties 
and one loss. Rick Jones, though one of Cla- 
rion's novices fought very well. 

The CSC club quaUfied for the finals. How- 
ever the team was defeated by Lock Haven 
I and placed fifth in team effort. 



The trouble with most adults is that they 
think their school days have ended. 



MENI 

Now a watch 
that tells you 
who you are 

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IDENT 

Fashion 
Watch 




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Give your active man a Cara> 
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bracelet watch. Combines a 
precision 17 jewel movement 
with a rugged wide link bracelet 
and stainless steel back. And 
there's room on the plaque for 
his name or initials. 

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528 Main Street Clarion, Pa. 

Member AGS 



Fine showings were also made by Craig 
McClure, 145 pounds, with two falls out of 
three and Jack Riegel, 191 pounds, with two 
for three. 

The Golden Eagles scored 37 takedowns 
to one for the opponents. 



Tomorrow Clarion hosts another home 
quadrangular at 1 p.m. with Shippensburg, 
Slippery Rock and Indiana. 

In a 10 a.m. preliminary tomorrow, the 
JV and "B" teams will meet the Shippens- 
burg junior varsity. 





MERRY CHRISTMAS 


xLa. 


and 


^^B 


HAPPY NEW YEAR! 


To Everyone at Clarion State CoUege 


v^Pj/ 


frotn 


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TOWN & COUNTRY 1-HR. & 4-HR. 


• 


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If it's good grooming 
he's after.. . 
go after him with 
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British Sterling. An exclusive masculine fra- 
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Sign now for Our FREE GIFTS to 
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Page 8 




GOLDEN EAGLE CAPTAIN Joe Chalmers (10) attempts a toul shot as both 
Clarion and Walsh get set for a rebound. 



Cage Team Wins 3 Games, 
Shows Much Improvement 



Clarion State and Walsh College went into 
overtime Monday, Dec. 4, in a hard fought 
floor fray that saw the Golden Eagles come 
out on top, 85-79. 

Neither team scored until more than two 
minutes of the initial contest in Clarion's 
new Waldo S. Tippin Gymnasium, but the 
pace quickened with the Eagles holding a 
42-38 halitime edge. The Canton, Ohio cagers 
came on strong from an underdog rating 
witli the score remaining close most of the 
way. 

With the board showing 75-75 as the clock 
ran out, Coach John Joy's quintet made good 
use of the extra minutes as George Lawry, 
Buddy Martin and Dennis Luce accounted 
for the final tallies. 

Sharing top scoring honors for Clarion were 
George I^awry and Larry Kubovchick, who 
dumped in 18 apiece. Captain Joe Chalmers 
was a close second with 17. 

Charles Collier was the leading hoopster 
for the Walshmen, swishing the net for 28. 

Clarion's freshmen topped the Ohioans, 92- 
74, in the preliminary. 

CLARION FG FP TP 

J. Chalmers 6 5 17 

L. Kubovchick 9 18 

B. Martin .'.'....'.'.*...'...'. 6 4 16 

G. Lawry 9 18 

D. Luce , 2 3 7 

B. Fusco .'. 2 4 8 

J. Park .., Oil 

Totals ;.!.... 34 17 85 

WALSH FG FP TP 

J. Eaton 3 17 

B. Polinsky ,.....; 2 5 9 

C. Collier ,... i 11 6 28 

S. Snopel 6 8 20 

R. Venuto ....! 2 6 10 

0. Stewart 2 4 

L Roman Oil 

Totals 26 27 79 

Clarion downed Slippery Rock, 68-61, on 
the Rockets' home hardwood last Saturday 
to give Coach John Joy's cagers their second 
win in as many starts. 

The junior varsity also won their second 
of two outings by a 63-60 score. 

Clarion's Captain Joe Chalmers was high 
scorer for the Eagles with 21, in a slow- 
starting contest that saw both teams playing 
a tight defense. 

Although the Eagles remained ahead most 
of the game, the margin remained one or 
two points until late in the fray when they 
pulled away only to have the Rockets close 
the gap again until the final minutes when 
the closing seven-point lead was attained. 

Larry Kubovchick, Buddy Martin and 
George Lawry led in the rebound column 
with eight apiece. 

Only five fouls were called on Clarion 
against 16 for the Rockets. 

Mack Lee paced the Rocket scoring wilii 
16. 

CLARION ' FG FP TP 

J. Chalmers .:. '^ 6 9 21 

L. Kubovchick '. 6 4 16 

R.Martin 5 2 12 

D. Luce 3 17 

G. Lawry 3 6 

J. Park ' 3 6 

Totals 26 16 68 

SLIPPERY ROCK FG FP TP 

T Schnorr ^ 7 14 

B. Barlett 3 17 

R. Inman 2 4 

J. Vaslowski 2 4 

M. Lee 8 16 

G. Neuschwander ^ 6 12 

L. Deemer 12 4 

Totals 29 3 61 



CHIKOSKY'S 
PHARMACY 

BONNE BELL 
COTY 

Cosmetics 

RUSSELL STOVER 

Candiea 

Clarion 226-8450 



The Clarion State cagers racked up their 
third win of the season Monday night by 
defeating Geneva College, 59-47, in a slow- 
starting contest marked by tight defensive 
play. 

Clarion's freshmen trounced the Geneva 
freshmen 87-67 in the preliminary. 

Buddy Martin paced the Golden Eagles 
with 20 points, ten of them coming from 
12 trips to the foul line to make the real 
margin of difference in a game showing a 
half-time score of 20-15 in favor of Clarion. 

Field goals in the contest totaled 21 for 
the Golden Eagles and 20 for the Golden 
Tornadoes. 

Big John Park, 6' 9", turned in a great 
performance under the hoop, with 12 re- 
bounds and ten points. 

Don Sheffield sparked Coach Cliff Ault- 
man's charges with 14 tallies. The Golden 
Tornadoes now stand at 1-3 on the season. 

With a 3-0 record. Coach John Joy's quintet 
met Alliance College in Cambridge Springs 
Wednesday. Tonight they host last year's lea- 
gue leading Fighting Scots of Edinboro. 

CLARION FG FP TP 

J. Chalmers 4 8 

L. Kubovchick 3 5 11 

G. Lawry 4 8 

R. Martin 5 10 20 

D. Luce 1 2 

J. Park 4 2 10 

Totals 21 17 59 

GENEVA FG FP TP 

J. O'Neill 4 19 

D. Sheffield 6 2 14 

R. Coleman Oil 

D. Hopper 6 1 13 

J. Auitnian 2 4 

D. De Carlo 2 2 6 

Totals 20 7 47 

2!\D IIS SERIES 

Buddy Martin 

•I 

Averages 14 




Robert "Buddy " Martin, is a 6-foot, 170- 
pound guard from Sharon High School, where 
he starred in basketball for three years. 
Buddy, wearing Number 12, is one of the 
starters returning from last year's varsity 
squad; he had a 14-point per game average. 

Upon graduation. Buddy, who is presently 
a junior majoring in Psychology, would like 
to continue his education in tlie field of 
vocational rehabilitation and counseling, be- 
cause he "enjoys working with and helping 
people." 

In addition to basketball. Buddy enjoys 
hunting and sports car racing; he also loves 
to listen to jazz. 

So far this sea.son. Buddy has scored IG 
points in Clarion's 85-79 victory over Walsh 
College, and 12 points in the Slippery Rock 
contest. In the 57-49 victory over Geneva 
last Monday night. Buddy was high scorer 
with 20 points. 



Every great advance in science has issued 
from a new audacity of imagination. — John 
Dewey, 

Do you ever stop to think how bad the situ- 
ation would be if everyone agreed with you? 



THE CALL — Cla rion State College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 

Basketball Team Faces 
Tough Contest Tonight 



Coach John Joy's cagers wind up a hectic 
week of basketball tonight against the Fight- 
ing Scots of Edinboro in Tippin Gym 

While the Scots have lost 6' 9 " Mick Unick 
and (i" 7 " Jim Mann, their bench shows .seven 
lettermcn back from la.st .season's Western 
Division champions;hip team, the best in the 
history of the college. 

Add another returnee from two years ago 
to the Edinboro roster, and the Scots stack 
up as a formidable force. 

Senior letterman Frank Smith, 6' 2", NATA 
All American and a ♦ri-captain with Harry 
Jenkins rnc' Ron Weaver, scored a dazzling 
42 points in the Scots' win over Lock Haven 
last week and has been a leading threat 
on Coach Jim McDonald's squad throughout 
his collegiate career. 

Jenkins, NAIA District 18 Honorable Men- 
tion winner, as well as Weaver, Tim Ziner 
and Brookville's Larry Smith add some real- 
muscle to the senior ranks. 

Coach John Joy, with his assistants Tom 
Beck and Stan Hallman, have some strong 



men of their .own to pit against the Scots. 
Buddy Martin, 6' " junior, is emerging as 
a real power for the Eagles. The speedv 
baU handler has accounted for 48 {x>ints in 
the first three encounters, 16 of them at 
the foul line. He is a leading rebounder and 
plays a tonsistently good defensive game. 

Captain Joe Chalmers, 5' 8", belies his 
status as the smallest man on the squad 
with his fine shooting and defensive work. 
He amassed 46 points in the first three starts. 

Larry Kubovchick, 6' 1" senior, has netted 
45 tallies in the first three. Ho is making 
a strong comeback after silting out his junior 
year on an iniracLion. 

Performing in line fashion are Dennis Luce, 
5' 11 ' junior, All State honorable mention 
last year; George Lawry, 6' 4" junior, a 
consi.stcnt good shooter and fine defensive 
player; Bob Fusco, 6' 3 " senior and former 
All Stater who also sat out last year on 
an infraction, and towering John Park, 6' 9" 
.sophomore, who is really coming into his 
own under the hoop. 



CSC Hosts H.S. Swimming Meet 



Tomorrow, Tippin Gym will host a swim- 
ming and diving meet for 11 teams; these 
teams are all high schools represented in 
the W.P.LA.L. 

The high schools in the competition will 
be: Baldwin, BeUe Vernon, Burrell, Gateway, 
Charleroi, McKecsport, Norwin, Penn Hills, 
Riverside, Seneca, and Kiski Area. 

There will be 23 divers and 195 swimmers 
plus coaches and managers. A total of 340 
people are expected. 

Diving will begin at 10 a.m., with each 
of the 23 divers doing 10 dives. The five 
required dives will be: front, back, reverse, 
inward, and twist with five optional dives 
decided by the individual divers. The option 
dives will be a personal variation from each 
of the required categories. 

During the diving events the swimmers 
will be given a tour of the campus and 
a training-table lunch at Chandler. 

Swimming warmups will begin at noon. 
Swimming competition will run from 1 to 



5 p.m. During this time the divers will go 
to lunch and be given a tour of the campus. 
Swimming will have 14 events with four 
or five heats per event. The swimming events 
are as follows: 

I. One-meter dive; 

2. 200-yard medley relay; 

3. 200-yard free style; 

4. 200-yard butterfly; 

5. 50-yard free-style; 

6. 200-yard backstroke: 

7. 200-yard individual medley; 

8. 100-yard butterfly; 

9. 200-yard breast stroke; 
10. 100-yard freestyle; 

II. 100-yard backstroke; 

12. 400-yard free-style; 

13. 100-yard breast stroke; 

14. 400-yard free-style relay. 

The meet will provide Clarion swimming 

coaches with a chance to scout for college 
prospects. 




CLARION'S BOB FUSCO (52) and Walsh's Collier (33) reach for the jump 
ball as George Lawry (30) and Joe Chalmers (10) wait for the tip-off. 



Cagers Participate in Tournaments, 
Leave Tomorrow for Troy, Alabama 



Within the next three weeks, Clarion's bas- 
ketball team, coached by John Joy, will 
participate in two toumments. 

The team leaves tomorrow for a tourna- 
ment at Troy State College in Troy, Ala- 
bama. Invited two years ago to Uiis tourna- 
ment, Clarion was unable to attend, due 
to a prior commitment with Edinboro. Troy 
State, which schedules a year in advance, 
offered the team a raincheck, which they 
accepted. 

On Monday night. Clarion will pit its 
strength against the host team, Troy; Ohio 
Northern University will play Bethel College 
of Tennessee. Tuesday night will be the 
consolation and final rounds. While in Troy, 
the team will stay at the Branding Iron 
Motel; they will return Wednesday. 



Ir preparation for the Indiana Christmas 
Tournament on December 27th and 28th, the 
team will return to Clarion on the 26th for 
two practice sessions. 

In addition to Clarion, Indiana has in- 
vited Point Park College from Pittsburgh and 
John F. Kennedy College in Nebraska. 

Although their vacations wUl be interrupt- 
ed, the team, according to Assistant Coach 
Thomas Beck, is quite enthusiastic about the 
tournaments and is looking forward to them. 
Mr. Beck feels that these tournaments are 
great morale boosters and give the team a 
chance to plav good solid teams from dif- 
ferent areas of the country. He also pointed 
out that, without the Indiana tournament, 
there would be a long lay-off between games. 



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Friday, December 13, 1968 




BUDDY MARTIN (12) stretches for the rebound, guarded closely by Chuck 
Collier (33) and Stan Snopel (13). 



Clarion Joins Athletic Conference 

Clarion will become a member of the Eas- Saturday, December 12, 13, and 14, at which 

tern Colleges Athletic Conference at the or- formal installation will be made, 
ganization's convention in New York City t,. r^r^./-. ■ n 

this week ECAC is an all-sports conference in-. 

Athletic Director Frank Lignelli is repre- '''"'1'"^' '" ^hoir mcmhcrship most major col- 

senting the college at the conference in the I'^Ses and universities in the Ea.stern United 

Manhattan Hotel on Thursday, Friday, and States. 



— FREE i- 

Student Gift Pacs 

(Men's and Women's) 

— STARTING MONDAY — 

College Book Store 



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College Book Store 



Union is Formally Dedicated; 
Building is Dedicated for the 
'Enjoyment' of CSC Community 



Harvey Hall Student Union at Clarion was 
formally dedicated December 16 with a rib- 
bon cutting ceremony and dedicatory re- 
marks by students and faculty. 

Tom PaoUno, student senate president and 
member of the Student Union Board, served 
as master of ceremonies and introduced John 
Domenick, student senate past president, 
who spearheaded several years of effort to- 
ward establishing the faciUty. Domenick re- 
counted some of the spadework that brought 
the project into being. 

Speaking for President James Gemmell. 
Dr. Roger Hufford, professor of speech at 
the college, said he was "happy to see the 
fine results of the labor of those who have 
put in so much time and effort in the past." 

"This is jUvSt the beginning. We are going 
on from here, " Dr. Hufford concluded in 
reference to a new Student Union building 
to be built by the General State Authority 
on the Clarion campus in the near future. 



Owen Winters, student union board chair- 
man, cut a ribbon dedicating the building 
"to the enjoyment and use of the entire col- 
lege family." 

"Just a year ago the Student Union Board 
came into being. Now the results of our 
work go before the .students, who are the 
ultimate authority," he said. 

Also present at the ceremony were Clarion 
Board of Trustees President H. Ray Pope, 
Jr., and Mrs. Pope, 

Informally opened Nov. '21, the former 
Frank L. Harvey Gymnasium, completed in 
1931, was remodeled at an approximate co.st 
of $60,000. Including a lounge, billiards room 
and a balcony-type area for table games, 
the new facilities were created by subdividing 
and redecorating the former gymnasium ar- 
ea. 

The snack bar on the lower level, now 
in use for several years, has also been re- 
modeled. 



Chamber Music is Heard, Wednesday 
Performance is Termed 'VitaF 



By ROBERT VAN METER 
Professor of Music 

An enthusiastic and appreciative audience 
Wednesday evening enjoyed a concert of 
chamber music presented by staff members 
of the Department of Music. The program 
was remarkable for the quality and variety 
of the music performed, and the artistic fin- 
ish of the performances. 

The Trio in B-Qat, opus 11, by Beethoven, 
played by Christian Bohlen, clarinet; Vahe 
Berberian, cello; and Bong Hi Kim, piano, 
was a delightful confirmation of the sheer 
listening pleasure inherent in fine chamber 
music; the individuality of instrumental char- 
acter combined in richly designed counter- 
point. 

Mr. Bohlen's clarinet spoke with glowing 
warmth and beauty of tone. His playing was 
faultlessly shaded and explicitly phrased. Mr. 
Berberian's cello tone was both rich and 
transparent. Mrs. Kim played with fluency 
and with complete sensitivity to the possi- 
bilities of nuance, color and articulation of- 
fered by this interesting and seldom per- 
formed work. 

The Mendelssohn Trio in C minor, opus 
66, for violin, cello and piano, wns heard 
for the first time by this reviewer, and, I 
suspect, by most of the audience present, 
as well. The experience offered a new dis- 
covery in sound. It was a vital performance 
which posses.sed both vigor and nostalgia. 
The music — dark, brooding, and impassioned 
— was played with a broad sweep, pulsating 
with energy, yet fully revealing the intricate 
detail of each individual phrase. 



Mendelssohn in this work has combined 
a classic interest in clarity, harmony and 
balance of structural design with youthful 
and passionate expression of the ardent 
yearning of romanticism. This trio exists as 
an entity, a work which demands ensemble 
of the highest order in which the manifest 
talents of three players are combined in syn- 
chronized unitj' of purpose and propulsion. 
David Mallory, vioUnist, Vahe Berberian, cel- 
list, and Annette Roussel-Pesche, pianist, 
demonstrated individual instrumental com- 
mand and collective insight that fully enter 
the realm of artistry. 

The Trio in E-flat, opus 40, by Brahms 
was performed by Burton Hardin, French 
horn, David MaUory, violin, and Bong Hi 
Kim, piano. Their conception of this work 
estabUshed a mood of introspection and re- 
flection, lyrical rather than essentially dra- 
matic. Although the first movement offered 
the possibility of more compelling climaxes, 
the dramatic element was strongly intensi- 
fied in the vigorous cherzo with its haunting, 
almost terrifying middle section. 

Fascinating are the various colors which 
can be imparted to the tone of the French 
horn, the most romantic of the brass instru- 
ments, perhaps also the most demanding and 
difficult in performance techniques. Mr. Har- 
din explores at will its tonal resources and 
dynamic range. Although the horn Is noted 
for its ability to blend well with woodwind, 
brass or string sonorities, the achievement 
of perfect balance with the sonority of the 
piano still poses problems for this most flexi- 
ble and congenial brass participant in the 
chamber music ensemble. 



Faculty Changes Will Occur 
For Second Semester; Seven 
Profs Take Sabbatical Leaves 



When the second semester starts in the 
last week of January, there will be several 
faculty changes: Seven members of the fac- 
ulty will take sabbatical leave for the semes- 
ter. There will be three new faculty mem- 
bers, and there will be five temporary re- 
placements for those granted leave. 

In addition, one Clarion faculty member 
will return from leave; Miss Mary Kay Ban- 
ner, assistant professor in the laboratory 
school. 



/ 



* Pennsylvania Conference ' 

Athletic Conference 
Streamlines Title 

A new year brought a new name to the 
former Ponns.vlvania State Colleges Athletic 
Conference. The 13-state colleges will here- 
after be known simply as the Penn.sylvania 
Conference. 

The Board of Presidents approved the shoP 
ter name proposed by the conference athle- 
tic directors at their semi annual meeting 
after officials concurred that the streamlined 
title would be easier to use in newspapers 
and other publicity. 

Clarion State College is in the Western 
Divison of the conference which also includes 
California, Lock Haven, Slippery Rock, Edin- 
boro, and Shippensburg. In the Eastern Divi- 
sion are Mansfield. Bloomsburg, Cheyney, 
East Stroudsburg, Kutztown, Millersville and 
West Chester. 

Clarion was one of seven Pennsylvania Con- 
ference members recently admitted to the 
Eastern Colleges Athletic Conference, bring- 
ing to ten the number in the Pennsylvania 
Conference. 

In other action, the conference ratified a 
new constitution modelled after that of the 
ECAC, but with tighter restrictions in some 
areas. 



Those who have been granted sabbatical 
leave for the second semester are: 

Mr. Bob H. Copeland, associate professor 
of speech. 

Dr. Bruce H. Dinsmorc, professor of bio- 
logy and head of the department. 

Mr. Edward G. Duffy, associate professor 
of history. 

Mr. Edward S. Grejda, associate profes- 
sor of Enghsh. 

Mr. William M. McDonald, associate pro- 
fessor of music. 

Dr. Elbert R. Moses, professor of speech 
and head of the department. 

Mr. Charles G. Pearce, assistant professor 
of art. 

Teaching replacements for tlie second sem- 
ester are; 

Mrs. Janet Berberian, temporary instructor 
of music, replacing Mr. McDonald. 

Mrs. Phyllis F. Grosch, temporarj- in.struc- 
tor of art, replacing Mr. Pearce. 

Mr. Jon A. McClure, temporary instructor 
of speech, replacing Dr. Moses. 

Mrs. Ruth S. Van Meter, temporary assis- 
tant professor of histor.v, replacing Mr. Duffy. 

Mrs. Twila M. Wollaston, temporary in- 
structor of English, replacing Mr. Grejda. 

The new additions to the faculty are; 

Miss Karen King, instructor of health and 
physical education. 

Mrs. Joan C. Lauderbach, provisional as- 
sistant professor of library science. 

Mr. Glenn L. Sitzman. associate librarian. 



Sympathy to Family 

On behalf of the students, faculty, and ad- 
ministration, the Clarion Call staff would 
like to extend deep sympathy to the family 
and friends of Judy Miller, class of 1968, 
who died during Christmas vacation follow- 
ing a lingering illness. 



Clarion Call 



Vol. 40, No. 11 



CLARION STATE COLLEGE — CLARION, PENNSYLVANIA 



Friday, January 10, 1969 



GEOnaE HARMON IS CHAIRMAN 



Fraternity Members Solicit 

Funds for Children's Hospital Disciplinary Board is Announced; 

Four Students^ Four From Faculty 
Will Serve on All-College Group 




PICTURED ABOVE are members of Alpha Gamma Phi who participated 
in the Children's Hospital Fund Drive. From left to right are Andy Brind- 
ger, Bill Wingard, Russell Perry, Bill Botti, Leo Valasek, and Danny Walo- 
vich. 



The president's newly-appointed committee 
to study disciplinary procedures was sche- 
duled to have its lirst meeting yesterday 
(Thursday). 

Appointment of the all-colle«e committee, 
consisting of four students and four faculty 
members, was announced on Tuesday by Pre- 
.sident .James Gemmell. Two ton.sultants were 
al.so api>ointed to assist the committee, whii-h 
has been asked to recommend appropriate 
changes in present procedures to assure the 
observance by the college of fundamental 
principles of due process of law. 

Chairman of the new committee is George 
Harmon, professor of biology. The other fa- 
culty members are Tracy Buckwaltcr, profes- 
sor of geology; Emmett Graybill, assistant 
professor of political science; and Mary 
Hardwick, associate professor of speech. 

The student members are: George Hall, 
sophomore majoring in speech and theater; 
Dorothy J. Lawry, junior majoring in speech 



Gammas Sponsor Fund Drive; 
$264 is Donated to Hospital 



During the three weeks prior to the Christ- 
mas recess, the brothers of Alpha Gamma 
Phi Fraternity sponsored their annual fund 
drive for Children's Hospital in Pittsburgh. 

Centrally located in the lobby of Peirce 
Science Center, the brothers asked for dona- 



tions from students and faculty. 

This year the Gammas collected $204 which 
Dan Walovich and Carl De Riggi, two of 
the members, took to Station KDKA on Dec. 
22, where it was added to the general Chil- 
dren's Hospital Fund. 



Freezing Temperatures Cause 
Power F'ailures on Campus 



The freezing temperatures of the past few 
weeks has been the cause of another series 
of blackouts at Clarion. The first blackout 
was on Christmas night. The power was back 
in temporary service, however, until the 
storm on Saturday, Dec. 28. At 3:45, the 
power was out again, due to water which 
got around the high voltage electric wires. 
This time, power was not restored until the 
evening of Dec. 30. The power was again 
out from Tuesday morning, Dec. 31, until 
Wednesday afternoon. It has been kept in 
operation except for the short time it was 
turned off on Monday in order to make re- 
pairs. 

In Peirce Hall, 400 brook trout suffered 
from lack of air during the failure, although 
none died. Some refrigerated micro-organ- 
isms were lost, but the amount lost has not 
been disclosed. Chipmunks in the lab were 
defrosted, but have been refrozen. Some or- 
ganisms in the instant ocean perished due 
to lack of oxygen. In the greenhouse, a num- 
ber of exotic plants died from the loss of 
heat. The man hours in research which were 
wasted cannot be counted. 

Previous power failures have been caused 
by improper drainage. West Penn Power sup- 
plied emergency power throughout the period 



CSC Is Awarded 
National Grant 

Clarion has been awarded anotlicr National 
Science Foundation grant to conduct a sum- 
mer program in Field Archaeology, accord- 
ing to Dr. Gustav A. Konitzky who will serve 
as prosram director. 

Dr. Konitzky, who is professor of Anthro- 
pology at Clarion and in charge of the col- 
leges archaeological field program, re- 
marked that this grant will bring 3,5 selected 
students to Clarion for a six-week summer 
institute in field archaeology. 

"This program will be independent from 
Clarion's annual Archaeological Field School 
for college undergraduates," Dr. Konitzky 
stated. 

"We expect heavy competition for the avail- 
able 35 places in the program, since any 
outstanding high school .student in the 11th 
and 12th grade in any school in the country 
has the right to apply " 

Last year's institute resulted in 822 appli- 
cations mailed from which a faculty .selec- 
tion committee screened 31 applicants for 
admission to the program. The students re- 
presented 23 states, the District of Columbia 
and Mexico. 



of blackouts. The present electrical system 
is owned and was installed by the state. 
It carries 12,000 volts, and is maintained 
by West Penn Power. The whole system is 
in need of a major overhauling for prevention 
of further power failures. 

Reading Council 
Will Be Formed 
On Wednesday 

Some 40 public school administrators, .sup- 
ervisors and classroom teachers from Cla- 
rion, Forest. Jefferson, and Venango coun- 
ties will meet at Clarion State Wednesday, 
to organize a local council of the Internation- 
al Reading Association. 

The organizational meeting is being held 

in the Chandler Dining Hall at 7:30 p m. 

under the direction of the staff of the Ele- 
mentary Education Department. 

The purpose of the council w ill bo to focus 
attention on reading instruction with regard 
to the latest research, instructional proced- 
ures, and program development. 

Officers will be elected, committees will 
be appointed to carry out tho council's pro- 
gram, and steps will be taken to plan the 
first meeting of the council in April. 

The initial meeting is open to any public 
school personnel interested in reading. All 
those interested may register their intention 
to attend by contacting David H. Klindienst, 
at the training school. 

Directing tho meeting will be Walter Kou- 
kal. associate professor of elementary educa- 
tion. Dr. Betty Slater is in charge of facilit- 
ies and refreshment. Drs. Phyllis Smith and 
Arnold Zaeske have a.ssistod with planning. 



'.VO EXir IS GIVEN 

Play Termed 
'Successful' 

By JUDY CROSS 

The function of the performing arts is inter- 
pretation. The function of drama is either 
to entertain or instruct, although both goals 
can be achieved at the same time. Last 
night four College Readers, under the capable 
guidance of Dr. Mary Hardwick', presented 
No Exit by John Paul Sartre. They sucess- 
fuUy combined interpretation, entertainment, 
and instruction to give the audience a fine 
performance. 

Sartre's play was skillfully interpreted by 
all four readers. Paul Gaffney, a freshman, 
was seen as the valet. Although his role 
was small, he will undoubtedly be seen often 
in the future in Clarion's dramatic produc- 
tions. 

George Hall aptly played Garcin and was 
responsible for many electrifying moments. 
However, he occasionally let his usually effec- 
tive sardonic laughter become forced and 
false. 

Connie Carter was a magnificent Inez. She 
discreetly and lucidly displayed the nature 
of her character. Her physical contact with 
Estelle was delicate and believable, but not 
overdone. Throughout, Connie's intense emo- 
tional contact with the other characters and 
her splendid stage presence made her a very 
real Inez. 

Comic relief in the character of Estelle 
was a delight as presented by Suzan Albanesi. 
who was more concerned about the lack of 
a mirror in which to sec herself than about 
her new residence. Estelle was not recognized 
for profound thoughts, and the humor often 
came from incidents of her vanity. 

Although their characterizations were, for 
the most part, consistently believable, the 
audience may have unfortunately been dis- 
tressed by too many occa.sions when they 
had to strain to hoar what the Readers were 
saying. 

To some No Exit was surprisingly a very 
funny play. However, the laughter was often 
nervous and choked by the realization that 
"Hell is other people," is not a laughing 
matter. 

Certainly No Exit can easily be found to 
bo amusing, but it is equally thought provok- 
ing. During a discussion which followed the 
play, many questions and answers about the 
moaning of the play served to promote the in- 
tellectual merits of the play. Naturally, the 
discussion centered on Sartre's philosophy and 
what he was trying to say in No Exit. Among 
many possible answers, the mo.st pertinent 
point Sartre was trying to make seemed to 
be: "Man only finds his identity in terms 
of his action. He is not what he says, but 
what he does. ' 



Christie-Murray Visits Clarion 



David Christie-Murray, former associate 
professor of F^nglish at Clarion, recently re- 
turned to renew the many acquaintances he 
made while teaching here. He is presently 
a Ma.ster at Harrow vSchool in England. He 
has continued creating D. C.-M.s". the witty 
rhymes he began writing for the Call last 
year. These short poems ar« now being pub- 
lished in The Harrovian, Harrow's school pa- 
per. 



Mr. Christie Murray is continuing his liter- 
ary work as well as his teaching. His two 
older daughters. Ann and Allison, arc pre- 
sently active in drama, and Susan, his .voung 
est, is participating in athletic comjwtition 
at her .school. 

Mr. Christie-Murray was in America from 
Dec. 9 to 23. during which time he was 
honored at several social events While in 
Clarion, he stayed with Dr. Robin Wilson, 
professor of English, and Mrs. Wilson. 



pathology and audiology; Susan J. Kiddle, 
,)unior ma,joring ui library science; and Wil- 
liam L. Santee, junior majoring in English 
( secondary education ) . 

Tho two consultants are Allen R. Elliott, 
dean of student affairs, and 11. Wallace Brew- 
ster, special assistant to the president and 
a specialist in public law. 

According to Professor Harmon, yester- 
day's meeting was expected to be devoted 
to organizational matters. In general, the 
committee expects to set u;) procedures to 
be used in cases involving student discipline 
and to act as a committee of review if a 
student makes an appeal. 

Clarion Freshmen 
Win Fifth Plaee 
Debate Trophy 

Two Clarion freshmen won the fifth |)lacc 
debate trophy in a varsity tournament at 
Scranton University last weekend. 

Rebecca Kasper and Lilhan Pfaff achieved 
the honor in competition with 20 varsity teams 
from four states. Their record was 42 in 
a switch-sides, power matched competition. 

Due to an error in tabulations, the trophy 
was awarded to St. Johns of Jamaica. Follow- 
ing the discovery of the error, the hosts 
from Scranton decided to award a duplicate 
trophy to Clarion in the near future. 

Three other teams of novice debaters com- 
piled undefeated records in no\ ice competi- 
tion at Clarion the same weekend. 

The top affirmative team at the Clarion 
tournament was Bob Banks of Ambridge and 
Frank Falso of Coraopolis. These two Clarion 
novices had a 3-1 record, with wins over 
SUppery Rock A and B and Pitt at Johnstown, 
and a single loss to Geneva. 

Banks and Falso were teamed with Carra- 
way and Schultheiss, and their combined 7 1 
record was good enough for first place in 
the seven-team tournament at Clarion. As 
Clarion was ineligible for awards at their 
own tournament, the trophy went to Geneva 
College, the \isiting school with the best win- 
loss record. 

Alan Carraway was the lop individual 
speaker in the tournament with 8.5 quality 
points. Barry McCauliff of Clarion was .second 
with 7, Jim Rarick of Clarion was third with 
5, and Judy McAuley of Clarion was fourth 
with 3.33. 

'Sequelle' Needs 
Names of Seniors 

The 1969 Sequelle will cover the entire 19- 
68-69 school year. Because of the length of 
time involved, all Sequellcs will be mailed 
to seniors. Please write .vour name and com 
plete home address on a piece of paper and 
return it to the Sequelle office by Jan. 28. 



Calendar of 
Coming Events 

SATURDAY, J.^Nl'ARV it 

—Basketball: CSC vs. Fredonia (av\ay) 

—Wrestling: Quadrangular Meet (Cleveland 
State) 
SUNDAY. JANUARY 12 

—Movie; "Our Daily Bread." Chapel. 8 p.m. 
.MONDAY, JANUARY 13-17 

— Finals 
SATURDAY, J.\NU.4RY 18 

— F'inals 

—Basketball: CSC vs. Bloomsburg (away) 

—Wrestling: CSC vs. Bloomsburg, Gym, 
8 p.m. 

—Dance: Gym Balcony. 8:30 p.m. 
SUNDAY, JANUARY' 19 

—Movie: "Fahrenheit 451. " Chapel. 8 p.m. 
TUESDAY. JANUARY 21 

—End of P'irst Semester 
iMONDAY, JANUARY 27 

—Basketball: CSC vs. Slippery Rock, home, 
8:15 p.m. 

— Registration for Second Semester 
TUESDAY, JANUARY 28 

—Wrestling: CSC vs. University of Pitts- 
burgh, home, 8 p.m. 

— Registration 
WEDNESDAY. JAIN^ARY 29 

— Clas.ses Begin 
FRIDAY. JANUARY' M 

— Rifle Allrgbeny (away < 



lAM^i^i^ 



n^Ai^^^i^^iA**^^ 



Page 2 



Editorially 
Speaking 

Pass-Fail System — 
Is it Worthwhile? 



It is mid-January and the students 
of Clarion again find themselves facing 
the battery of final exams. Books that 
are dusty from weeks of lying on the 
shelf are taken down and opened. 
Cofi'ee, No-Doz. and aspirin are in 
great demand while many dormitory 
lights buin thioughout the early hours 
of morning. Students with red, road- 
map eyes stumble from class to class 
and from test to test wondering when 
the day will end. And the goal of this 
exhausting effort is simply to earn a 
grade. 

This time of year also brings many 
conjectures about the worth of testing 
and grading. Many people in colleges 
aiid universities throughout the nation 
are in favor of dropping the examina- 
tion and grading method for some 
other system such as a pass-fail sys- 
tem. This system would combine the 
excellent students and the mediocre 
students into a single group while do- 
ing the same to the poor and failing 
students. 

Perhaps the rigors of final exam- 
inations and the sometimes unpleasant 
results of them prejudice the student 
against the grading system. And per- 
haps there is some justification in criti- 
cizing this method of measuring aca- 
demic success. But a measuring in- 
strument should be as accurate as pos- 
sible. And dividing the scale into the 
five parts, A-B-C-D-E, seems to tell a 
more complete story than the pass-fail 
division. And what is better for de- 
termining a student's rank oft' the gl*£id'e 
scale than the test? 

Aside from the point of accuracy 
in determining a student's success, 
there is also the problem of creating an 



incentive. To be sure the diploma is 
an incentive to the student as is the 
prospect of higher social status, better 
job opportunities and last but not least, 
higher salaries. But the grade is also 
an incentive and it is an immediate re- 
ward and not deferred as are the oth- 
ers mentioned. The student who 
strives for the "A" by putting forth 
great effort is proud of his accomplish- 
ment. By taking away his "A" and 
placing him in the passing group with 
other students who have exerted less 
effort, we would be taking away his 
distinction. And many students would 
decrease their efforts knowing that 
they will be in the passing group whe- 
ther they do excellent or mediocre 
work. 

Finally the grading scale gives the 
benefit of the doubt to the poor stu- 
dent. Although a student may not de- 
serve to pass a course, he may have 
derived some benefit from it. In this 
case the student should receive a "D", 
and therefore get some credit for his 
efforts. In the pass-fail system he 
would receive no credit. And if this 
student did learn enough to help him 
earn a better standing upon repeating 
the course, he would be recorded only 
as passing, and not as doing good or 
excellent. 

Thus the pass-fail system, however 
good it may seem to the red-eyed col- 
lege student taking final exams, dis- 
criminates against the good as well as 
the pQor student. The best remedy 
for red. road-map eyes is to begin 
studying for final exams a few weeks 
before they begin. I know we all will 
. . . next semester. 

— E. G. W. 



Are Our 'Clear-Cut^ Policies Clear? 



The students of Clarion State have 
shown much concern over the cut sys- 
tem of this institution. But there 
seems to be another matter which has 
now become even more critical — the 
procurement of legal excuses. 

Some students who went to the 
infirmary on Friday, December 20, 
were greeted with a curt "Sorry, we 
aren't excusing anyone today." (This 
was done without referring the stu- 
dent to a doctor.) How could this hap- 
pen? One member of the Health Ser- 
vices staff said this was only in re- 
sponse to a memo from the Office of 
the Dean of Student Affairs. 

This memo was not an order from 
that office for that day only. It was a 
reminder to the staff members of the 
extent of their power — zero. The 
memo also served as an easy "out" for 
doctors and nurses who were swamped 
with so many students, students who 
must have been feigning illness. 

Oh, yes. some of these students 
were sick, but not so sick that they 
couldn't attend classes. Many of them 
did not even have elevated tempera- 
tures, a factor which seems to be the 
sole criterion for judging whether or 
not a student is really ill. (This would 
appear to ignore the fact that it is dur- 
ing this 'not so sick' period that an 
illness is most communicable.) 

This is the reasoning of someone 
whose only concern is to see th^ we 
have the required number of class 
days, regardless of student health. This 
is also the expression of someone who 
has not had the Hong Kong flu. 

Many students, frightened by the 
prospect of no excuse, forced them- 
selves to go to class. Well-meaning 
individuals thus endangered their 
health, as well as the health of the 
students around them. This aLso made 
it possible for many students to carry 
the sickness home with them, spreading 
disease to their family and friends. 

How could a student have legiti- 
mately cut cla.ss that last Friday with- 
out feelinfj thn pangs of guilt one gets 



when cutting a class? The whole sys- 
tem of legal absences is so vague, most 
students were not Sure if they really 
were excused. We will now try to 
clarify the matter. 

First, did you know that neither 
he doctors nor the nurses at the in- 
■irmary have the authority to excuse 
you from classes? (This is assuming 
you are not already bedridden — which 
is an automatic excuse.) Oh, yes, this 
is plainly stated in your student hand- 
book-— on page . . . well, it's in there 
somewhere. 

So now you know. Every time you 
went to that infirmary and the nurse 
took your name . . . you weren't legal- 
ly excused from classes, your name 
was merely added to a list of many 
students who had 'received medical 
attention.' This list, along with vari- 
ous other lists, was then sent to the 
Dean of Academic Affairs, From this 
office is issued a daily list of all stu- 
dents with half-worthwhile excuses. All 
your instructors receive one of these 
lists. Do you .see the trouble you've 
caused? All that bookkeeping because 
of you. a mere student. 

You're legally excused now, right? 
Wrong! 'Vour professor has the right 
either to accept or to reject that ex- 
cuse, and you're definitely responsible 
for the work you missed. Now that is 
ill the handbook. 

So now, pale and drawn from your 
recent illness, you must drag yourself 
to each of your classes and collect 
your assignments, while trying to con- 
vince your professors that you really 
were sick. The responsibility for at- 
tending to your absences has been 
placed where it belongs — on you, the 
student. 

You say you have a professor who 
doesn't read the list of absentees? May 
we refer you to our perfectly clear-cut 
policy . . . 

~B. C. S. 



THE CALL -- Clarion State College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



iap«" 



Prospective Winter Graduates 
And Major Fields Listed 

As the semester draws to a close, most Clarion students are concerned with final 
exams or student teaching as.signments. But there are others who, upon satisfactory 
completion of work in the field in wtiich they lire now enroUed, are anticipating gradu 
ation in January. The pro.spective graduates and their major fields are listed below. 

Those who will receive a Bachelor of Science degree in Secondary Education are: 



I 



Betty Lou Ashcioft 
Dunlel Anthony tiaile.v 
L,\-nn J.imes Barton 
M.'irsh.i El^iine Black 
David George Book 
Diiine Bemlce Boulcien 
M.iry L. Biem 
Snmuel F. Bienlin.in 
Robfit E. Brown 
AniUi Lomine Biuijh 
Paul Wiiyne Citrdoni . 
Jiimes Joseph Clhon .. 
WiUUim l.ee Claik ... 
Marlene Lue Cuprink;) . 
Christine Frank Da vies 
John Domfnick . 
Mary Anne Elders .... 
Phillip Stephen Esno 
Myrllyn Cnrol Kruii2ett<ii 
NichoUis Joseph Gbur 
Richard Wiiyne Oermiin 
Dunlel Giflin 
Fred A. Gilfillan 
Piiscillii Jean Huth^iway 
Sharon G. Hindman 
Daniel George HofTmun 
Jacqueline Cecelia Hot>kins 
Dlnne RuOi Innocent 
G.-ile A. Jew»ll 
Thomas Leo Loitue 

AdeLe Marie Luccl 

HoBallnd Gay M^ider 

Jeanne Elaine Mutlack 

M.Try Rllen Mawhinney 

Patricia Ann McCilncey 

Cynthia Lee McMurdo 

Kaye Ellen Mltrhell . 

Mary Su.<!an Moore 

W..yn^ A. Mori .. 

Charles L. Morreale 

rutrlclii Gro*si Mushrush . . 

Bonlto Loutne Naccaratu 

John D. Nelson 

Harry Anthony Notto 

Margery Ellen OI«on 

Lealie Ann Poltp 

David O. Preston 

Joseph Garry Rtaslncer . . 

Donald Louis }^chn»r 

fliindr.T Ann floh\«no 

Marjorle Anfi flumifek 

Dennis R. Bfncl.ntr 

Roy Lnwton Smoltz, tl 

Sydney S. fit««>e . . 
D.-tvid Alcxahder Sysyn 
Joseplt Ctiurlei 1*110 mas, Jr. 

Mary Lou Tl-lbla . .-. 

Harriet Ann Val^yk^ 

Ahftrdfl L^tfc^a y«tiuun 
Wiitren Gkne ^uiiAc^ 
Linda Kathl««fl ivhtte 
Caroiyri iilii« WhiUng 



... Coniprehfn.sivf EnKlish 

Comprehen.slve Social Studit'."! 

Comprc'hen.six e Social Studies 

Coniprehensi\e EnRlish ii Ris«din« 

Coniprehensive Social Studies 

Spanish 

Con(\preheiisive Enplish it ReadinK 

GeoBraphy 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Geogr.ipl; 

.... Mathematics 

Mathematics 

. . Mathematics 

Sp;ini.sh 

Comprehensive Entcltsh & ReadinB 

Comprehensive EnRlish & Headlne 

Comprehensive English & Readini! 

Comprehensive ElntilLsh & Reading 

Mathematics 

.... Geography 

Biolog-? 

M.Tthcmiittci 

M.ithematics 

Comprehensive English & Re.idixiB 

Comprehensive Science 

Rus.sian 

Comprehensive English & Reading 

Compreheivslve f^ocial Studies 

Comprehensive Social Studies 
French 

, Spanish 

Comprehensive English it Re.idina 

Spanish 

Comprehensive English & Re-idlnj; 

Spanish, History 

. . Comprehen.sivp English 

. Comprehensive Ent;llsh & Rcadiny 

hrench 

Comprehensive Science 

. . Comprehensive English tc Hc.iding 

Comprehensive iiinglish 

Coir.prehensive Enell.«sh St Reading 
Comprehensive Sbcial Studies 

Spanish 

French 

Earth & Space Science 

;,.... Mathematics 

Cortljirehenslve Social Studle.s 

.. Comprehensive English 

.'» Biology 

Comfirehensive Social Studies 

Comprehensive Social Studies 
. Comprehensive English & Reading 

Mathomalirs 

^'. Comprehensive English 

. ConipreH»r»lv« t^ngllsh & Reading 
. ComprMil>nsive Enclish & Reriding 

•.:.., Speech 

-.,;^.. Earth $t Space Science 

.. Speech 

Spanish 



Those students Eligible for a l^aetieior of Science in Elementary Education are: 



Cynda Lou ^iirgeilktoek 
James Allan h4irnA) 
Putsy fellen bHrdtU'v 
Joyce ElUabeth Bri'an 
Cheryl Nadlne Caldwtll 
Doris Mohnkem Cuitittpell 
Ann Louise Cheert 
Bernk-e J.inet CKovdn^c 
Tereia ThomnHon Coiiroy 
Barbara Ann Cov*i 
Carol Ann COX 
Ronnieann Dalrympll? 
Fa ye DavldkAn 
Herman Caesar D*MaO 
Constanc* Nprten t>eMart« 
Joan Victoria purhain 
Ruth Ann Durica 
Terri Ann Dot-St 
Dawn A. Fedtfrka 
Aileen EtUi Flnferhut 
Judith Ann Orali 
Judith Rose He'ld 
Gertrude Mai-y Helntz 
Susan Jane Holmberg 



t^t+> L^* tto6v*r 

ttl«^nM S. ttrMvA 
Kathl«M Attn }(u«he« 
Cutal U. JMtnsoh 
Mi<try tlohD Kam^ert 
Jurt« ^U»»h Klhd^t 
Aorbura L)rn fCtin«er 
Karla Mltfiiin KUrfes* 
dwi-a t. tfcvis 
Mary XAcfc Uttie 
Gu«t Joseph Mederld, Jr. 
ItoWrl tlmottiy Mdfks 
TtMmAfl IttcfiattI Meson 
B(>ti> Am MeMt«r 
t>a9i«^ Kanc«a, McLatn 
llutti CharUn* McMurtly 
Hartota Oavitl Mecklenbure 

WiUlarn R. MllUr 
Linda Ca,rol Morrone 
ttichttrd ivlMt Orr 
i^nricia ^xton t>le<repola 
PatHcta Ann« t^oaiivczak 



Candidates for a Bachelor of Science in the field of I. 



Beniice J.tnfet Chovanvc 

Faye Davidfon 

Constrirjce Noreen bevM.ilrte 

Terri Ann Durat 

Slilxley Elaine Dutko .' 

Biirburu LoUla» fimmer 
Valerie Jean Frederick'. 

Christie Eileen G»sler 

Sherrill A. Koienski 

K.iy Cobler Krlebei 

Don Marlon Paradise 

Donna Irene Paul 

Ruth Ann Pushkar 

Lynn Arnold Rhoads 

Edward Tesla 

Pauline iean Ztiza 



Sahdra Le« Pollock 
Otilrld Crosby Rose 
Ntttiey E. Sarver 
Bdnlta Marie Scalzott 
Mlehalene Sewchok 
Dolores Per6ck Shlska 
SiMan Vel-ohlca iShotts 
ft^verly Doyle Shropshire 
Marjorle Plyler Shumaker 
Adii Lou .Sllverbtrg 
Shllrley Wiant Smathers 
Jildtth Paulette Sobey 
Atalin Dlanne Stuart 
Suznmie Sell Tatrai 
Joan Eileen Thomson « 
Gary Le« Verelll 
Judith Polosky Vincent 
Judith Lee Walcott 
Cyrlila Margail Walther 
Freda Eillen Whi^eler 
Joah Marie Wisniewski 
Donna Gay Wynkoop 
Karen Lee Yuksic 



Librari.in 
I.ibrari.in 
Librarian 
Librarian 
Librarian 
Librarian 
Librarian 
Librarian 
Librarian 
Librarian 
Lihr.iri:in 
Librari m 
LibrarlMi 
Libra ri.;;! 
Libr.irian 
Librarian 



ibrary Science 


are: 


Comprehensive 


School 


Com|>rehensive 


School 


Comprehensive 


School 


Comprehensive 


School 


Comprehensive 


School 


Comprehensive 


School 


Comprehensive 


School 


Comprehensive 


School 


Comprehensive 


School 


Comprehensive 


School 


Comprehensive 


School 


Comprehensive 


School 


Comprehensive 


School 


Comprehensive 


School 


Comprehensive 


School 


Comprehensive 


School 



The following students will receive a Bachelor of Science in Speech Pafhology 
and Audiology: 



Mary Jonnnn K^zusky Solomon 
Stephanie Concettina 
Marsha L.vnn Za^orac 



Speech Correction 
Speech Correction 
Siteech Correction 



Bachelor of Science Degrees in Mental Retardation will be awarded to: 

BonltH Suzanne Woolbaugh 



M«ry Lynn Becker 
Kathleen M Gehrig 
Douglas Michael Hamrock 



Mary M^rguret Kinney 
Carla Jean Naylor Namie 
R. Eltfine Smelu 



Students to graduate under the Liberal Arts curriculum include: 



Nancy Ann Bulger 

David Lee Bunnell 

Janice Marilyn Day 

Joi-n Lee Doutdass 

Janet Mary Ohter 

Chwrles Joseph Paine .. 
Terence Michael Tofcar 



Spanish 

Natural S.^tences 
Social StiKJic. 



Humanities 

Mathematics 
Soci.Tl Sciences 



James Waller Morten, Jr., w»U ree^ve A degree in Business Administr.itinn. 
Joan K. MatBon will be awarded a degrc* in Public School Nursing. 

Two womw have satisfactorily completed their Master of Education requirements; 

Clulre Elizabeth Bowley and Nancy Jean Smith. 



Friday, January 10, 19tt9 



Letters to The Editor 



The 'Old School' 

Editor, The Call: 

It seems that every group pos.sessing a 

cau-se" has recently emerged to extract 
some form of .support from the success of 
the .spectacular Apollo 8 Hight. The unbtv 
lieving scientists stated that the results mnly 
confirmed the fact that twlief in a divine 
power is now outdated, the minister claimed 
that the events have proved that man is 
constantly humbled when he ventures into 
tlie vast universe created by God. Even the 
economists took the view that the success 
of the flight proved the vast superiority of 
tile American economic system. But as an 
Individual now involved in that process of 
learning to teach and convey ideas to the 
children of the future, I viewed the Apollo 
space flight with a different interest. 

Those three brave and highly intelligent 
men who flawlessly guided the orbiting cap- 
sule were a product of what is called the 
"old school" of educaticn. They were educa- 
ted in an age when the memorization of 
the arithmetic tables was a must, when spell- 
ing and penmanship were constantly drilled 
and the state capitols were recited in class, 
when respect for elders and classroom eti- 
quette were unquestionable, when the Lords 
Prayer began each day and the love of their 
country and its history grew with each pro- 
gressive grade. 

To see the change in the educational pro- 
cess since those days, one only has to pay 
a visit to a neighborhood school Order is 
a joke, resjiect tor the teacher and other 
adults non-existent. Furniture is destroyed, 
books and materials destroyed and the charac- 



teristics of the old school ' are all but for- 
gotten. 

It is said that the object of education is 
to teach students to "think" and that the 
new educational processes do ju,st tliat. 
Teachers learn to treat the students with 
psychology instead of a boot in the pants. 
Textbooks must be full of colorful illustrations 
the child may relate to his environment. 
Sets and elements now make the memori- 
zation of arithmetic tables obsolete. Class- 
room furniture must be contoured and color 
coordinated. Such is the "new school" of 
education. 

I don't know if the astronauts educated un- 
der the "old school" ever learned how to 
"think." You be the judge— but I have a 
funny feeling they didn't make the trip by 
magic. 

STEVE BREZZO 

Tapes Wasted 

Editor, The Call: 

It is my understanding that the Clarion 
Library has a collection of close to 600 re- 
cordings. As students, we are not allowed 
access to these records, but most of them 
have been recorded on tapes for student use. 
I am also under the impression that there 
are 20 tape decks in tlie basement of Old 
Science that are for student use. These tape 
decks have been in storage for two years. 
Although many of our instnictors have re- 
quested the installation of these machines, 
nothing has been done to fulfill their requests. 
What must we do to obtain the use of these 
tapes and tape decks? 

ROBERT E WEISS 

Music Major 



'D.C.-M.' Returns 
To Grace a Page 
Of Clarion Call 

In the 1967-1968 school year the 
Call was fortunate in being able to 
print in its columns several short poems 
by David Christie-Murray, a visiting 
associate professor of English. Al- 
though Professor Christie-Murray has 
returned to England, he composed an- 
other bit of light verse during a short 
visit to the United States in December, 
and the editors of the Call are delight- 
ed to be able to print another "D. C- 
M." 

WORSE AND HEARSE 

(A Doctors' House in Clarion has re- 
cently become a funeral home.) 
Patients do die, in spite of doctors' 
skill, 

And doctors move elsewhere to cure 
or kill, 

But should one substitute for the 
physician 

— As if he were an ally — the morti- 
cian? 

And should rouged, healthy corpses 
lie in state 

Where once poor pallid corpses used 
to wait? 

Men die, in spite of medico and nurse, 
But should the house take a turn for 
the hearse? 

— D. C.-M. (post mortem!) 

New Flag Is Designed 

.John Hankey, a junior at Clarion State 
College, was the designer of the new flag 
that appears at the top of the front page 
of this issue of the Call. 



Personal Facts 
Are Revealed 



By M.4GG!E BEIERLE 

The resiUts of a recent, considerably exten- 
.sivc canvassing of CSC campus concerning 
the intimate personal facts about the occupa- 
tion, recreation and miscellaneous activities 
of both the male and female species of stu- 
dents during their recent leave of absence 
from the stimulating intellectual atmosphere 
provided by this educational institution unfbr- 
tunately cannot be revealed due to the legal 
suits which would i>e immediately following. 
However, the benevolent editt)rs have con- 
sented to F)rint a brief statistical analysis 
compiled for your reading enjoyment. 
Statistics 

Planned to do extensive .studying, 94%; took 
books home (for parents' benefit), 87.3%; ac- 
tually OF)ened the books, 12.7%; actually stud- 
ied, .63% ; made New Year's rasolutions, 75%,; 
those who have, to date, kept them, 29.35%o 
(this figure is accounted for by the large 
number of resolutions concerning the con- 
sumi>tion of alcohol next December 31); tho.se 
who were mugged at Times Square on New 
Year's Eve, .04%; those who were disillusion- 
ed about Santa Claus this year, M%. 
Unusual Individual Endeavors 

Several of the faculty members spent their 
vacations in interesting ways: 

Mr. Lillstrom explored the bottom of the 
Atlantic. 

Mr. Grejda checked Tahiti for authenticity 
of Melville's writings. 

Mr. Redfern explored retirement possibili- 
ties in Florida. 

Mr. GraybiU spent his entire vacation grad- 
ing term papers. 

Coach Jacks spent his time drilling his 
three-year-old son on lateral passes. 

Several .students did almost as well: 

Raine Martin sat through 27 con.secutive 
performances of "Funny Girl," making this 
a "jrand total of 184 times she has seen the 
film. 

Sa'Iy Ann Snyder sold coloring books door 
to door. 

Bob Heimann traveled to New York City to 
see "Hair" (it is allowed there). 

Willie Saimders and John Dorish established 
a Jitney service in the Hill district. 

One student, who asked us to withhold his 
name, sabotaged the electrical system at CSC, 
in hopes of having final week cancelled. 



The Clarion Call 



CALL Office, Room 7, Harvey Hall 
Clarion State College, Clarion, Penna. 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Carolyn Welesko 

BUSINESS MANAGER Tom Smith 

NEWS EDITOR Sandy Diesel 

FEATURE EDITOR Sue Fair 

COPY EDITOR Rosemary Slebodnik 

EXCHANGE EDITOR Peg Foley 

CO-SPORTS EDITORS Denpifl* Morrow, Gary Andres 

CIRCULATION MANAGER Pam Rider 

STAFF MEMBERS Elizabeth Curley, Margaret Beierle, 

Ann Rohrbaugh, Ed Wozniak, Gary Daurora, Larry Carter, 
Georgana Winters, Linda Sonnenfeld, Owen Winters, Diatuia 
Cherry, Larilyn Andre, Dick Mears, Bob Toth, Jerry Zary, 
Nancy Sarginger, Judy Summy, Linda Pifer, Kathy Jones 
ADVISOR Richard K. Redfern 



(PNPAI 



PNtSTlfAIU 

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4 



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^iiliiiliiiiiiiii 



MiiliiiiMilii 



Friday, January 10, 1WJ9 



THE CALL — elation Stale College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



Page 3 



A PEEK AT GREEKS 



n« Lfr « •<■ 



DELTA LAMBDA TAU 

This Saturday is the drive for cerebral 
palsy in the Clarion area. The sisters are 
worldng with the high school students in the 
drive. The drive will end with a dance for 
the high school students chaperoned by the 
Sisters and the leaders. Anyone wishing to 
make a donation can bring their donation 
to the Ross Memorial Library on Saturday 
afternoon. 

We are now selling address label stickers. 
The cost is 500 for $1. If anyone wishes 
to purchase the .stickers, they can contact 
Janie Hall or Marcia Evanko. 

As the semester draws to a close we wi.sh 
everyone good luck on their finals and hope 
to see .vou next semester. 

ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA 

The sisters of Alpha Sigma Alpha would 
like to offer their sympathy to the Sisters 
of Zeta Tau Alpha on the loss of their sis- 
ter, Judy Miller. 

The best of luck goes to sisters Pat Olean, 
Iu)ui.se Kish, Betsy Feldman, Wendy Chris- 
toff, Linda Curran and Laurel King on their 
student teaching assignments. 

SIGMA TAU GAMMA 

The brothers of Sigma Tau Gamma wish 
to congratulate the newly-elected officers: 
president, Larry Morris; vice president, Ja- 
mes Ryland; secretary, Mictiael McCormick; 
and treasurer, Thomas Fleig. 

Congratulations and best wislics to Bo Ross 
and Cheryl Bowser who were married over 
Christmas recess. 

Time is near for the annual game of the 
year between A team and B team. A team 
is tMKJsting 13 returning lettermen this sea- 
.son. The A team's roster is as follows: 
Bo Ross, Mike Doniinick, Fran Sirianni, Ron 
Corcetti, Jay Spang, Regis Naggy, Mike Mc- 
Cormick, Chip Leslie, Joe Filipowski, Rich 
Martin, Bill Laughlin, and Boh Lang. 

Great sorrow is expressed to the three 
men who were injured on B team while run- 
ning sprints. 

ZETA TAU ALPHA 

Holiday activities were plentiful for the 
Zetas. It l)egan with "Buddy Week." Buddies 
were revealed at the Christmas party held 
at Mrs. Shusherebas, one of our advisor's 
home. That day the Zetas also attended 
church in a group. Aiiother good time was 
the big-sis Little-sis party held at Kerry Mc- 
Call's cabin. 

Initiation was held on December 18 and 
the Zetas welcome and congratulate 16 new 
sisterF. 

Some of the .sisters were timers for the 

recently held swim meet. 

■ White violets and Zeta love are extended 

to Sara Cox and Debbie Burghardt on their 

pinnings, Judy Drab and Linda Ferris on 



their engagements and Beverly Lechner on 
her marriage. 

Good luck to the following sisters who will 
be student teaching next semester: Carole 
Reis, Gerry Grozzi, Linda Dezenrick, Debbie 
Moore, Ruth .Anne Swartzwelder, Barb Dim 
meriing, Kathy Curry, Rose Ingram, Carol 
Dietz, Jan Hoffman, and Hope Henry. 

Black ribl)ons worn by the sisters this week 
represented the deep sense of loss due to 
the death of our beloved sister, Judy Miller. 
We would like to thank all those who have 
expressed their sympathy. 

ALPHA SIGMA TAU 

The .sisters of Alpha Sigma Tau express 
their deepest sympathies to the sisters of 
teta Tau Alpha on the loss of their sister, 
Judy Miller. 

On Monday, Jan. 6, formal initiation was 
held for our seven pledges. We congratulate 
these new sisters for finally m?.idng it after 
eight long weeks of pledging. After initiation, 
Neiie Morella was given the "Top Pledge " 
award. After welcoming seven new sisters 
into AST, we presented yellow roses to those 
senior sisters who will be going student teach- 
ing next .semester. We will all miss Julie 
Campbell, Chris Carlson, Cliris Maletic, Anna 
Mae Deemer, Tana Fairfax, Pat Joseph, Ca- 
rol Peters, Laura Williams, Kathy Darak, 
Na'icy Boden, and Thekia Fall. 

Yellow roses go out to Sue Graham on 
her pinning to John "Blue" Schellenberger, 
TKE; Tana Fairfax on her pinning to Tom 
Wilkinson, Phi Sigma Kappa: Marietta Hill 
on her marriage to John Klingler, Theta Chi; 
and Jill Thorwart on her marriage to Terry 
Steis. 

SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA 

The Tri Sigmas are all glad to get back 
to school and we would like to congratulate 
our new sisters on their initiation. They are 
as follows: Kathy Head, Sue Pelino, Elaine 
Debiak, Peggy Ward, Jan Gorensik, Rita Ro- 
per, Carol Shugarts, Pam Tylwalk and Kathy 
Burgeson. 

Purple violets to Cheryl Bowser and "Bo" 
Ross on their marriage on January 4, Marcie 
Hunnell on her engagement to Mike Brono- 
v/itz, Alpha Gamma Phi, and to Gail Relick 
on her pinning to Bob Cunningham, Sigma 
Tau Gamma. 

DELTA ZETA 

Pink ro.ses and much happiness to our sis- 
ter, Merriarme Giflin, who recently became 
the bride of Jim Massen. 

Our 17 pledges displayed lots of courage 
and stamina during Hell Night held on Jan. 
6. The worst is now over. Initiation will take 
place in the near future. 

The sisters would like to thank the pledges 
and commend them on their wonderful pledge 
party, which was held right before vacation. 
The girls presented a series of fairy tale skits, 



Pins, Rings & Bells 



PINS 



Ray Len2i, Theta Xi, to Dee Menozzi, 
Alpha Sigma Alpha. 

Gregg Schlieper, Tau Kappa Epsilon, to 
Vicki Hardway. Alpha Sigma Alpha. 

Petty Corbett to Jim Yearger, Mansfield 
Stntc College. 

Tony Donghia, Phi Sigma Epsilon, to Sara 
Cox. Zeta Tau Alpha. 

Tom Wilkinson, »*hi Sigma Kappa, to Tana 
Fairfax, Alpha Sigma Tau. 

John 'Blue " Schellenberger, Tau Kappa 
Epsilon, to Sue Graham, Alpha Sigma Tau. 

Steve PoUit, Tau Kappa Epsilon, to Nancy 
Woleott, CSC. 

RINGS — 

Dick Shane, Tarentum, Pa., to Lynda Os- 
kin, CSC. 

Biennis Emanuel, Phi Sigma Epsilon, to 
Linda DeMaeo. 



Carta Hartz, CSC, to Ralph Beck, Butler, 
Pa, 

David Wilkerson, Greensburg, Pa., to April 
Groof, CSC. 

Mike Bronivdcz, Alpha Gamma Phi, to Mar- 
cie Hunnel, Tri Sigma. 

Sandra Strattan, CSC, to Gene Spangler. 

George McGarry, Alpha Gamma Phi, to 
Judy Drab, Zeta Tau Alpha. 

Joe Urban to Linda Ferris, Zeta Tau Alpha. 

BELLS — / 

John Klingler, Theta Chi, to Marietta Hill, 
Alpha Sigma Tau. 

Terry Steis, U.S. Army, to Jill Thorwart, 
Alpha Sigma Tau. 

James Morgan to Judith Johnston, CSC. 

Cheryl Bowser, lYi Sigma, to Robert 'Bo " 
Ross, Sigma Tau Gamma. 

Demis Stuart, CSC, to William Kehew, 
CSC. 



flH 



MODERN DINER 

Where Friends Meet to Eat 

Enjoy Life . . . Eat Out Here Often 
We Are Always Open 

t We Cater to the Family Children Are Always Welcome 



■cs 



assa 



If 



r-Tr t' i 



CLARION 
DRY CLEANING CO; 

OFFERS YOU: 

• 1 Hour Dry Cleaning 

• Shirt Laundry • Tailoring 

• Formal Wear Rentals 

541 LIBERTY STREET CLARION 

PHONE 228-6121 

OPEN MON. . FRI. 'TIL 9 P.M. 

CLOSE SAT. AT 6 P.M. 



tlieir pledge song, and poems and gifts for 
the big si.sters. Everyone had a great time 
and each and every pledge is to be con-" 
gratulated. Special pink roses go to Donna 
Sacco, voted Best Pledge; Sara Waugh for 
havijig the best box; Sanch Hunt for having 
the best garter; and Sharon Campbell for 
having the best pledge book. 

Delta Zetas extend their sympathy to the 
Zeta Tau Alpha .sorority on the loss of their 
sister, Judy Miller. 

PHI SIGMA EPSILON 

Phi Sigma Epsilon salutes its outgoing of- 
ficers this semester, and thank them for their 
fine services to the Iraternity. They are: 
Charles I ayne, president; Craig McClure, 
vice president; Dave Day, treasurer; Gene 
Herritt, corresponding secretary; Chad Han- 
na, recording secretary; and Tom Swartz, 
social chairman. Congratulations to the new- 
ly installed officers, who are: Chuck "Tree" 
Sipe, president; Art Triveri, vice president; 
Tony Donghi, treasurer; Phil Payne, corres- 
ponding secretary; Bob "Obie " Oberdorf, re- 
cording secretary; and "Little Joe " Robosky, 
social chairman. 

Brotlier Chuck Payne will be lost to the 
brotherhood due to graduation. Chuck will 
be remembered as one of Phi Sigma Ep- 
silon's finest presidents. Brother Robbie Ro- 
binson will be transferring to Millersville 
State College. Sorry to see you leave Rob! 
Best of luck to brothers Dave Day, Chad 
Hanna, Gene Herritt, Don Kress, and Tom 
Swartz who will be student teaching next 
semester. 

The appointment of pledgemaster for the 
second semester was made to Denny Em- 
anuel, and his assistant will be brother John 
Schmader. 




Should old oinaam'tance^ he -Forgot .^ 
and ne^er hroaa^nZ "to mind 



o 00 



Dr. Hardwick is Largely Responsible for Work Clarion Hosts 
Of College Readers; Readers Aim to Recreate ^ 



*Ideas, Emotions, and Experiences of an Author' 



By JERRILYN JONES 

"Got a mind? Want it blown (or at least 
shaken a little)? Then the College Readers 
have something for you!" 

So l)egau a rtory in the October 18th issue 
of the Clarion Call. The story announced 
a production (Mac Leish's J.B.) by the Col- 
lege Readers, an on-campus drama group. 
Advised by Dr. Mary Hardwick, associate 
professor of speech, the Readers e^stitute 
an interesting and informative extracurricu- 
lar activity. 

What the College Readers have to offer 
the students of Clarion State College is par- 
tially the result of the work of their sponsor. 
Dr. Hardwick. "The t)est way to describe 
me would be to say that I am theater-or- 
iented. I have rummaged from oae job to 
another to be near, in, around the theater." 
Dr. Hardwick's enthusiasm and energy play 
an important part in the organization of the 
Readers. Her experience in the world of the 
theater is a valuable asset to the Readers. 
Dr. Hardwick earned her living as an actress 
at the Pittsburgh Playhouse. She has worked 
as a drama consultant at the First Presby- 
terian Church of Stamford, Conn., in its 
ministry of drama. "While I worked there 
I asked myself: What can a play teach -us 
as human beings? Can it teach us how to 
live?" 

diurch Work Confining 

Dr. Hardwick found church work too con- 
fining, too rule-and-regulation ridden. "That 
was when 1 decided to become an educator." 
She left religious drama in 1964 and went 
to work on her Ph.D. at Michigan State. For 
the three years she spent in residence at 
the university, she supported herself by work- 
ing as an actress. Dr. Hardwick stated her 
goal as a teacher and adviser: "You could 
say that I am motivated by the desire to 
find a way and means to achieve a fuller 
and richer life for the individuals with which 
I come in contact." The Readers are indeed 
lucky to have such an able adviser. 

The aims of the Readers are many. The 
primary concern is recreating for an audi- 
ence the ideas, emotions, and experiences 
set down by an author. This recreation of 
experiences is artistic and dramatic in nature. 
The selection and analysis of literature plays 
an important part in the aims of the Rea(fers. 
Experiences found by the Read^-s in chosen 
material are assimilated and then projected 
to an audience by means of physical and 
vocal techniques. According to Dr. Hardwick, 
this oral interpretation of literature is m<wre 
difficult than acting; the techniques of oral 
inteipretation involve physical restraint. The 
reader must project to an audience with his 
voice and facial expressions what an actor 
projects with his whole body. The chief goal 
of the Readers is audience understanding 
and enjoyment. 

Physical Restraint Necessary 

The literature used by the College Readers 
must be that which lends itself well to being 
read aloud. Dramatic material which is pri- 
marily dependent on action for impact iffli't 
suitable because of the physical restraint tltat 
must be exercised in oral interpretation. The 
material must be audial; the audi^ice must 
be able to visualize characters, setting, and 
action without actually seeing them. 

Hie kind of person that would most enjoy 



participating in the Readers' activities would 
be a person who has performance interest; 
he would have to be willing to go before 
an audience to instruct or to entertain. Ac- 
cording to Dr. Hardwick, memt>ership in the 
Reaaers would be the perfect experience for 
the person who desires a recreational and 
creative outlet for his feelings and ideas as 
well as an outlet for free expression. 

The Readers engage in two tyi>es of annual 
activities. The first kind consists of major 
performances such as "In White America" 
which was put on last spring. The second 
kind of activity is travel. The Readers attend 
oral interpretation festivals and workshops, 
and contests. These activities present an op- 
portunity for constructive, informative group 
or professional evaluations of readings, as 
well as an opportunity to meet new people 
and acquire new ideas. 

Material To Be Screened 

The Readers are now working on the for- 
mation of a show-case committee for the 
screening of the original material l)eing sub- 
mitted to them for possible use. Plans for 
the future include an attempt to gain official 
clearance for the use of space in Davis Hall 
for a weekly reading hour. Also, the Readers 
are engaged in raising funds to send to Eng- 
land the six readers and guitarist who per- 
formed "In White America." In England, 
the Readers would tour churches and schools, 
giving performances. This trip is slated for 
May and June of 1969, if the Readers are 
successful in raising the necessary money. 

Members of the College Readers are very 
enthusiastic about the organization, its goals, 
and its activities. In interviews with several 
members, two qqestions were asked: "Why 
did you join the Readers? " and "What do 
you feel you're getting out of your member- 
ship? " 

George Hall, acting president of the Read- 
ers, answered the first question this way: 
"My Interest in the Readers' Theater began 
in iiigh school. I attended Central Dauphin 
in East Harrisburg, and my school took sev- 
eral championships in speech and oral inter- 
interpretation." To the second question, 
George replied: "I feel I'm gaining insight 
into literary works. I get a personal satis- 
faction out of expressing myself, out of doing 
something. The art of expression is a big 
part of people's lives. I feel the satisfaction 
of accomplishing something and of reaching 
an audience so they can share my exper- 
iences." 

Cites Enjoyment, Satisfaction 

Cece Carter, acting secretary of the College 
Readers, when asked why she joined, replied. 
"Out of respect for Dr. Hardwick and out 
of the enjoyment I get out of oral interpre- 
tation. I want to help promote activities for 
Clarion students, activities that will help 
bring out unrealized potential." To the second 
question, Cece replied, "I am able to express 
myself more fully. I get a satisfaction, a 
sense of accomplisliment from oral interpre- 
tation. I am getting to understand other peo- 
ple better, and I really enjoy it. Besides, 
being a Reader is fun. And I'm learning 
oral interpretive techniques while I'm having 
fun." 

Cwinie Carter, a memtier of bc^ the Col- 
lege Readers and the College Players, re- 
sjgoaded t his way to the first questioa; "The 



Readers give me an opportunity to explore 
a new and challenging method of verbal com- 
munication.' 

To the second question, sne replied: "1 
feel I have learned more effective expres- 
sion of my own thoughts and feelings through 
learning to clearly and accurately express the 
views of different authors. 1 have gained 
a valuable skill for both in and out of the 
classroom. I have gained experience. There 
has been an expansion of my mind and per- 
sonality because of the different roles I have 
read. I have gained a better understanding 
of people through readings, travel exper- 
iences, and meeting new people. I have 
learned vocal control and improved my speak- 
ing and understanding of human nature." 

The College Readers have much to offer 
to a Clarion student: instruction in oral inter- 
pretive techniques, vocal and literary exper- 
iences, travel, the chance to meet people 
and exchange ideas. The Oct. 18 story seems 
to sum up the Readers and tJie opportunities 
they offer students: "Got a mind? Want it 
blown (or at least shaken a little)? Then 
the College Readers have something for 
you!" 



Seneca Valley High School, ZeLienople, cop- 
, ped first-place trophy in an open invitational 
swimming meet Saturday at which Clarion 
hosted ten Western Pennsylvania high school 
swimming teams in their new Waldo S. Tip- 
pin Natatorium. 

Approximately 200 swimmers and divers 
pailicipated in the meet which is to Ijecome 
an annual event for l^gh school swimmers 
in the Western Pennsylvania area. 
, Trophies were awarded to the first six 
places in the event. Results in total points 
awarded in swimming and diving are: 

First, Seneca Valle.v\ 265; second, Gate- 
way. 262 and one-half; 'third, Penn Hills, 229 
and one-half; fourth, Baldwin, 216; fifth, Mc 
Keesport, 204 and one-half; sixth, Burrell, 
125; seventh. Norwin, 94 and one-half; tied 
for eighth, Charleroi and Riverside, 24 each; 
ninth, Kiski Area, 14. 

Attention Students: 

The next issue of the Clarion Call will 
be on Friday, Feb. 7, the first full week 
of the second semester. Because finals begin 
on Monday and because students will be away 
over semester break, the Call will not be 
published for the next three weeks. 



Where were you when the lights went out 
. . again? 




Make a Career Out of Living 
"in Pennsylvania 



Pennsylvania is a vital, exciting state 
with enough challenging jobs, interesting 
people and fascinating places to make just 
living a full-time career. 

There are opportunities everywhere in 
the Keystone State . . , opportunities for 
satisfying work in every area of our 
expanding business world . . . opportunities 
for relaxing fun in our many summer and 
-winter resorts and recreation areas . . . 
opportunities for learning in our historic 
cities and modern universities. 

Pennsylvania-style living means 
excitementi 



'100,000 PENNSYLVANIANS' 

P.O. Box 3365, 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17101 



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RAYMOND P. SHAFER, Governor 



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Page 4 



THE CALL 



Clarion State College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



Friday, January 10, 1969 



Scots Scalp 
Eagles 71-69 
In 7 Seconds 

On December 13, Coach John Joy's men 
lost to the Fighting Scots of Edinboro in a 
Western Conlerencc hcartbreaker when Ed- 
inboro's Frank Smith broke a 69 (>9 tie by 
swishing the net with seven seconds left. 

Clarion had held a substantial lead over 
the Scots at several points in the first half 
and showed a 3(5 32 halftime edge, but they 
faltered in the final 20 minutes of play. High 
scorer for the game was Frank Smith ol 
Edinboro with 20, while Larry Kubovchick 
and Joe Chalmers had 18 and 17 points for 
the Eagles. 

The preliminary also provided some thrills, 
with the Edinboro frosh defeating the Eagle 
team. 93-92. 

CLARION FG FP TP 

Chalmers 4 9 17 

Kubovchick 5 8 18 

Mdrtin 4 4 12 

Lawry 3 17 

Parks ' 2 4 

Fusco 113 

Luce 4 8 

Totals '. 23 23 69 

EDINBORO FG FP TP 

Weaver Oil 

Ziner 2 4 

Knowlton 3 1. 7 

F. Smith ; 9 2 20 

Senkins , 2 4 

Gettyes 6 1 • 13 

Robinson _ 3 4, 10 

Dickinson : .'. 2 2 6 

L. Smith : 3 6 

Totals 30 11 71 




REGIS RUANE (24) goes up for a lay- 
up and scores two for CSC against 
Point Park. 



Future Flicks 



Continuing at the Garby until Tuesday is 
the all time classic 'Gone with the Wind." 
Beginning Wednesday is Stanley Kubrick's 
fantastic "2001; A Space Odyssey" which is 
more than a movie, it's 2 visual experience, 
a prophetic tale about the day after tomor- 
row. 

Shirley MacClanc's 'The Bliss of Mrs. Blos- 
som" follows Peter Sellers' "I Love You, 
Alice B. Toklas " Sunday at the Orpheum. 
It is followed on Wednesday by Frank Sina- 
tra and Rachel Welch in "Lady m Cement." 



Support 
Your 

College 
Activities 




LARRY KUBOVCHICK (32) tries for 
tiie rebound in tiie midst of adversar- 
ies. 

Point Park 
Hands CSC 
71-56 Loss 



The Golden Eagles took a 71-56 drubbing 
at the hands of the Point Park Pioneers 
last Monday night in Tippin Gym. 

Clarion's team, with sloppy passing and 
failure to get the rebounds, were definitely 
off-form and blew a shakily attained 33-26 
halftime lead to let the Pioneers of Pittsburgh 
steadily widen the gap in the second half. 

Point Park's Bill Long was the big gun 
in blasting the Eagles with 27 points, nine 
of them made at the foul line; Ed Ritchie 
also found the target with 14. 

Buddy Martin, a fairly strong player, paced 
the Eagles with 16 points. George Lawry, 
who will be out of action for a few games 
with a sprained ankle, dumped in 13. Larry 
Kubovchick. reinjuring his ankle, also missed 
the CaUfornia game Wednesday. 

CLARION FG FP TP 

Kubovchick 4 8 

Lawry 5 3 13 

Park ..' 

Martin 6 4 16 

Podolak 

Luce . .: 10 2 

Chalmers 3 17 

Ruane . ; 3 3 9 

Westerman Oil 

Totals 22 12 56 

POINT PARK FG FP TP 

Metz 5 10 

Long 9 9 27 

Josefoski :.. 3 17 

Ritchie 7 14 

Wykoff 113 

Donovan 113 

Dudley 3 17 

Totals ■ 29 13 71 




HIGH SCORER in the Point Parle con- 
test. Buddy Martin (12) pits his 
strength against Dudley (33). 

'B' Wrestlers Score Win 

Coach Bob Bubbs Clarion "B" wrestling 
team shut out the newly-formed Gannon Col- 
lege grappling .squad, 37 0. Wednesday night 
at F>ic. 

Two first period and one second period 
pins were scored by the Clarion State mat- 
men. The Erie lads lost two matches on for- 
feits. 



Cagers Place 2nd, 3rd 
In Holiday Tourneys 



The Golden Eagle cagers returned from 
the Troy, Alabama, tournament with a se- 
cond-place trophy and two All-Star individual 
awards. 

In the opening round Dec. 16, Clarion de- 
feated its host team, Troy State, 74-69. Bud- 
dy Martin was high scorer with 25 points, 
Dennis Luce was second with 21. 

CLARION FG FP TP 

Martin 10 5 25 

Luce , 9 3 21 

Park 6 3 15 

Kubovchick i 3 17 

Chalmers 10 2 

Fusco Oil 

Ruane 10 2 

Podolak Oil 

Totals I. 30 14 74 

TROY FG FP TP 

Cannon 2 4 8 

Hawkins - ...10 7 27 

Billik ,.... 2 3 7 

Imbiacco .'. 12 24 

Cauldwell 113 

Totals 27 15 69 

Ohio Northern University defeated Bethel 
College of Tennessee in the -second game, 
giving the Ohio team a chance to face Clarion 
in the final game. Althougti the game was 
close a large part of the lime, the Eagles 
ran into foul trouble. The Ohio team out- 
scored Clarion, 91-75, although Bob Fusco 
had 20 points and Buddy Martin 17 in the 
losing battle. 

All-Star plaques for outstanding performan- 
ces in the tournament went to Buddy Martin 
and Dennis Luce. 

CLARION FG FP TP 

Chalmers - 3 6 

Martin 6 5 17 

Kubovchick 10 2 

Luce 3 3 9 

Park 2 4 

Fusco 9 2 20 

Westerman 3 6 

Ruane 5 1 11 

Totals 32 11 75 

OHIO NORTHERN FG FP TP 

Foster 7 9 23 

Young 9 7 25 

Ross 4 4 12 

Quayle 2 4 

Minix 3 4 10 

Keams 10 2 

Richert 5 3 13 

Fortner 10 2 

Totals 32 27 91 

Individual participation trophies went to 
an players in the annual affair jointly spon- 
sored by Troy State College and the Troy 
Chamber of Commerce. The cagers, upon 
return, reported Southern hospitality to be 
excellent, with fine lodging, complete trans- 
portation, and four meals during each of 
the four days' visit. 

During the Christmas recess, the Eagles 
traveled to Indiana of Pennsylvania for tlie 
annual Christmas Tree Tournament on Dec. 
26-27. Point Park College in Pittsburgh and 
John F. Kennedy College, Wahoo, Nebraska, 
also participated. 

In the first round. Clarion lost to Indiana, 



Frosh Cage Team A 
Outshoots Foes 



Maintaining a wide lead the entire distance, 
the Clarion State College freshman cagers 
went on a scoring spree 'December 19, to 
swamp the Community College of Beavet 
County, 121-79. 

Coach Stan Mailman's chargers put up an 
aggressive shooting and passing attack 
against the two-year college team from the 
Beaver Valley, dumping in nearly twice as 
many field goals as the foes, although the 
visitors outdid them at the foul line, 25-23. 
The Eagle frosh converted 60 percent of their 
scoring tries to 32 percent for the Beaverites. 

Continuing strong bids to nail down varsity 
slots next year for the Golden Eagles were 
Tom Murtaugh, with top score of 25; Mike 
Rastatter, a consistently fine shooter who net- 
ted 23; Greg Thompson, strongman with 16, 
and Al Ritchie, with 22. 

CLARION 

Thompson 

Jeffersi 

Haas 

Rastatter 

Frye 

Ritchie 

Murtaugh 

Mudger 

Vitcain 

Niver 



112-62, with the Eagle scoring spread through- 
out the team: Larry Kubovchick led the team 
scoring with 13 points. 

CLARION FG FP TP 

Kubovchick 3 7 13 

Ruane 3 2 8 

Luce 2 3 7 

Lawry 2 3 7 

Martin 2 15 

Chalmers 2 4 

Fusco 2 4 

Park 4 2 10 

Podolak 12 4 

Totals 21 20 62 

INDIANA FG FP TP 

Mattocks 9 2 20 

Shoop : 6 12 

Lupek 6 12 

DeMark 3 6 

Smith 6 1 13 

Donnelly 2 2 6 

McCullough 7 3 17 

Erney r* 5 10 

Walencwz 2 2 

Rusinca 2 2 

Gruseck 5 2 12 

Totals 49 14 112 

In the consolation game the following night. 
Regis Ruane's 21 points paced Clarion to 
an 87-73 victory over John F. Kennedy Col- 
lege. George Lawry and Dennis Luce each 
tallied 17 points in a win which captured 
third place in the tournament for the Eagles. 

CLARION FG FP TP 

Ruane 7 7 21 

Lawry 8 1 17 

Luce 8 1 17 

Martin 4 6 14 

Kubovchick 4 2 10 

Podolak 2 4 

Westerman . 2 4 



Totals 



.35 17 87 



JFK ,^ , FG FP TP 

Rasmussen ^.....:.*..*. ;. 6 4 16 

Dankidge 7 6 20 

Toomer 4 4 12 

Spellman '. '. 5 2 12 

Sandquist 1 2 

Isaacson 1 2 

Stendun !..:..' :.. 4 19 

Totals ...28 17 73 

Indiana won the tourney with an 86-38 vic- 
tory over Point Park. 

At the Vine's Way 



At the vine's way 

a green jungle 
drew itself about me, 

close the greenness 
with the sweet 
warmth of 

aching earth. 
At the vine's way 

a green jungle 
of cool whispers 
trembled through me. 
In the half-shadow of 

lasting evening 
one shade of a 

night song 
Sang. ': ' 

Far off wonder, 

the roar is gone, 
the flames quenched, 
far off wonder, 
and a thousand voices 
cry. 

— C. R. G. 






Word has it that the meals in the cafeteria 
are getting a little better all the time. 

Student teaching assignments are finally 
out. 




BUDDY MARTIN (12) attempts a shot, 
guarded closely by Point Park. 



3 BB Plavcrs Rank 
111 Conference Play 

Tomorrow night the Eagle cagers meet 
State University College at Fredonia, New 
York. 

Leading scorer for Coach Bill Hughes' Blue 
Devil .squad, which is 4-4 on the year, is 
junior Tom Scaglione, 6' 4", closely followed 
by sophomore Kevin Damman, 6' I". Joe Wil- 
liams, 6' 3" junior, is leading the Fredonia 
cagers in rebounds. 

Clarion has two scorers in three figures 
in Buddy Martin with 131, and Larry Kubov- 
chick with 107. The Golden Eagles also have 
three players listed in the Pennsylvania Con- 
ference scoring statistics for the sea.son to 
date (January 3). They are Larry Kubov- 
chick, ranking 10th with an average of 18 
points in conference play; Joe Chalmers, 
ranking 12th with 17 points, and Buddy Mar- 
tin, ranking 31st with 12 points. 



Br* 



Eagle Grapplers Score Victory; 
Give Up Only Ten Points 



Clarion State grapplers handily swept their 
second quadrangular meet in as many weeks 
Saturday, giving up only ten points while 
chalking up 116 against the opposition. 

The Golden Eagles defeated Shippensburg, 
35-6; Slippery Rock, 43-0, and Indiana Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, 38-2. 

Coach Bob Bubbs matmen allowed only 
two points to the foes the week before as 
they squashed Brockport of New York, 34-2; 
Frostburg of Maryland, 45-0, and Howard 
University, 45-0. 

Not only are the Clarion grunt and groaners 
undefeated against their first six foes, but 
have won a phenomenal 62 out of 66 bouts 
and a spectacular 240 points to 10 for the 
opposition. 

Setting somewhat of a record for the Eagles 
is Tyrone's Gary Di Domenico. Wrestling 
in the 177 pound class, the scrappy sophomore 
has pinned all three of his opponents in the 
first period in the three matches in which 
he has wrestled thus far. 

Saturday night the freshmen downed Ship- 
pensburg, 29-6, and the B team won an ex- 
hibition from Shippensburg, 31-8. 



Before the Christmas layoff. Clarion grap- 
plers traveled to Mansfield for a single 
match December 17. The B squad went to 
Gannon December 18. 

Clarion*8 Wrestling Team 
Gets Honorable Mention 

Clarion was one of six Penn.sylvania state 
colleges listed in the "preseason picks" of 
Amateur Wrestling News in their Dec. 11 
issue. 

Published in Oklahoma City, Okla., the pub- 
lication is the only one devoted to all phases 
of amateur wrestling. 

Clarion was given honorable mention in 
preseason predictions of leading collegiate 
wrestlings teams for the 1968-69 season by 
the NAIA. 



Student directories for the 1968-69 school 
term v^ere issued before Christmas vacation. 
Any student who did not receive one should 
stop by the bookstore to pick up a copy. 



TEAM IS UNDEFEATED 



Matmen Travel to Cleveland; 
Face Bloomsburg Next Week 



Clarion State grapplers, having accomplish- 
ed the feat of allowing opponents but two 
points in their two quadrangular matches 
so far this year, are honing up for their 
third big quad tomorrow at Cleveland State 
University. 

Facing the Golden Eagles in Cleveland will 
be Dayton University, Cleveland State and 
Miami of Ohio. The latter edged Clarion last 
year in a 82-81 cliffhanger. Events are sche- 
duled for 1:30 and 7:30 p.m. at Bedford High 
School, Bedford, Ohio. 

Coach Bob Bubb's matmen have yet to 
wrestle their first dual this season and Cla- 
rion area wrestling fans will be setting their 
sights on a January 18 meet with highly 
touted Bloomsburg in Tippin Gymnasium. 
The freshmen will go to the mat at 6 p.m. 
and the varsity at 8 p.m. 

A December 17 dual slated at Mansfield 
was cancelled due to a flu epidemic in that 
community, but may be rescheduled before 
the end of the season. 

Now 5-1, the Huskies are considered one 
of the better teams in the East and are 
rated sixth by the NAIA. They have a good 
nucleus from last year's 7-4-1 squad and a 
fine group of sophomores from their 7-1 fresh- 
man team of 1967-68. 

Bob Bubb's Golden Eagle grapplers face 
their sternest test of the still young wrest- 
ling season next Saturday when they host 
a formidable Bloomsburg squad in their first 
conference sortie. 

Always a power in mat circles. Coach Ru.s- 



sell Houk's aggregation has overcome such 
opponents c3 Appalachian State, Old DomiJ- 
ion, Ashland, Mansfield and Indiana Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania. Their only loss this 
season has been to Southern Illinois. 

Houk's hardy Huskies no longer have the 
services of former N.A.I. A. champ Joe Gerst, 
152 pounds; Dave Jones, 191 pounds; and 
Kurt Grabfelter, 130 pounds, who have gone 
the diploma route, but the veteran mentor 
has replaced them with some fine new con- 
tenders. 

Leading the returning veterans is Captain 
Ron Russo, last year's Pennsylvania Confer- 
ence champ and N.A.I. A. runner-up who pla- 
ced sixth in N.C.A.A. competition at 137 
pounds. He will meet Clarion's Bob Teagar- 
den, Waynesburg senior (6-0), in that weight 
class. 

Wayne Heim, 123 pounds, runner-up in the 
Pennsyhania Conference last year and recent 
Wilkes College tourney winner, will meet Cla- 
rion's Phil Detore, Greensburg junior and 
conference champ last year, in what should 
be one of the evenings outstanding bouts. 

Another probable top bout will likely put 
Clarion's Santo Ricotta, Clearfield junior, 
against Jim Owen at 167 pounds. 

Gary Di Domenico. 191-pound Golden Eagle 
from Tyrone, will probably go against Dave 
Jones in a hard-fought contest. 

Other Huskies to watch will be Keith Tay- 
lor, 115 pounds: Arnold Thompson, 160 
pounds, and Jim McCue, heavyweight. 




Hunter 

Harrison 

Thomas 

Thorton 

Crisi 

Walton 

Nemchick 



Totals 



'W\ 



4' 



s. 



Clarion Call 



Vol. 40, No. 12 



CLARION STATE COLLEGE — CLARION, PENNSYLVANIA 



Friday, February 7, 1969 



New Sign-Out System for Women JazZ ^^h^l Artist — Novelist — Play wright J^ CarrerO 



Takes Effect, Allows More Freedom 



As of last week women residents of Cla- 
rion State College are able to use a new 
sign-out procedure. The new system which 
had its beginning last semester, allows the 
residents to leave their dormitory without 
signing out. providing they return before 
9 p.m. Under the past system, the sign-out 
time was 7 p.m. 

Women are no longer required to give a 
destination, the time of departure and the 
name of the person accompanying tliem; 
they must indicate only that they are "out" 
and will return by the curfew. Dorm resi- 
dents mu.st leave an address or phone num- 
ber at which they can bo reached if they 
plan to leave the dorm overnight. 



This information may be put on the in- 
dividual's sign-out card or in a sealed en- 
velope which will be kept in the resident's 
own mailbox. If a girl chooses the second 
method, she need give only the time of de- 
parture and expected time of return on the 
sign-out card. 

The new procedure was formulated hv the 
Women's Residence Board after many com- 
plaints from residents that their wherea- 
bouts was made public by the old sign-out 
sy.stem. The new system gives more indi- 
vidual freedom and allows the women re- 
sidents to exercise discretion and responsi- 
bility in choosing the place they wish to 
frequent. 



CSC Deliaters Pile Up Victories 
In Illinois, Penna. Contests 



Clarion's debaters started tiie new year 
successfully with victories in both Illinois 
and Pennsylvania on the weekend of Jan. 
10-11. 

At Illinois State University, in competition 
with 40 colleges from 10 states, Clarion fin- 
ished tied for honors in two divisions of 
debate. 

In the varsity four-man division, .sopho- 
mores Marilyn Roslanowick of Meadville and 
Frank Falso of Coraopolis tied for first 
place on the affirmative with a 4-2 record, 
and wins over Eastern Illinois, Concordia, 
Rock Valley, and Northeastern Illinois. No 
affirmative was able to win more than four 
rounds. Others tied with Clarion at 4-2 were: 
Illinois State, Bowling Green, Wayne State, 
and Bradley. 

On the negative, Kaye Berkey of Jenners- 
town and Pat Dobson of Penn Hills had a 
5-1 record, with wins over Iowa, Northern 
Illinois, Indiana State, and MacMurray. 

OveralU-Ciwaea's.^^^ record tied them for 
third place. The third place trophy was 
awarded to Augustana on speaker points. 
Ironically, Clarion had higher speaker points 
than first and second place Bowling Green 
and Wayne State, both of whom finished 
with 10-2 overall records. Kay Berkey was 
the fourth place individual debater in the 
tournament, and Pat Dobson ninth. 

In the two-man cross-examination divi- 
sion, juniors Mary Lou McCauliff of Johns- 
town and Betti Ferguson of Gibsonia had 
enough wins to make the quarterfinal elim- 
ination rounds, but lost when the tie was 
broken on speaker points. McCauliff and Fer- 
guson had wins over Northwestern, Illinois, 
Indiana State, and Macalester, and losses 
to Michigan State and Bradley. 

Clarion speakers also won "Excellent" 
awards in every individual event they com- 



p<>ted in in Illinois. Mary Lou McCaulilT won 
an excellent in oratory, missing first place 
by vwo paints. Kay Berkey won an excel- 
lent in persuasive speaking. Betti Ferguson 
won excellents in both oratory and oral in- 
terpretation, missing fir.st place in oral in- 
terpretation by just two points. 

Meanwhile, Clarion's freshman novice team 
of James Rarick of New Brigiiton and Al 
Carraway of Grausville won the first place 
negative trophy at Geneva College with a 
record of three wins and one loss. Rarick 
and Carraway had wins over Denson, Thiel, 
and Westminster, and a single loss to the 
first place affirmative team from Susque- 
hanna. 

The novice affirmative team of Bob Banks, 
Ambridge, and Sue Ann Knowles, New Cas- 
tle, had a 3-1 record at Geneva, with wins 
over Geneva, Westminster, and Susquehan- 
na, and a loss in the last round to Thiel. 



If You Didn't Fill Out 
That Info Card, Please Do 

All students who failed to complete pub- 
lic relations information cards during re- 
gistration are requested to do so as soon 
as possible. Cards may be obtained at the 
public relations office, B-57, Administra- 
tion Building, and should be returned to 
that office. 

The major purpose of these cards is to 
enable tfiie public relations office to send 
more complete information concerning stu- 
dent acQiievements to their hometown news- 
papers and radio stations. 



Will Play 
On Feb. 26 



The Clarion Laboratory Band, organized 
in the fall of 1968, will present a jazz con 
cert in the chapel on Feb. 26. Downbeat is 
set lor 8 p.m. 

The Laboratory Band, directed by Rex 
Mitchell, assistant professor of music, will 
pcriorm a variety of selections by leading 
composers and arrangers of current jazz 
styles. Featured will be compositions of Bil- 
ly May, Sy OUver, Count Basic, Henry Man- 
cini, and Neal Helti. The ensemble will per- 
form a new jazz work of Mr. Mitchell's for 
the first time. 

The ensemble is comprised of 22 college 
instrumentalists; the instrumentation resem- 
bles that of a huge dance band. The work 
of the ensemble is directed to the study 
through performance of jazz schools and 
styles. 

Individual members of the band will be 
featured in the concert through renditions 
of several jazz classics. Pianist Lowell Hep- 
ler, freshman music major, will have the 
spotlight in his solo performance of Hefti's 
"The Kid From Red Bank "; anotlier Hefti 
tune, titled "Cute," will feature drummer 
Tom Seng. Titles of other selections in- 
clude, "The Naked City Theme," "Shadow 
of Your Smile," and "Pink Panther." 

An added attraction for the concert will 
be the appearance of the Cari Hedglin Trio, 
a popular area jazz combo. Included in 
this trio are Carl Hedglin, organist, Howard 
Huston, percussionist, and Mr. Mitchell, sax- 
ophonist. The trio will present jazz inter- 
pretations of standard musical selections. 



Want to Learn Bridge? 
Save Wednesday Nights 

Bridge lessons will begin on Wednesday 
and will continue for eight consecutive weeks 
in the Student Union lounge balcony area. 

Ethel Vairo, assistant dean of student af- 
fairs, . will conduct the lessons. Instruction 
will begin at 7 p.m. and will run until 8 p.m. 
each Wednesday. Open play will start at 
8 p.m. and will continue until 9:30 p.m. 
aasses will be limited to 40 persons. 

Students interested in taking bridge lessons 
can sign up at the Student Union lounge 
control center. 



Here Are 'The Happenings 





Jaime Carrero, Wlio Will Speak Here Wednesday Night 



HANDEL, BEETHOVEN, FRANCK 

Musicianship Is Excellent 
In Mallory - Pesche Recital 



By BURTON E. HARDIN 
Assistant Professor of Music 

Excellence in musicianship and virtuosity 
was the order of the day at the faculty 
recital Wednesday night by violinist David 
Mallory with Annette Roussel-Pesche at the 
piano. Both are assistant professors of music 
at Clarion State. 

The Handel Sonata in D. Major was a 
model of clarity and perfect intonation. The 
style was captured with pleasing precision 
Hindemith, one of the few modem composers 
whose writing can always be recongized, was 
the composer of the second work, Sonata 
in E. Melodic lines, phrases and balance 
imparted by the team of Mallory and Pes- 
che, gave the work musicality which pleased 
even the most conservative listeners. Phobias 
about the "listenability" of twentieth century 
composers were shattered by the musical 
phrases and well-balanced harmonies. 

The Beethoven "Spring" Sonata in F Major, 



Op. 24 was equally well done. The scherzo 
with its mimicking echo effects between the 
instruments was startling in its brevity, but 
was well balanced by the preceding expres- 
sive movement. 

After the intermission the Franck Violin So- 
nrta was performed. Although one often ex- 
pects boring length and repetitious hackneyed 
devices from some of the late Romantic per- 
iod composers, none was in evidence with 
this performance. The sont-ta exhibited all 
the skill and originality composers such as 
Brahms, and the excellent performance fur- 
ther contributed to the musical effect. Ohe 
of the most difficult and exhausting compos- 
itions for both instruments, there was no 
evidence of this to be found in the perfor- 
mance. 

Throughout the recital, both performers re- 
affirmed their standing as experienced pro- 
fessional artists, and it was obvious to this 

(Continued on page 4) 



Monthly Meal Tickets Now in Use 
At Chandler to Cut Free-Loading 



.27 25 79 



Members of 1968^9 Wrestling Sijiiad Pose for a Picture After Hard Practice 



PICTURED ABOVE are The Happenings, Dave Libert, 
Tom Giuliano, Bob Miranda and Bernie La Porta. The 
Happenings will be on campus February 15 at 8 p.m. at 
Tippin Gym. Admission is free, and the event will coin- 
cide with "Golddiggers* Weekend," a special event 



planned by the social committee. Students will probably 
remember the first single cut of The Happenings, "See 
You in September." Some of their other records in- 
clude: "I Got Rhythm, "My Mammy," "Music, Music, 
Music," "Randy," and "Breaking Up is Hard to Do." 



A new system of checking a student's iden- 
tification has been initiated in Chandler Din- 
ing Hall this semester. 

Prior to this semester, a student ID card 
had to be shown to eat in Chandler. Be- 
cause the checkers were not examining each 
individual card, hut only checking U) .see 
tliat each student in line had one, it was 
easy for other students to cat there simply 
by showing their ID card.s even though they 
were not validated for Chandler Dining Hall. 

A new system is being tried this semes- 
ter. Each student who cats in Chandler is 
given a special ticket which is good for one 



Comins Events 

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7 

— Campus "Snow Sculpture" Party 
—Rifle: W. & J. (away) 
— Weekly dance in Chandler 
— Flicks, Peirce Auditorium 

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8 

— Wrestling: CSC vs. Lock Haven (away) 
—Basketball: CSC vs. California (home) 

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11 

— Wrestling: CSC vs. California (away) 
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 12 

— Distinguished Scholars (Chapel) 



month. At each meal the corresponding 
num!>er is punched on the ticket. This month 
the tickets were distributed in Egbert Hall 
through the office of the dean of student af- 
fairs. From now on however, they will be 
issued to resident students through their 
dorms, but non-residents will have to pick 
theirs up in Egbi rt Hall. 

The change was necessary because of tlie 
large number of students who were eating 
free of charge. These same people seemed 
to be causin;* the hehaviur problems in the 
cafeteria, and according to George Curtis, 
an assistant dean of .student affairs, some 
change was necessary. After considering 
several systems, the one with the tickets 
was accepted as the most practical one for 
the situation in Chandler. It will be used 
for this semester, and if it solves the prob- 
lem, it will be continued. 

Mr. Curtis said this new system has not 
completely solved the problem in Chandler. 
He blames part of tlie situation on the 
shape of the dining hall and the fact that 
there are tew many doors and too many 
lines. He said tho.se who have paid to eat 
often get extra food for tliose who haven't 
paid and the same problem results. Accord- 
ing to Mr. Curtis, when this problem is 
eliminateu, Servomation Mathias, the cater- 
ers of Chandler Dining Hall, may save 
thousands of dollars and those who do eat 
there legitimately will benefit. 

Presently students are showing their meal 
ticket and their ID card to eat in Chand- 
ler, but Mr. Curtis said it will not be ne- 
cessary to show the ID when all the meal 
tickets have been used. 



To Speak 
Wednesday 

Jaime Carrero, noted artist, novelist, and 
playwright from Puerto Rico, will speak to 
the student body at 8 p.m. Wednesday in 
the College Chapel. 

Flying from Puerto Rico especially for 
the occasion, Carrero will speak on "Gen- 
eral Concepts of Painting," in a lecture 
without charge to the general public. 

Carrero, who olten illustrates his lectures 
with bold strokes of his paint brush, was 
trained in the Art Instruction School of New 
York, the Polytechnic In.stitute in San Ger- 
man, Puerto Rico, and holds a Master of 
Arts degree frm the Pratt Institute of New 
York. He also studied in F'lorence, Italy, fol- 
lowing Korean War military duty. 

The versatile Latin American is currently 
director of the Art Department at the In- 
ter-American University of Puerto Rico. His 
works have been exhibited in museums in 
Puerto Rico and New York, and in publica- 
tions in India, Mexico, Argentina and the 
Pan-American Union. 

Carrero's play, "Flag Inside," won an 
award in 1966; his short story, "La Piedra 
de Orchard Beach," received the Esso 
prize in 1967, and his novel, "Raquelo Tiene 
un Mensaje," received the Ateneo prize in 
1967. 

Carrero is a close friend of Dr. Gilbert 
N^iman, professor of English at Clarion, 
with whom he worked in Puerto Rico. Dr. 
Neiman, in his capacity of teacher and ed- 
itor, published Carrero's works and aided in 
his hterary development. 

Thirteen Interviews 
For Out-of -State Jobs 
Are to Be Held at CSC 

During the coming month representatives 
of various academic institutions and business 
concerns will conduct on-campus interviews 
to recruit interested seniors. 

Representatives from the following Pennsyl- 
vania school systems will be present: 

Feb. 10— North Penn Hills School District, 
Lansdale, Pa. 

Feb. 12— Gateway School Districts, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 

Feb. 13— Jefferson County Vo-Tech School, 
Reynoldsville, Pa. 

Feb. 17— Baldwin-Whitehall School District, 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Feb. 25— Bethel Park School District, Bethel 
Park, Pa. 

Feb. 26— North Allegheny School District, 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Feb. 28— Central Dauphin School District, 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

On February 10, the Tribune-Democrat r»;p- 
resentative from Johnstown will be recnuting. 

A number of out-of-state organizations will 
also participate: 

Feb. 11— Frederick County Schools, Freder- 
ick, Maryland. 

Feb. 11— Hammondsport Central Schools, 
Hammondsport, New York. 

Feb. 12— Caesar Rodney Special School Dis- 
trict, Camden-Wyoming, Delaware. 

Feb. 18— Howell Elementary School, Howell, 
New Jersey. 

Feb. 19— Port Huron Area School District, 
Port Huron, Michigan. 

Feb. 20— Newark School District, Newark, 
Delaware. 

Feb. 25— Massillon City Schools, Massillon, 
Ohio. 

Feb. 25— Norwalk-Lamirada Unified School 
District, Norwalk, California. 

Feb. 26— Harford County Schools, Bel Air, 
Maryland. 

Feb. 26— Berea City Schools, Berea, Ohio. 

Feb. 28— Ramapo Central School District, 
Sloatsburg, New York. 

Feb. 28— Orlando School District, Orlando, 
Florida. 

On February 18, a representative of Fire- 
stone Tire and Rubber Company of Akron, 
Ohio, will conduct an interview. 

The U. S. Air Force will set up a desk out- 
side the bookstore on February 27. 



Golddigger's Weekend Next 

Attention, girls! 

"Golddigger's Weekend," next Friday and 
Saturday, will soon be here, offering CSC 
girls the chance to "bag their man" even 
though this is not a leap year. 

The idea of a "Golddigger's Weekend" is 
similar to a Sadis Hawkins' Weekend. In 
other words, the firls will ask the boys to 
these events, then pick them up at t<heir 
dorm and return them safely afterwards. 

Highlighting the weekend will be a dance 
Friday with the Golddiggers and a concert 
on Saturday with the Happenings. The Soc- 
ial Committee hopes that all girls will par- 
ticipate in this event. 



^lMinMMIIfttt^iMMMii*«M«i*Mitt«i*MMft***iMft**iMMai**ii«*«ittft*iMMaia*kriM*«M 



7 



Page 2 



THE CALL -- Clarion State College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



Friday, February 7, 1969 



Friday, February 7, 1989 



THE CALL — Clarl jn State College, Clarion, Pennsylvania 



Page 3 



Editorially 
Speaking 



• • 



On Registration — Isn H a Change 
At Least Worth a Try? 



Many interesting comments were 
overheard at registration last week. 
Among them were such statements as, 
"I've been waiting in this darn line for 
three and a half hours and I'm still not 
through," "This schedule is all messed 
up," and "My number is 134. What's 
yours?" 

After a careful review of the com- 
ments, one can readily see that many 
students were dissatisfied with Clar- 
ion's system of registration. The lines 
were long and tedious — many students 
were forced to wait for several hours 
before schedule changes and adjust- 
ments could be made. In addition, a 
large number of mistakes were made 
on the students' schedules which had 
to be altered before the first day of 
class. For this reason many students 
had no choice but to put up with the 
inconvenience of waiting. 

Last November, students pre-regis- 
tered for the courses that they wanted 
to take this semester. In the mean- 
time, the schedules were computed and 
were ready for distribution during reg- 
istration week. The first step of the 
registration procedure included a long 
wait in lines that never seemed to end. 
Following the waiting period, each 
student received his computed sched- 
ule and picked up the necessary cards 
that were to be filled out. If the sched- 
ule contained no conflicts and if the 
schedule satisfactorily matched the 
pre-registration schedule, the student 
proceeded through the remaining reg- 
istration steps. ' 

But, many of thej^e schedules were 
not satisfactory, and, as a result, stu- 
dents were subjected to a distasteful 
period of waiting to have these sched- 
ules adjusted. Many students became 
angry and felt that the long waiting 
periods could have been avoided. Like- 
wise, the deans who were making the 
changes, as well as the faculty mem- 
bers participating in registration pro- 
cedures, seemed to be weary and less 
cooperative after the first several hund- 
red changes were made. 

Surely Clarion could make use of 
a more effective system of registration. 
If, for example, students were given a 
copy of the times that every class was 
being held and also the names of the 
instructors of each class when they 
pre-register, many mistakes could be 
avoided. A student has no way of 
knowing if two of the classes that he 
signs up for are being offered at the 
same time (and only at this time). The 
result is, of course, a conflict. Also, 
a student has the right to know which 
instructor is teaching his courses be- 
fore the first day of class. Perhaps a 
student has a definite personality con- 
flict with a certain professor or per- 
haps a student has done poorly in a 



course taught by a certain professor — 
should these students be forced into a 
class which starts off on an unhappy 
note? Personal reasons could also pre- 
vent a student from enjoying a class 
with one professor, while at the same 
time, he may be thoroughly happy with 
another. In any event, a list such as 
the one containing course titles, days, 
times, room and building, and instruc- 
tor that is available at registration 
time should also be available for stu- 
dents' use at pre-registration. Obvious- 
ly such a practice would eliminate 
much of the difficulty that occurs at 
registration. 

Another suggestion for eliminat- 
ing many of the lines that occur would 
be to have more than one registration 
station. This practice would cut the 
waiting time in half. One place which 
contained an outstanding jam-up of 
students was at the business office 
where fees were to be paid. Surely a 
system could be worked out by which 
students could go to one of several 
stations to pay their fees. At 2 p.m. 
on Monday, it was nearly impossible 
to squeeze into the business office, and 
hundreds of students were lined up 
outside the office waiting to get in. 
As one student put it, "I ought to mail 
them my check, and let them wait for 
my money, instead of me waiting to 
give it to them." 

This statement came from a stu- 
dent who was irritated after being 
forced through a series of schedule 
changes and long lines. Nevertheless, 
the statement is food for thought. Many 
schools now do handle the bulk of reg- 
istration formalities through the mail 
during the summer and during semes- 
ter break. In this way students need 
only pick up their schedule during 
registration anil possibly pay their fees 
(although fees are often paid through 
the mail, also). Perhaps a total mail 
system could not work at Clarion, but 
the system does suggest many positive 
ideas that could be considered by Clar- 
ion's administration. 

This semester's registration was 
not a success in the eyes of the typical 
Clarion student. Almost everyone 
agrees that the present system leaves 
much room for improvement. A change 
in the present system would be a pleas- 
ant relief to almost every student, and 
especially to those students whose 
schedules required revisions. Since so 
many students were dissatisfied with 
this year's registration procedures, the 
administration is asked to take a 
thoughtful look at the possibility of re- 
vising this system. In the words of 
one student, "Isn't a registration 
cnange at least worth a try?" 




Thoughtfully 

Speaking 



ft 



NEW JUDICIAL SYSTEM 



Faculty Senate to Discuss 
Proposal for Student Rights 



By ED WOZNIAK 



STAKT 



Letters to The Editor 



— c.w. 



Change is Important 

To the Progress of Clarion 



Change is important in the over- 
all progress of any established insti- 
tution. Without constant changes and 
revisions many institutions become out- 
dated, and when renovation is finally 
attempted, they are so far behind that 
changes become almost impossible. 

Clarion is now in the process of 
feeling the need for change. These 
changes are needed in all areas of our 
academic endeavors. 

One such change has recently 
been made in the social life of our 
school. The women students of Clar- 
ion State College began last semester 
appealing for a change in the sign- 
out procedure. They claimed that the 
present system was infringing upon 
their privacy. They proceeded to go 
through the proper channels to pro- 
cure this modification. As of last 
week, a new sign-out system, was put 
into effect. The Women's Residence 
Board and the various deans involved 
are to be commended for this change. 
The long-term effects will undoubtably 
justify this alteration of the previous 
procedure. 



Another policy that has recently 
been modified here at Clarion is the 
establishment of a new disciplinary 
board that is designed to deal with 
disciplinary cases within the campus. 
Again all those involved are to be com- 
mended for their interest in the pro- 
gress and renovation of Clarion and 
its policies. 

To retain their effectiveness, 
changes must be constantly reviewed 
and revised. This is a necessary 
phase in renovation if progress is to 
continue. The two changes in Clar- 
ion's previous policies are a step in the 
right direction, but they should not be 
allowed to become outdated. When 
modifications in these new policies are 
needed, they should be made. Simply 
because a change is made does not rule 
out the possibility that there is no fur- 
ther room for improvement. For Clar- 
ion to continue to progress, improve- 
ments should be made in such matters 
as educational procedures. 

— S.M.D. 



Mistake in Typescript 

Editor, The Call: 

In case I become confused with "the young 
man of Japan who wrote verses tliat no 
one could scan" becau